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Political Economies

The Intersections of Class, Gender, Sexuality and ‘Race’: The Political Economy of Gendered Violence

Citation:

Anthias, Floya. 2014. “The Intersections of Class, Gender, Sexuality and ‘Race’: The Political Economy of Gendered Violence.” International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society 27 (2): 153–71. doi:10.1007/s10767-013-9152-9.

Author: Floya Anthias

Abstract:

This article focuses on rethinking the intersectional approach towards a greater framing within the new political economy and particularly concerns itself with the ways such an approach can contribute to theorising various manifestations of gendered violence. The article examines a range of different forms of violence and reflects on how an intersectional framing can inform our understanding better. Some of the intersectional dimensions to domestic violence, rape and sexual assault, honour-based crimes and trafficking are discussed.

Keywords: intersectionality, political economy, gender, violence

Topics: Gender, Gender-Based Violence, Political Economies, Sexual Violence, Rape, Trafficking

Year: 2014

Introduction: Special Issue on "Gender, Sexuality and Political Economy"

Citation:

Jacobs, Susie, and Christian Klesse. 2014. “Introduction: Special Issue on ‘Gender, Sexuality and Political Economy.’” International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society 27 (2): 129–52. doi:10.1007/s10767-013-9151-x.

Authors: Christian Klesse, Susie Jacobs

Topics: Gender, Gender Analysis, Gendered Power Relations, Political Economies, Sexuality

Year: 2014

Cynthia Enloe: Interviewed by Dubravka Žarkov

Citation:

Žarkov, Dubravka. 2015. “Cynthia Enloe: Interviewed by Dubravka Žarkov.” Development and Change 46 (4): 893–912. doi:10.1111/dech.12168.

Author: Dubravka Žarkov

Topics: Development, Feminisms, Gender, Gender Analysis, Militarism, Militarization, Political Economies

Year: 2015

A Tale of Two Feminisms in International Relations? Feminist Political Economy and the Women, Peace and Security Agenda

Citation:

True, Jacqui. 2015. “A Tale of Two Feminisms in International Relations? Feminist Political Economy and the Women, Peace and Security Agenda.” Politics & Gender 11 (2): 419–24.

Author: Jacqui True

Abstract:

A photo depicting Russian President Vladimir Putin in chivalrous fashion, placing his coat around the shoulders of China's first lady at an Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) dinner made headline news around the world in November 2014 (Allen-Ebrahimian 2014). Surely this is not the serious stuff of international politics, IR colleagues commented in social media forums? But from a feminist perspective that pays attention to the pervasive gendering of IR, the image was not at all surprising or trivial. Indeed, the gender symbolism of the image reveals the patriarchal foundations of international politics. Putin, for his part, personifies the linkages between the figure of the male provider—at the heart of global economic governance and meetings like APEC—and the figure of the male protector of “womenandchildren” (Enloe 1993)—at the heart of the security state system. (Cambridge University Press) 

Topics: Economies, Feminisms, Gender, Women, Peace and Security, Governance, Political Economies, Security, UN Security Council Resolutions on WPS

Year: 2015

Unemployment and Fatherhood: Gender, Culture and National Context

Citation:

Strier, Roni. 2014. “Unemployment and Fatherhood: Gender, Culture and National Context.” Gender, Work & Organization 21 (5): 395–410. doi:10.1111/gwao.12044.

Abstract:

Hegemonic representations of masculinity and dominant images of fatherhood have usually been linked to the domain of work. This article explores the experiences of men under the hardship of unemployment and the impact of these experiences on the construction of their gender identities, specifically on the construction of their fatherhood identity. In addition, the article examines how culture and national context affect the interrelationship between unemployment and fatherhood. Drawing on a post-structural constructivist theoretical perspective, the article describes a qualitative study of low-income unemployed Palestinian fathers in Israel. The study examines three areas of interest: perceptions of fatherhood, the experience of unemployment and the impact of unemployment on the construction of fatherhood. On the theoretical level, the article proposes a conceptualization of the relationship between unemployment and fatherhood. It argues that in order to generalize the impact of unemployment on fatherhood, we must first examine the context in which gendered and cultural perceptions of fatherhood are embedded. On a policy level, the article offers some recommendations for developing more contextualized, gender- and cultural-sensitive policies for unemployed fathers.

