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Water & Sanitation

'A Good Wife Brings Her Husband Bath Water’: Gender Roles and Water Practices in Nampula, Mozambique

Citation:

Houweling, Emily Van. 2016. “‘A Good Wife Brings Her Husband Bath Water’: Gender Roles and Water Practices in Nampula, Mozambique.” Society & Natural Resources 29 (9): 1065–78.

Author: Emily Van Houweling

Abstract:

In the Global South, gender roles and relations are closely connected to water collection and use. The aim of this article is to move beyond the simple development associations linking improved water access with women’s empowerment by showing how gender roles, marital relations, and the division of labor are connected to everyday water practices. Ethnographic research took place in five communities in Nampula, Mozambique, during a year when residents endured seasonal dry months and later received a water supply project. This research explores how gender roles and relations are impacted by changes in community water resources, and how these impacts are understood from local perspectives. In rural Mozambique, water collection and use are not only gendered activities, but also practices that shape marital relations and cultural notions of a good wife and mother (Abstract from original source​).

Keywords: africa, development, empowerment, environmental change, gender, Mozambique, water, women

Topics: Development, Gender, Women, Gender Roles, Households, Infrastructure, Water & Sanitation, Livelihoods Regions: Africa, Southern Africa Countries: Mozambique

Year: 2016

The Role of Women in Water Management and Conflict Resolution in Marsabit, Kenya

Citation:

Yerian, Sarah, Monique Hennink, Leslie E. Greene, Daniel Kiptugen, Jared Buri, and Matthew C. Freeman. 2004. “The Role of Women in Water Management and Conflict Resolution in Marsabit, Kenya.” Environmental Management 54: 1320-30. 

Authors: Sarah Yerian, Monique Hennink, Leslie E. Greene, Daniel Kiptugen, Jared Buri, Matthew C. Freeman

Abstract:

We employed qualitative methods to explore how conflict over water collection and use impacts women, and the role that women play in water management and conflict resolution in Marsabit, Kenya. Conflicts between domestic and livestock water led to insufficient water for domestic use and intra-household conflict. Women’s contributions to water management were valued, especially through informal initiatives, though involvement in statutory water management committees was not culturally appropriate. Promoting culturally appropriate ways to involve women in water management, rather than merely increasing the percentage of women on water committee, may reduce conflicts and increase women’s access to domestic water supplies.

 

Keywords: water conflict, water management, Kenya, Qualitative, women, water governance, gender

Topics: Gender, Women, Infrastructure, Water & Sanitation, Security, Human Security Regions: Africa, East Africa Countries: Kenya

Year: 2014

Gender and Energy for Sustainable Development

Citation:

Oparaocha, Sheila, and Soma Dutta. 2011. "Gender and Energy for Sustainable Development." Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 3 (4): 265-271.

Authors: Sheila Oparaocha, Soma Dutta

Abstract:

Energy services are linked to well-being and have the potential to impact almost every area of human life, from increased economic activity to improved child literacy, safe drinking water and women's empowerment. Energy is a critical input in the daily lives of women for their household chores such as cooking and space heating; for agricultural uses, including post-harvest processing; and for rural industry uses such as milling and process heat. Energy poverty is a problem that has a disproportionate effect on women and girls. This paper explores the implications of the prevalent energy poverty for women in developing countries. At the same time, the paper highlights how addressing gender issues in the energy sector can help achieve overall developmental goals, contribute towards achievement of the MDGs, and makes specific recommendations towards gender mainstreaming in the energy sector.

Topics: Agriculture, Gender, Women, Girls, Gender Mainstreaming, Households, Infrastructure, Energy, Water & Sanitation

Year: 2011

Gender and Community Mobilisation for Urban Water Infrastructure Investment in Southern Nigeria

Citation:

Acey, Charisma. 2010. “Gender and Community Mobilisation for Urban Water Infrastructure Investment in Southern Nigeria.” Gender & Development 18 (1): 11–26. doi:10.1080/13552071003599970.

Author: Charisma Acey

Abstract:

Although women in urban households in Nigeria are primarily responsible for sourcing and managing domestic water supplies, their responses to problems with obtaining water have to be negotiated within the context of gender power relations, roles and responsibilities, both within and outside the household. This article, focusing on women in poor communities in Lagos and Benin City, Nigeria, shows that there is some relationship between women’s desire to organise for water improvements, and membership in voluntary associations. However, women are generally unable to influence decision-making in the sector through voluntary associations, and are excluded from actual participation in the business of water supply and the associated economic opportunities.

