Political Economies

(Re)framing the Relationship between Discourse and Materiality in Feminist Security Studies and Feminist IPE

Citation:

Hudson, Heidi. 2015. “(Re)framing the Relationship between Discourse and Materiality in Feminist Security Studies and Feminist IPE.” Politics & Gender 11 (2): 413–19. 

Author: Heidi Hudson

Annotation:

Summary: 
"While feminists usually try to ground the meanings that they study, theorizing the mundane or the everyday may very well represent a detour—or even a dead end—if bread-and-butter issues related to the security and economic well-being of ordinary women and men are ignored. What value does feminist theorizing (even if it draws from women's lived experiences) have in war-affected contexts where meeting immediate needs is paramount? At what point does the theorizing of the body under such circumstances become a means to satisfying intellectual fetishes? Theorizing the everyday is messy because it has to contend with the immediate social setting in which popular culture is inseparable from the economic materiality of the conditions of oppression.
 
"In response to this dilemma, my aim is to argue for a productive rather than a reductive relationship between Feminist Security Studies (FSS) and Feminist (International) Political Economy (FPE), achieved through a reframed relationship between discursive subjectivity and a structure-centred materiality. I argue for a more systematic feminist analysis that reunites FPE and cultural FSS critiques. This analytical synthesis is based on an understanding of the co-constituted agency of discourse and materiality underpinned by a postcolonial-feminist attention to the politics of space" (Hudson 2015, 413-414).

Topics: Armed Conflict, Coloniality/Post-Coloniality, Economies, Feminisms, Gender, Political Economies, Security

Year: 2015

From Unity to Divergence and Back Again: Security and Economy in Feminist International Relations

Citation:

Sjoberg, Laura. 2015. “From Unity to Divergence and Back Again: Security and Economy in Feminist International Relations.” Politics & Gender 11 (2): 408–13. 

Author: Laura Sjoberg

Annotation:

Summary:
“In Gender and International Security: Feminist Perspectives on Achieving Global Security, J. Ann Tickner (1992) identified three main dimensions to “achieving global security”—national security, economic security, and ecological security: conflict, economics, and the environment. Much of the work in feminist peace studies that inspired early feminist International Relations (IR) work (e.g., Brock-Utne 1989; Reardon 1985) and many of Tickner's contemporaries (e.g., Enloe 1989; Peterson and Runyan 1991; Pettman 1996) also saw political economy and a feminist conception of security as intrinsically interlinked. Yet, as feminist IR research evolved in the early 21st century, more scholars were thinking either about political economy or about war and political violence, but not both” (Sjoberg 2015, 408). 

Topics: Armed Conflict, Conflict Prevention, Economies, Environment, Feminisms, Political Economies, Security, Human Security, Violence

Year: 2015

Service Is Not Servitude: Links Between Capitalism and Feminist Liberal Conceptions of Pleasure - Case Studies from Nicaragua

Citation:

Portocarrero Lacayo, Ana Victoria. 2014. “Service Is Not Servitude: Links Between Capitalism and Feminist Liberal Conceptions of Pleasure — Case Studies from Nicaragua.” International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society 27 (2): 221–39. doi:10.1007/s10767-013-9158-3.

Author: Lacayo Portocarrero

Abstract:

This paper describes how the way in which women learn to serve others (children, the elderly, partners) influences their possibilities of accessing material and symbolic resources, which have been instrumental for the deployment of neoliberal capitalism in Nicaragua. Through the exploration of the work of two feminist organisations, La Corriente and Grupo Venancia, and of the interviews with the women they work with, I trace the direct and more subtle links between sex and neoliberal capitalism, identifiable in the discourse on sexual pleasure that these organisations use when working with women. Building on the work of scholars coming from disciplines as varied as political economy, sociology, feminist economics, gender and sexuality and postcolonial studies, I argue that while this discourse on sexual pleasure does challenge certain elements of the neoliberal capitalist system and brings positive changes to women, it also contains several risks due to its modern and individualistic imperatives, which can actually reinforce capitalist relations and inequalities. These include the risk of validating and universalising certain sexual knowledge, the risk of diminishing and depoliticising the value of service, and that of building the freedom of some women at the expense of others. The paper advocates for a review of the discourse on pleasure and the reclaiming of the concept of ‘service’ as a political stance against neoliberal capitalism

Keywords: service, pleasure, capitalism, feminism, Nicaragua

Topics: Civil Society, Feminisms, Gender, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality, Livelihoods, Sexual Livelihoods, Political Economies, Sexuality Regions: Americas, Central America Countries: Nicaragua

Year: 2014

The Intersections of Class, Gender, Sexuality and ‘Race’: The Political Economy of Gendered Violence

Citation:

Anthias, Floya. 2014. “The Intersections of Class, Gender, Sexuality and ‘Race’: The Political Economy of Gendered Violence.” International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society 27 (2): 153–71. doi:10.1007/s10767-013-9152-9.

Author: Floya Anthias

Abstract:

This article focuses on rethinking the intersectional approach towards a greater framing within the new political economy and particularly concerns itself with the ways such an approach can contribute to theorising various manifestations of gendered violence. The article examines a range of different forms of violence and reflects on how an intersectional framing can inform our understanding better. Some of the intersectional dimensions to domestic violence, rape and sexual assault, honour-based crimes and trafficking are discussed.

Keywords: intersectionality, political economy, gender, violence

Topics: Gender, Gender-Based Violence, Political Economies, Sexual Violence, Rape, Trafficking

Year: 2014

Introduction: Special Issue on "Gender, Sexuality and Political Economy"

Citation:

Jacobs, Susie, and Christian Klesse. 2014. “Introduction: Special Issue on ‘Gender, Sexuality and Political Economy.’” International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society 27 (2): 129–52. doi:10.1007/s10767-013-9151-x.

