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Occupation

Daughters of Palestine: Leading Women of the Palestinian National Movement

Citation:

Kawar, Amal. 1996. Daughters of Palestine: Leading Women of the Palestinian National Movement. New York: SUNY Press.

Author: Amal Kawar

Annotation:

SUMMARY

"Based on interviews of the PLO's top women leaders in the Palestinian diaspora and the West Bank and Gaza Strip, Daughters of Palestine provides the first examination of the full history of women's involvement in the Palestinian National Movement from the revolution in the mid-1960s to the Palestinian-Israeli peace process in the early 1990s. Going beyond media imagery, Amal Kawar reviews the women's social and political backgrounds to explain how they overcame the traditional gender roles pervasive in Arab societies and became involved in politics. She then focuses on particular periods in the history of the Palestinian movement, as it moved from Jordan to Lebanon, Tunisia, and the Occupied Territories. Issues covered include women's nationalist activities, their relationship to the male leadership, the impact of crises, and the upsurge of the Islamist movement. A consistent theme of this investigation is how conflicts and crises, inside and outside the Palestinian arena, challenge and frame the success of women's nationalist work. Daughters of Palestine highlights the dilemma of national liberation struggles that both promote and co-opt women's liberation aspirations" (WorldCat). 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

List of Figures

Prologue

Acknowledgments

1. Three Generations of Women Leaders

2. AMMAN Early Years of Revolutionary Struggle

3. BEIRUT National Mobilization and Civil War

4. TUNIS Decline of Mobilization in the Palestinian Diaspora

5. JERUSALEM Women's Committees in the Occupied Territories

Epilogue

Appendix: Interview List

Notes

References

Index

Topics: Armed Conflict, National Liberation Wars, Occupation, Gender, Women, Gender Roles, Gendered Power Relations, Nationalism, Peace Processes Regions: Africa, MENA, North Africa, Asia, Middle East Countries: Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories, Tunisia

Year: 1996

Resistance, Repression, and Gender Politics in Occupied Palestine and Jordan

Citation:

Hasso, Frances Susan. 2005. Resistance, Repression, and Gender Politics in Occupied Palestine and Jordan. New York: Syracuse University Press.

Author: Frances Susan Hasso

Annotation:

Summary:
Useful for students of gender and Middle East studies, this book examines gender, women's involvement, and sexuality in the ideologies and strategies of a transnational Palestinian political movement. It focuses on the central party apparatus of the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine and the Democratic Front branches. (Summary from WorldCat)
 
Table of Contents:
1. Origins of the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine
 
2. The Impact of the State on Mobilization in Jordan and the Occupied Palestinian Territories, 1967-1987
 
3. Civil War in Jordan, 1969-1971
 
4. Divergent Protest Histories in the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine, 1969-1987
 
5. The "Masses" Are Women: The Palestinian Federation of Women's Action Committees in the Occupied Territories, 1978-1987
 
6. Modernity, Morality, and Mobilizing Women in Democratic Front Branches, 1973-1987
 
7. Political Transformations in the Occupied Territories and Jordan
 
8. Ruptures, Betrayals, and New Realities in Democratic Front Branches and the Palestinian Federation of Women's Action Committees

Topics: Armed Conflict, Occupation, Economies, Gender, Women, Gender Roles, Political Participation, Rights, Women's Rights Regions: Africa, MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Jordan, Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Year: 2005

Female Suicide Bombers - Male Suicide Bombing? Looking for Gender in Reporting the Suicide Bombings of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Citation:

Brunner, Claudia. 2005. “Female Suicide Bombers – Male Suicide Bombing? Looking for Gender in Reporting the Suicide Bombings of the Israeli–Palestinian Conflict.” Global Society 19 (1): 29–48.