Topics: Civil Society, Class, Displacement & Migration, Migration, Economies, Gender, Men, Masculinity/ies, Political Economies Regions: MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Israel, Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Year: 2014

Respectable Femininity and Career Agency: Exploring Paradoxical Imperatives

Citation:

Fernando, Weerahannadige Dulini Anuvinda, and Laurie Cohen. 2014. “Respectable Femininity and Career Agency: Exploring Paradoxical Imperatives.” Gender, Work & Organization 21 (2): 149–64. doi:10.1111/gwao.12027.

Authors: Weerahannadige Dulini Anuvinda Fernando, Laurie Cohen

Abstract:

This paper places respectable femininity at the very centre of career enactment. In the accounts of 24 Sri Lankan women, notions of being a ‘respectable’ woman recurred as respondents described how important it was to adhere to the powerful behavioural norms for women in their organizations and society. However while such respectability was vital for women's career progression, it ultimately restricted their agency and conflicted with other requirements for advancement. Based on our empirical findings, we propose that being a respectable woman was experienced as paradox, where at times it was seen as impossible to be both a good woman and a successful careerist. We highlight the implications of our findings for women's careers in South Asia and more widely.

Topics: Civil Society, Economies, Gender, Women, Gender Roles, Femininity/ies, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Households, Political Economies Regions: Asia, South Asia Countries: Sri Lanka

Year: 2014

The Gendered State of Business: Gender, Enterprises and State in Israeli Society

Citation:

Pfefferman, Talia, and Michal Frenkel. 2015. “The Gendered State of Business: Gender, Enterprises and State in Israeli Society.” Gender, Work & Organization 22 (6): 535–55. doi:10.1111/gwao.12103.

Authors: Talia Pfefferman, Michal Frenkel

Abstract:

Whether the state provides different entrepreneurial opportunities for women and men and how is an issue rarely discussed in the growing literature concerning gender and organizations. Integrating gender and organization literature with political theories of the state, this paper compares women's entrepreneurship in one setting (Israeli society) across two time periods: before and after the foundation of a sovereign state. Our analysis identifies three manifestations of the gendering state through which it moulds business opportunities of men and women entrepreneurs. We examine how these manifestations: the delegation of economic actors, managing interactions between individuals and institutions, and administering a bureaucracy, shape access to capital and the structure of networks. The article contributes to the existing scholarship by extending the understanding of direct and indirect influence of the state on the reproduction of the image of the ideal entrepreneur and on gender differences in entrepreneurial activity.

Topics: Civil Society, Economies, Gender, Women, Gendered Power Relations, Households, Political Economies Regions: MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Israel

Year: 2015

Northern Crises: Women’s Relationships and Resistances to Resource Extractions

Citation:

Stienstra, Deborah. 2015. “Northern Crises: Women’s Relationships and Resistances to Resource Extractions.” International Feminist Journal of Politics 17 (4): 630–51. doi:10.1080/14616742.2015.1060695.

Author: Deborah Stienstra

Abstract:

Using feminist disability studies and intersectionality, this article draws upon the ongoing resource extractions in Labrador, Canada to argue for examining local communities and relationships as one way to understand gender and global social, economic and environmental crises. The article explores how crises in Labrador have been constituted and maintained around global agendas of economic and resource development, historical and current colonial practices and a limited and constrained international relations with local Indigenous nations. The lives of women and their communities in Labrador illustrate one wave of a global crisis that extinguishes diversity and connection to the land in a race to extract natural resources, maintain global military power and gain profit in the global economy. The actions over the past thirty years by NATO and the Canadian federal, provincial and municipal governments, coupled with transnational mining corporations such as Vale, have “normalized” crisis in the communities and reduced the capacity of these communities and Indigenous nations to respond to the issues arising as a result of the Muskrat Falls hydroelectric development project. Yet the women and their communities illustrate their agency and reject an analysis of them exclusively as victims. Together with researchers and activists, the women in Labrador have built a community of practice in the Feminist Northern Network.