Authors: Christian Klesse, Susie Jacobs

Topics: Gender, Gender Analysis, Gendered Power Relations, Political Economies, Sexuality

Year: 2014

Cynthia Enloe: Interviewed by Dubravka Žarkov

Citation:

Žarkov, Dubravka. 2015. “Cynthia Enloe: Interviewed by Dubravka Žarkov.” Development and Change 46 (4): 893–912. doi:10.1111/dech.12168.

Author: Dubravka Žarkov

Topics: Development, Feminisms, Gender, Gender Analysis, Militarism, Militarization, Political Economies

Year: 2015

A Tale of Two Feminisms in International Relations? Feminist Political Economy and the Women, Peace and Security Agenda

Citation:

True, Jacqui. 2015. “A Tale of Two Feminisms in International Relations? Feminist Political Economy and the Women, Peace and Security Agenda.” Politics & Gender 11 (2): 419–24.

Author: Jacqui True

Abstract:

A photo depicting Russian President Vladimir Putin in chivalrous fashion, placing his coat around the shoulders of China's first lady at an Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) dinner made headline news around the world in November 2014 (Allen-Ebrahimian 2014). Surely this is not the serious stuff of international politics, IR colleagues commented in social media forums? But from a feminist perspective that pays attention to the pervasive gendering of IR, the image was not at all surprising or trivial. Indeed, the gender symbolism of the image reveals the patriarchal foundations of international politics. Putin, for his part, personifies the linkages between the figure of the male provider—at the heart of global economic governance and meetings like APEC—and the figure of the male protector of “womenandchildren” (Enloe 1993)—at the heart of the security state system. (Cambridge University Press) 

Topics: Economies, Feminisms, Gender, Women, Peace and Security, Governance, Political Economies, Security, UN Security Council Resolutions on WPS

Year: 2015

Unemployment and Fatherhood: Gender, Culture and National Context

Citation:

Strier, Roni. 2014. “Unemployment and Fatherhood: Gender, Culture and National Context.” Gender, Work & Organization 21 (5): 395–410. doi:10.1111/gwao.12044.

Abstract:

Hegemonic representations of masculinity and dominant images of fatherhood have usually been linked to the domain of work. This article explores the experiences of men under the hardship of unemployment and the impact of these experiences on the construction of their gender identities, specifically on the construction of their fatherhood identity. In addition, the article examines how culture and national context affect the interrelationship between unemployment and fatherhood. Drawing on a post-structural constructivist theoretical perspective, the article describes a qualitative study of low-income unemployed Palestinian fathers in Israel. The study examines three areas of interest: perceptions of fatherhood, the experience of unemployment and the impact of unemployment on the construction of fatherhood. On the theoretical level, the article proposes a conceptualization of the relationship between unemployment and fatherhood. It argues that in order to generalize the impact of unemployment on fatherhood, we must first examine the context in which gendered and cultural perceptions of fatherhood are embedded. On a policy level, the article offers some recommendations for developing more contextualized, gender- and cultural-sensitive policies for unemployed fathers.

Topics: Civil Society, Class, Displacement & Migration, Migration, Economies, Gender, Men, Masculinity/ies, Political Economies Regions: MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Israel, Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Year: 2014

Respectable Femininity and Career Agency: Exploring Paradoxical Imperatives

Citation:

Fernando, Weerahannadige Dulini Anuvinda, and Laurie Cohen. 2014. “Respectable Femininity and Career Agency: Exploring Paradoxical Imperatives.” Gender, Work & Organization 21 (2): 149–64. doi:10.1111/gwao.12027.

Authors: Weerahannadige Dulini Anuvinda Fernando, Laurie Cohen

Abstract:

This paper places respectable femininity at the very centre of career enactment. In the accounts of 24 Sri Lankan women, notions of being a ‘respectable’ woman recurred as respondents described how important it was to adhere to the powerful behavioural norms for women in their organizations and society. However while such respectability was vital for women's career progression, it ultimately restricted their agency and conflicted with other requirements for advancement. Based on our empirical findings, we propose that being a respectable woman was experienced as paradox, where at times it was seen as impossible to be both a good woman and a successful careerist. We highlight the implications of our findings for women's careers in South Asia and more widely.

Topics: Civil Society, Economies, Gender, Women, Gender Roles, Femininity/ies, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Households, Political Economies Regions: Asia, South Asia Countries: Sri Lanka

Year: 2014

The Gendered State of Business: Gender, Enterprises and State in Israeli Society

Citation:

Pfefferman, Talia, and Michal Frenkel. 2015. “The Gendered State of Business: Gender, Enterprises and State in Israeli Society.” Gender, Work & Organization 22 (6): 535–55. doi:10.1111/gwao.12103.

Authors: Talia Pfefferman, Michal Frenkel

Abstract:

Whether the state provides different entrepreneurial opportunities for women and men and how is an issue rarely discussed in the growing literature concerning gender and organizations. Integrating gender and organization literature with political theories of the state, this paper compares women's entrepreneurship in one setting (Israeli society) across two time periods: before and after the foundation of a sovereign state. Our analysis identifies three manifestations of the gendering state through which it moulds business opportunities of men and women entrepreneurs. We examine how these manifestations: the delegation of economic actors, managing interactions between individuals and institutions, and administering a bureaucracy, shape access to capital and the structure of networks. The article contributes to the existing scholarship by extending the understanding of direct and indirect influence of the state on the reproduction of the image of the ideal entrepreneur and on gender differences in entrepreneurial activity.

Topics: Civil Society, Economies, Gender, Women, Gendered Power Relations, Households, Political Economies Regions: MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Israel

Year: 2015

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