Author: Claudia Brunner

Abstract:

The primary aim of this article is to bring together questions of both the gender representation (notions of femininity and masculinity) and the gender order (existing social relations and power structures) of Palestinian suicide bombing, and thereby to offer a rather unusual perspective on a sensitive topic within what is generally an overanalysed conflict. It is based on the way female suicide bombers have been represented in the media in the first half of 2002, supplemented by publications in 2003 and January 2004. Print and online articles constitute the main basis of interpretation that aims to bring gender as an analytical tool into the continuing debate on suicide bombing. 

Topics: Armed Conflict, Occupation, Combatants, Female Combatants, Gender, Women, Media, Violence, Weapons /Arms Regions: Africa, MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Israel, Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Year: 2005

Challenging the Israeli Occupation Through Testimony and Confession: the Case of Anti-Denial SMOs Machsom Watch and Breaking the Silence

Citation:

Helman, Sara. 2015. “Challenging the Israeli Occupation Through Testimony and Confession: The Case of Anti-Denial SMOs Machsom Watch and Breaking the Silence.” International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society 28 (4): 377–94. doi:10.1007/s10767-015-9198-y.

Author: Sara Helman

Abstract:

This article analyzes the repertoires of contention and discourse of two Israeli antidenial movements, Breaking the Silence and Machsom Watch. Through confession and testimony, both social movement organizations (SMOs) demand that Israeli society acknowledge its “problematic present,” which includes human rights violations in the Palestinian Occupied Territories in a situation of ongoing ethno-national conflict, and insist that it take responsibility for this reality and act against it. It is based on the interpretative analyses of both SMOs’ reports. Reports are analyzed as narratives in the context of Israel’s national identity and its main motives which are also constitutive of a culture of collective denial. The article compares the testimonial practices of Machsom Watch to testimonies of women in Truth and Reconciliation Commissions and the confessions of Breaking the Silence veterans to those displayed in Truth and Reconciliation Commissions as well as confessions of veterans during the war in Iraq and Afghanistan. Confession and testimony are usually analyzed as blazing the path to a new and inclusive national identity (as was the case in South Africa). In the case of Israel, however, their adoption and mobilization destabilize national identity and turn it into a field of contention.

Keywords: Israel/Palestine, Social movements in Israel, confession, testimonies

Topics: Armed Conflict, Occupation, Civil Society, Gender, Justice, TRCs Regions: Africa, MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Israel, Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Year: 2015

Everyday Occupations: Experiencing Militarism in South Asia and the Middle East

Citation:

Visweswaran, Kamala, ed. 2013. Everyday Occupations: Experiencing Militarism in South Asia and the Middle East. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. 

Author: Kamala Visweswaran

Annotation:

Summary:
In the twenty-first century, political conflict and militarization have come to constitute a global social condition rather than a political exception. Military occupation increasingly informs the politics of both democracies and dictatorships, capitalist and formerly socialist regimes, raising questions about its relationship to sovereignty and the nation-state form. Israel and India are two of the world's most powerful postwar democracies yet have long-standing military occupations. Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Turkey have passed through periods of military dictatorship, but democracy has yielded little for their ethnic minorities who have been incorporated into the electoral process. Sri Lanka and Bangladesh (like India, Pakistan, and Turkey) have felt the imprint of socialism; declarations of peace after long periods of conflict in these countries have not improved the conditions of their minority or indigenous peoples but rather have resulted in "violent peace" and remilitarization. Indeed, the existence of standing troops and ongoing state violence against peoples struggling for self-determination in these regions suggests the expanding and everyday nature of military occupation. Such everydayness raises larger issues about the dominant place of the military in society and the social values surrounding militarism.

Everyday Occupations examines militarization from the standpoints of both occupier and occupied. With attention to gender, poetics, satire, and popular culture, contributors who have lived and worked in occupied areas in the Middle East and South Asia explore what kinds of society are foreclosed or made possible by militarism. The outcome is a powerful contribution to the ethnography of political violence. (Summary from University of Pennsylvania Press)

Topics: Armed Conflict, Occupation, Secessionist Wars, Conflict, Ethnicity, Gender, Women, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Militarization, Violence Regions: MENA, Asia, Middle East, South Asia, Europe, Southern Europe Countries: Bangladesh, India, Israel, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Turkey

Year: 2013

Women & Conflict in the Middle East: Palestinian Refugees and the Response to Violence.