Keywords: feminist disability studies, indigenous, intersectionality, resource development, hydroelectricity

Topics: Coloniality/Post-Coloniality, Development, Economies, Environment, Extractive Industries, Gender, Women, Globalization, Political Economies, Rights, Indigenous Rights Regions: Americas, North America Countries: Canada

Year: 2015

Gender Knowledge and Knowledge Networks in International Political Economy

Citation:

Young, Brigitte, and Christoph Scherrer, eds. 2010. Gender Knowledge and Knowledge Networks in International Political Economy. Baden-Baden: Nomos.

Authors: Brigitte Young, Christoph Scherrer

Abstract:

This volume explores the apparent gender neutrality of knowledge generation and dissemination through knowledge networks in various subfields of International Political Economy. That knowledge is power and that traditional knowledge has been constructed in the interests of the powerful has been a critique of contemporary feminist scholarship from the start. On the basis of this insight, Anne Tickner eloquently challenged the scientific claim about knowledge being universal and objective in her Presidential address at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association in San Diego 2006. In reality, such knowledge is usually partial, created by men, and based on men’s lives (Tickner 2006). In a similar vein, feminist economists have argued that mainstream theories informing policy making in macroeconomics, trade, finance, migration and the environment are based on a very traditional understanding of gender roles. Most treatments of structural change harbour a ‘conceptual silence’, i.e., the failure to acknowledge explicitly or implicitly that global restructuring is occurring on a gendered terrain (Bakker 1994).

...

Focusing on gender knowledge as a research agenda is all the more important, since at the Lisbon summit of the EU Council in 2000 it was agreed to make the European Union ‘globally the most competitive knowledge-based economy’ by 2010. According to this scenario, new scientific knowledge and technological innovation will be the driving force to achieve this end (Walby et al., 2007). However, the key question is: What is the epistemic and philosophical foundation of the knowledge economy and through what channels and networks is the scientific knowledge disseminated? Who decides what knowledge is, where the knowledge is produced, and who are the knowledge makers?

(Young & Scherrer, 2010: 9, 11)

Topics: Gender, Women, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality, Gender Equity, International Organizations, Political Economies

Year: 2010

Do Bangladeshi Factory Workers Need Saving? Sisterhood in the Post-Sweatshop Era

Citation:

Siddiqi, Dina M. 2009. “Do Bangladeshi Factory Workers Need Saving? Sisterhood in the Post-Sweatshop Era.” Feminist Review 91 (1): 154–74. doi:10.1057/fr.2008.55.

Author: Dina M. Siddiqi

Abstract:

This article revisits the figure of the ‘third world sweatshop worker’, long iconic of the excesses of the global expansion of flexible accumulation in late twentieth-century capitalism. I am interested in how feminist activists concerned with the uneven impact of neo-liberal policies can engage in progressive political interventions without participating in the ‘culture of global moralism’ that continues to surround conventional representations of third world workers. I situate my analysis in the national space of Bangladesh, where the economy is heavily dependent on the labour of women factory workers in the garment industry and where local feminist understandings of the ‘sweatshop economy’ have not always converged with global feminist/left concerns about the exploitation inherent in the (now not so new) New International Division of Labor. The tensions or disjunctures between ‘global’ and ‘local’ feminist viewpoints animate the concerns of this article. I argue that de-contextualized critiques derived from abstract notions of individual rights, and corresponding calls for change from above – calls on the conscience of the feminist and the consumer, for instance – can entail troubling analytical simplifications. They highlight some relations of power while erasing others, thereby enacting a different kind of violence and at times undermining mobilizations on the ground. I draw attention to the multiple fields of power through which much of the activism across borders continues to be produced and reproduced discursively. This kind of framing fits all too easily into existing cultural scripts about gender and race elsewhere, and produces ethical obligations to ‘save’ women workers.

Keywords: Bangladesh, garment industry, globalization, sweat shops, transnational feminism

Topics: Economies, Feminisms, Gender, Women, Globalization, Livelihoods, Political Economies, Race, Rights, Human Rights, Violence Regions: Asia, South Asia Countries: Bangladesh

Year: 2009

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