Keywords: gender, development, water, urban, Nigeria, africa

Topics: Development, Gender, Women, Infrastructure, Transportation, Water & Sanitation Regions: Africa, West Africa Countries: Nigeria

Year: 2010

Users’ Perspectives on Decentralized Rural Water Services in Tanzania

Citation:

Masanyiwa, Zacharia S., Anke Niehof, and Catrien J. A. M. Termeer. 2015. “Users’ Perspectives on Decentralized Rural Water Services in Tanzania.” Gender, Place & Culture 22 (7): 920–36. doi:10.1080/0966369X.2014.917283.

Authors: Zacharia S. Masanyiwa, Anke Niehof, Catrien J. A. M. Termeer

Abstract:

This article examines the impact of decentralization reforms on improving access to domestic water supply in the rural districts of Kondoa and Kongwa, Tanzania, using a users’ and a gender perspective. The article addresses the question whether and to what extent the delivery of gender-sensitive water services to rural households improved after the reforms. Household- and village-level data were obtained through a household survey and qualitative methods. The findings show an increase of the proportion of households using improved sources of domestic water between 2002 and 2011. However, more than half of users still travel over a kilometre and use more than an hour to collect water in the dry season. Despite the increased proportion of women in water management committees, the outcomes of these decentralized arrangements differ for men and women. Overall, the reforms have produced contradictory effects by improving access to water supply for some users, and creating or reinforcing existing inter- and intra-village inequalities. 

 

Keywords: decentralization, domestic water supply, gender perspective, users' perspective, water governance

Topics: Gender, Gender Analysis, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality, Infrastructure, Water & Sanitation Regions: Africa, East Africa Countries: Tanzania

Year: 2015

Gender, Large-Scale Development, and Food Insecurity in Lesotho: An Analysis of the Impact of the Lesotho Highlands Water Project

Citation:

Braun, Yvonne A. 2010. “Gender, Large-Scale Development, and Food Insecurity in Lesotho: An Analysis of the Impact of the Lesotho Highlands Water Project.” Gender & Development 18 (3): 453–64.

Author: Yvonne A. Braun

Abstract:

This article investigates the effects of development policy on gender and food security. It analysis how one policy instituted by a large-scale multi-dam development project, the Lesotho Highlands Water Project (LHWP), affected women's food security in the rural highlands of Lesotho, southern Africa. This was a mitigation policy, aiming to ensure that the LHWP did not negatively impact on the people living in the area where the dams were constructed. However, ethnographic research suggests that the policy itself reinforced and exacerbated gender inequalities that affected women's ability to secure food, and put women at risk of food insecurity within their households. Once again we see that gender issues must be central to the constitution and implementation of development projects.

Keywords: gender, women, food security, development, inequality, Lesotho

Topics: Development, Food Security, Gender, Women, Infrastructure, Water & Sanitation Regions: Africa, Southern Africa Countries: Lesotho

Year: 2010

Water Rich, Resource Poor: Intersections of Gender, Poverty, and Vulnerability in Newly Irrigated Areas of Southeastern Turkey

Citation:

Harris, Leila M. 2008. “Water Rich, Resource Poor: Intersections of Gender, Poverty, and Vulnerability in Newly Irrigated Areas of Southeastern Turkey.” World Development 36 (12): 2643–62.

Author: Leila M. Harris

Abstract:

The provision of water for drinking and irrigation is often assumed to alleviate poverty, though results are likely to be mixed for different individuals. This paper examines the intersections of gender poverty, livelihoods, landlessness, and related considerations in the context of large-scale water development in Turkey’s Southeastern Anatolia region, particularly exploring what such an analysis allows for an understanding of variable and differentiated effects of ongoing changes. Findings suggest that certain populations experience enhanced vulnerabilities, and considerable losses, in addition to any gains and benefits of ongoing changes (particularly the landless, poor, some women, and those who previously engaged in animal husbandry). This discussion contributes to a growing gender and water literature, arguing for an intersectional analysis that understands gender as necessarily conditioned by poverty, livelihoods, and other factors. Further, I argue for the need to further enrich analyses of differentiated benefits and vulnerabilities of water-related changes through consideration of geographic, spatial, and place-specific dimensions.

