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SV against women

The Experiences of Male Intimate Partners of Female Rape Victims from Cape Town, South Africa

Citation:

van Wijk, E. 2012. “The Experiences of Male Intimate Partners of Female Rape Victims from Cape Town, South Africa.” In Conflict-Related Sexual Violence: International Law, Local Responses. Sterling: Kumarian Press. https://www.rienner.com/title/Conflict_Related_Sexual_Violence_International_Law_Local_Responses.

Author: E. van Wijk

Topics: Gender, Men, Masculinity/ies, Post-Conflict, Sexual Violence, Rape, SV against women Regions: Africa, Southern Africa Countries: South Africa

Year: 2012

Translating International Norms: Filters to Combating Violence Against Women in Lebanon

Citation:

Sabat, Rita. 2013. “Translating International Norms: Filters to Combating Violence Against Women in Lebanon.” In Feminist Strategies in International Governance. London: Routledge.

Topics: Gender, Women, Gender-Based Violence, International Law, International Organizations, Justice, Sexual Violence, SV against women Regions: MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Lebanon

Year: 2013

Prostitution, Gender, and Violence in the Colombian Postconflict Context

Citation:

Olivar, J.M.N., and C.I.P. Sánchez. 2012. “Prostitution, Gender, and Violence in the Colombian Postconflict Context.” In Conflict-Related Sexual Violence: International Law, Local Responses. Sterling: Kumarian Press. https://www.rienner.com/title/Conflict_Related_Sexual_Violence_International_Law_Local_Responses.

Authors: J.M.N. Olivar, C.I.P. Sánchez

Topics: Gender, Women, Gender-Based Violence, Post-Conflict, Sexual Violence, Sexual Slavery, SV against women, Trafficking, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking Regions: Americas, South America Countries: Colombia

Year: 2012

Combating Postconflict Violence Against Women: An Analysis of the Liberian and Sierra Leonean Governments’ Efforts to Address the Problem

Citation:

Medie, P.A. 2012. “Combating Postconflict Violence Against Women: An Analysis of the Liberian and Sierra Leonean Governments’ Efforts to Address the Problem.” In Conflict-Related Sexual Violence: International Law, Local Responses. Sterling: Kumarian Press. https://www.rienner.com/title/Conflict_Related_Sexual_Violence_International_Law_Local_Responses.

Topics: Gender, Women, Gender-Based Violence, Justice, Post-Conflict, Post-Conflict Reconstruction, Sexual Violence, SV against women Regions: Africa, West Africa Countries: Liberia, Sierra Leone

Year: 2012

The Afghan State and the Issue of Sexual Violence Against Women

Citation:

Mann, C. 2012. “The Afghan State and the Issue of Sexual Violence Against Women.” In Conflict-Related Sexual Violence: International Law, Local Responses. Sterling: Kumarian Press. https://www.rienner.com/title/Conflict_Related_Sexual_Violence_International_Law_Local_Responses.

Author: C. Mann

Topics: Gender, Women, Gender-Based Violence, Sexual Violence, SV against women Regions: Asia, South Asia Countries: Afghanistan

Year: 2012

Gender-Based Violence, Help-Seeking, and Criminal Justice Recourse in Haiti

Citation:

Duramy, B.F. 2012. “Gender-Based Violence, Help-Seeking, and Criminal Justice Recourse in Haiti.” In Conflict-Related Sexual Violence: International Law, Local Response. Sterling: Kumarian Press. https://www.rienner.com/title/Conflict_Related_Sexual_Violence_International_Law_Local_Responses.

Author: B.F. Duramy

Topics: Gender, Women, Gender-Based Violence, Justice, Sexual Violence, SV against women Regions: Americas, Caribbean countries Countries: Haiti

Year: 2012

The Securitization of Rape: Women, War and Sexual Violence

Citation:

Hirschauer, Sabine. 2014. The Securitization of Rape: Women, War and Sexual Violence. London: Palgrave Macmillan UK. http://link.springer.com/10.1057/9781137410825.

Author: Sabine Hirschauer

Abstract:

This book uniquely applies securitization theory to the mass sexual violence atrocities committed during the Bosnia war and the Rwandan genocide. Examining the inherent links between rape, war and global security, Hirschauer analyses the complexities of conflict related sexual violence.
 
(Palgrave Macmillan)

Keywords: military and defence studies, human rights, terrorism and political violence, political science, sociology

Topics: Gender, Women, Rights, Human Rights, Security, Human Security, Rape, SV against women, Violence Regions: Africa, Central Africa, East Africa, Europe, Balkans, Eastern Europe Countries: Bosnia & Herzegovina, Rwanda

Year: 2014

Need for a Gender-Sensitive Human Security Framework: Results of a Quantitative Study of Human Security and Sexual Violence in Djohong District, Cameroon

Citation:

Parmar, Parveen Kaur, Pooja Agrawal, Ravi Goyal, Jennifer Scott, and P. Gregg Greenough. 2014. “Need for a Gender-Sensitive Human Security Framework: Results of a Quantitative Study of Human Security and Sexual Violence in Djohong District, Cameroon.” Conflict and Health 8 (1): 6.