Citation:

Holt, Maria. 2014. Women & Conflict in the Middle East: Palestinian Refugees and the Response to Violence. Library of Modern Middle East Studies 123. London: Tauris.

Author: Maria Holt

Abstract:

Women in conflict zones face a wide range of violence: from physical and psychological trauma to political, economic and social disadvantage. And the sources of the violence are varied also: from the 'public' violence of the enemy to the more 'private' violence of the family. Here, Maria Holt, using research gathered in the Palestinian refugee camps of Lebanon and in the West Bank in 2007, looks at the forms of violence suffered by women in the context of the wider conflict around them. Drawing on first-hand accounts of women who have either participated in, been victims of or bystanders to violence, this book highlights the complex situation of these refugees, and explores how many of them become involved in resistance activities. It thus makes essential reading for students of the Israel-Palestine conflict as well as those interested in the gender dimension of conflict. (WorldCat)

Annotation:

Introduction : the Palestine of our imagination --
The intimate history of violence --
'Violated spaces' : Palestinian women and the politics of place --
'She still has the key' : the multiple violences of exile --
War and 'uncivil violence' in Lebanon --
The politics of forgetting --
Conclusion : counter-narratives of resistance

Topics: Armed Conflict, Occupation, Displacement & Migration, Refugee/IDP Camps, Gender, Women, Violence Regions: MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Lebanon, Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Year: 2014

Empowerment as Resistance: Conceptualizing Palestinian Women’s Empowerment

Citation:

Kuttab, Eileen. 2014. “Empowerment as Resistance: Conceptualizing Palestinian Women’s Empowerment.” In Feminisms, Empowerment and Development: Changing Women’s Lives, edited by Andrea Cornwall and Jenny Edwards. New York: Zed Books Ltd.

Author: Eileen Kuttab

Topics: Armed Conflict, Occupation, Gender, Women Regions: MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Year: 2014

Local Power and Women's Empowerment in a Conflict Context: Palestinian Women Contesting Power in Chaos

Citation:

Jad, Islah. 2014. “Local Power and Women’s Empowerment in a Conflict Context: Palestinian Women Contesting Power in Chaos.” In Women in Politics: Gender, Power and Development, edited by Mariz Tadros. London: Zed Books Ltd.

Author: Islah Jad

Topics: Armed Conflict, Occupation, Gender, Women Regions: MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Year: 2014

The Dialogue That Died

Citation:

Cockburn, Cynthia. 2014. “The Dialogue That Died.” International Feminist Journal of Politics 16 (3): 430–47. doi:10.1080/14616742.2013.849964.

Author: Cynthia Cockburn

Abstract:

For fifteen years, in the north of the state of Israel, a women's organization existed in which Israeli Jewish and Israeli Palestinian women activists worked together for peace and justice in a careful and challenging dialogue across difference. “Bat Shalom of the North” was the subject of research by the author in 1996. In this article she reports on her return in 2012 to re-interview former members. Applying the feminist concept of “transversal politics” she analyzes the organization's trajectory, radicalization and eventual closure in the context of a failed peace process and increasing violence in the region. Their perspective on Israel's oppression of its Palestinian minority led the surviving members of Bat Shalom of the North in its final days to envision not a “two-state solution” to the Israel Palestine conflict but a single, inclusive, multicultural and democratic country, in which subject identities are built not on a feeling of belonging to land, language or religion but on shared adhesion to human and democratic rights.

Keywords: Israel, Palestinians, women, conflict, occupation, land, identity

Topics: Armed Conflict, Occupation, Feminisms, Gender, Women, Peacebuilding, Peace Processes Regions: MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Israel, Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Year: 2014

Pages

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