Keywords: gender, water, irrigation, poverty, development, middle east, Turkey

Topics: Economies, Poverty, Gender, Infrastructure, Water & Sanitation, Livelihoods Regions: MENA, Asia, Europe, Southern Europe Countries: Turkey

Year: 2008

Stepping into Formal Politics: Women’s Engagement in Formal Political Processes in Irrigation in Rural India

Citation:

Girard, Alexandra M. 2014. “Stepping into Formal Politics: Women’s Engagement in Formal Political Processes in Irrigation in Rural India.” World Development 57 (May): 1–18.

Author: Alexandra M. Girard

Abstract:

Gender quotas, decentralization of irrigation management, and reliance on MGNREGA for labor provision challenge the traditional patriarchal canal management system by institutionalizing women as formal decision-makers and members of the irrigation labor force in northern India. Based on a survey of 592 women in rural Himachal Pradesh, this paper quantitatively analyses how these policies affect women’s engagement in formal political processes. Results indicate that factors from the private and individual domains influence female participation in formal political processes. Most importantly, India’s gender inclusive policies provide women with the opportunity to legitimately engage in formal political processes governing resource management.

Keywords: women, political participation, MGNREGA, irrigation, India, South Asia

Topics: Development, Gender, Women, Governance, Quotas, Infrastructure, Water & Sanitation, Political Participation Regions: Asia, South Asia Countries: India

Year: 2014

Women’s Participation in Community-Level Water Governance in Urban India: The Gap Between Motivation and Ability

Citation:

Das, Priyam. 2014. “Women’s Participation in Community-Level Water Governance in Urban India: The Gap Between Motivation and Ability.” World Development 64 (December): 206–18.

Author: Priyam Das

Abstract:

Efforts by international development agencies to design gender-sensitive projects have sharpened their focus on women’s participation in community-level water governance. In some cases, such goals have enhanced women’s self-confidence and developed their skills despite having negligible impact on project outcomes. In others, they have simply been reduced to tokenism. This paper analyzes community-managed water supply projects for the urban poor in Madhya Pradesh, India, to provide a better understanding of the gap between women’s motivation to participate and their ability or agency to do so. It highlights how bridging this gap could be pivotal in strengthening women’s role in water governance.

Keywords: gender, women, participation, community-managed water supply, urban, India, South Asia

Topics: Development, Gender, Women, Infrastructure, Water & Sanitation Regions: Asia, South Asia Countries: India

Year: 2014

Gender and Water in India: A Review

Citation:

Kulkarni, Seema. 2016. “Gender and Water in India: A Review.” In Indian Water Policy at the Crossroads: Resources, Technology and Reforms, edited by Vishal Narain and Annasamy Narayanamoorthy, 73–91. Global Issues in Water Policy 16. Springer Science & Business Media B.V. 

Author: Seema Kulkarni

Abstract:

This chapter provides an overview of key issues in the area of gender and water. It gives an overview of different debates around women and environment and shows how these have shaped the discourse and practice around gender and water. The chapter then goes on to discuss the reforms in the water sector at the global level and how this has impacted the discussions around gender and water. A comprehensive review of literature is done in the context of India which covers the various writings and actions in the area of gender and water. The review specifically looks at gender and equity issues in the areas of rivers, dams and displacement, water for production and domestic water. The chapter argues for going beyond the politics of representation and developing new agendas and creative forms of engagement with people’s movements- more specifically women’s movements, farmers movements and unions working on the question of growing informalisation of the economy, greater accumulation of capital, increasing injustices and disparities in everyday living- to see the linkages between land, water, rivers, natural resources and livelihoods.

The chapter argues for going beyond the politics of representation and developing new agendas and creative forms of engagement with people’s movements- more specifically women’s movements, farmers movements and unions working on the question of growing informalisation of the economy, greater accumulation of capital, increasing injustices and disparities in everyday living- to see the linkages between land, water, rivers, natural resources and livelihoods. (Abstract from Springer Link)

Keywords: Domestic water, Water for Production, Dams and displacement, ecofeminism, gender

Topics: Civil Society, Displacement & Migration, Forced Migration, Economies, Economic Inequality, Poverty, Feminisms, Ecofeminism, Gender, Gender Analysis, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality, Gender Equity, Households, Infrastructure, Water & Sanitation, Livelihoods, Political Participation Regions: Asia, South Asia Countries: India

Year: 2016

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