Authors: P. Gregg Greenough, Jennifer Scott, Ravi Goyal, Pooja Agrawal, Parveen Kaur Parmar

Abstract:

Background: Human security shifts traditional concepts of security from interstate conflict and the absence of war to the security of the individual. Broad definitions of human security include livelihoods and food security, health, psychosocial well-being, enjoyment of civil and political rights and freedom from oppression, and personal safety, in addition to absence of conflict. Methods: In March 2010, we undertook a population-based health and livelihood study of female refugees from conflict-affected Central African Republic living in Djohong District, Cameroon and their female counterparts within the Cameroonian host community. Embedded within the survey instrument were indicators of human security derived from the Leaning-Arie model that defined three domains of psychosocial stability suggesting individuals and communities are most stable when their core attachments to home, community and the future are intact. Results: While the female refugee human security outcomes describe a population successfully assimilated and thriving in their new environments based on these three domains, the ability of human security indicators to predict the presence or absence of lifetime and six-month sexual violence was inadequate. Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the study demonstrates that common human security indicators do not uncover either lifetime or recent prevalence of sexual violence. Conclusions: These data suggest that current gender-blind approaches of describing human security are missing serious threats to the safety of one half of the population and that efforts to develop robust human security indicators should include those that specifically measure violence against women.

Keywords: sexual violence, human security, women's health, Cameroon, Central African Republic, refugee

Topics: Armed Conflict, Displacement & Migration, Refugees, Gender, Women, Health, Livelihoods, Human Rights, Security, SV against women Regions: Africa, Central Africa Countries: Cameroon, Central African Republic

Year: 2014

Sexual Violence in Sierra Leone’s Civil War: ‘Virgination’, Rape, and Marriage

Citation:

Marks, Zoe. 2014. “Sexual Violence in Sierra Leone’s Civil War: ‘Virgination’, Rape, and Marriage.” African Affairs 113 (450): 67–87. doi:10.1093/afraf/adt070.

 

Author: Zoe Marks

Abstract:

Rape and sexual violence loom large in the study of civil war in Africa. Sierra Leone has been one of the most prominent cases for establishing rape as a ‘weapon of war,' yet little is known about how sexual violence was understood by commanders or combatants within the Revolutionary United Front (RUF). Mainstream analyses of armed groups and civil war rarely engage with gender dynamics, despite their centrality to war making, power, and violence; and research that does focus on sexual violence tends to overlook the complex internal dynamics of the groups responsible. This article examines the internal gender dynamics of the RUF from the perspective of male and female members in seeking to understand the perpetration of sexual violence. It shows that both formal and informal laws and power structures existed to regulate gender relations and control sexual behaviour within the group. It identifies four categories of women – non-wives, unprotected wives, protected wives, and senior women – and shows that women's interests and experiences of sexual violence were not homogeneous, but were instead shaped by their status within the group. In this way, sexual violence, examined in social context, provides an entry point for understanding how power, protection, and access to resources are brokered in rebellion.

Topics: Armed Conflict, Civil Wars, Class, Combatants, Gender-Based Violence, Sexual Violence, Rape, SV against women Regions: Africa, West Africa Countries: Sierra Leone

Year: 2014

Winning the Battle but Losing the War on Violence: A Feminist Perspective on the Declining Global Violence Thesis

Citation:

True, Jacqui. 2015. “Winning the Battle but Losing the War on Violence: A Feminist Perspective on the Declining Global Violence Thesis.” International Feminist Journal of Politics 17 (4): 554–72. doi:10.1080/14616742.2015.1046269.

Author: Jacqui True

Abstract:

Scholars have recently claimed that global violence – defined largely as homicide and casualties from war – is in steep decline. However, research dedicated to using data to prove the decline of violence, in particular Steven Pinker's book, The Better Angels of Our Nature, almost completely neglects evidence of gendered violence within and across states. This methodological and analytical failure results from flawed theoretical assumptions about what violence is and how to count violent incidences. While prevalence surveys show that a large proportion of women and girls (not to mention men and boys) experience sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV), it does not appear in declinist analyses. This is especially problematic given the burgeoning evidence of SGBV's scale and significance in current conflicts, often as a “tactic of war” targeting civilians. Analyzing global violence from a feminist perspective thus radically challenges declinist views about trends of violence. The explicitly feminist perspective on international relations in this article provides a more universal accounting of global violence, and the contemporary changes in the nature and forms of violence.

Keywords: global violence, war, gender violence, sexual violence, feminist international relations

Topics: Feminisms, Gender, Women, Gender-Based Violence, Sexual Violence, SV against women

Year: 2015

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