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Masculinity/ies

Beasts, Burgers, and Hummers: Meat and the Crisis of Masculinity in Contemporary Television Advertisements

Citation:

Rogers, Richard A. 2008. “Beasts, Burgers, and Hummers: Meat and the Crisis of Masculinity in Contemporary Television Advertisements.” Environmental Communication 2 (3): 281–301.

Author: Richard A. Rogers

Abstract:

This paper examines three recent television advertisements that symbolically link meat not only with masculinity, but specifically with the “crisis in masculinity.” Using an ecofeminist lens, I engage in an intersectional analysis of these advertisements to demonstrate how they articulate the eating of meat with primitive masculinities as a response to perceived threats to hegemonic masculinity. These advertisements demon- strate that scholars interested in the status of masculinity must pay attention to the “threats” to masculinity posed by environmental and animal rights movements, and that scholars interested in environmental movements must pay attention to the role of masculinity in resisting moves toward sustainability. This analysis demonstrates the utility of ecofeminism in understanding the relationship between hegemonic masculinity and environmentalism while also pointing to the need for ecofeminism to continue to explore the implications of intersectionality for ecofeminist theory and criticism.

Keywords: ecofeminism, environmentalism, intersectionality, masculinity, meat

Topics: Environment, Feminisms, Ecofeminism, Gender, Masculinity/ies, Intersectionality

Year: 2008

International Encyclopedia of Men and Masculinities

Citation:

Flood, Michael, Judith Kegan Gardiner, Bob Pease, and Keith Pringle, eds. 2007. International Encyclopedia of Men and Masculinities. London: Routledge.

Authors: Michael Flood, Judith Kegan Gardiner, Bob Pease, Keith Pringle

Annotation:

Summary:
The International Encyclopedia of Men and Masculinities offers a comprehensive guide to the current state of scholarship about men, masculinities, and gender around the world. The Encyclopedia's coverage is comprehensive across three dimensions: areas of personal and social life, academic disciplines, and cultural and historical contexts and formations.
 
The Encyclopedia:
  • examines every area of men's personal and social lives as shaped by gender
  • covers masculinity politics, the men's groups and movements that have tried to change men's roles
  • presents entries on working with particular groups of boys or men, from male patients to men in prison
  • incorporates cross-disciplinary perspectives on and examinations of men, gender and gender relations
  • gives comprehensive coverage of diverse cultural and historical formations of masculinity and the bodies of scholarship that have documented them.
 
The Encyclopedia of Men and Masculinities is composed of over 350 free-standing entries written from their individual perspectives by eminent scholars in their fields. Entries are organized alphabetically for general ease of access but also listed thematically at the front of the encyclopedia, for the convenience of readers with specific areas of interest. (Summary from CRC Press)

Topics: Gender, Men, Boys, Masculinity/ies

Year: 2007

Green Intersections: Caring Masculinities and the Environmental Crisis

Citation:

Requena-Pelegrí, Teresa. 2017. “Green Intersections: Caring Masculinities and the Environmental Crisis.” In Masculinities and Literary Studies: Intersections and New Directions, edited by Josep M. Armengol, Marta Bosch Vilarrubias, Àngels Carabí, and Teresa Requena, 143–52. New York: Routledge.

Author: Teresa Requena-Pelegrí

Abstract:

This chapter addresses the issues raised by the interrelation between the studies on men and masculinities with environmental concerns and care. In the first one, "Raw Water" by Wells Tower, the aggressive domination of nature is coupled with the development of a hypermasculinity that proves to be ultimately destructive to both others and the environment. In the second case, Scott Russell Sander's nonfiction text Hunting for Hope, which constitutes a manifesto for engagement and responsibility for the world we live in, a meditation on the ways to build a masculine identity upon the foundations of care and restoration. The weight of the destructive responsibility men have historically had in their relationship with nature remains paramount in the shape of the impending economic, social, and environmental issues. The particular intersection between two different areas, gender and ecocriticism, has been accomplished by the field of ecofeminism, thus revealing the ways in which patriarchal attitudes have historically exploited both women and nature. (Taylor and Francis)

Topics: Environment, Feminisms, Ecofeminism, Gender, Men, Masculinity/ies, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy

Year: 2017

Ecology and Environmental Studies

Citation:

Pulé, Paul. 2007. “Ecology and Environmental Studies.” In International Encyclopedia of Men and Masculinities, edited by Michael Flood, Judith Kegan Gardiner, Bob Pease, and Keith Pringle, 158–62. London: Routledge.

Author: Paul Pulé

Annotation:

Summary: 
"Unlike feminism, the masculinities discourse is not currently 'ecologised'. I introduce an 'ecomasculinity' personal praxis to encourage relationship building between these conceptual frameworks. To achieve strengthened relationships requires the acceptance of conceptual differences throughout the discourse. To achieve acceptance requires the virtues of patience, understanding, humility, trust, loving-kindness, empathy and compassion. To achieve these virtues requires the personal internalisation of an ethics of caring. 'Ecomasculinity' offers a path towards this internalisation, doing so by emphasising relationality and points of convergence between the conceptual frameworks within the masculinities discourse" (Pulé 2007, 160).

Topics: Environment, Gender, Masculinity/ies, Gendered Discourses

Year: 2007

Coming Back Across the Fence: Masculinity and the Transition to Sustainable Agriculture*

Citation:

Peter, Gregory, Michael Mayerfeld Bell, Susan Jarnagin, and Donna Bauer. 2000. “Coming Back Across the Fence: Masculinity and the Transition to Sustainable Agriculture*.” Rural Sociology 65 (2): 215–33.

Authors: Gregory Peter, Michael Mayerfeld Bell, Susan Jarnagin, Donna Bauer

Abstract:

In this paper we explore the social construction of agricultural masculinity and its role in the transition to sustainable agriculture. We draw our evidence from a participatory qualitative study comparing members of the sustainable agriculture group Practical Farmers of Iowa (PFI) with their non-PFI neighbors. On the non-PFI farms, men more often rep- resented what we call monologic masculinity, a conventional masculinity with rigid and polarized gender expectations and strictly negotiated performances that make a clear distinction between men's and women's activities. The male farmers belonging to PFI, on the other hand, more often represented what we call dialogic masculinity, characterized by different measures for work and success than in monologic masculinity, less need for control over nature, and greater social openness. Although both are present to some extent in all male participants, we argue that acceptance of a more dialogic masculinity helps promote the transition to sustainable agriculture.

Topics: Agriculture, Environment, Gender, Masculinity/ies, Livelihoods Regions: Americas, North America Countries: United States of America

Year: 2000

Recreating Men’s Relationship with Nature: Toward a Profeminist Environmentalism

Citation:

Pease, Bob. 2019. “Recreating Men’s Relationship with Nature: Toward a Profeminist Environmentalism.” Men and Masculinities 22 (1): 113–23.

Author: Bob Pease

Abstract:

While feminist and profeminist scholars are increasingly in agreement with the thesis that hegemonic and destructive forms of masculinity are the source of current environmental crises, there is less agreement on how to address this issue or on the way forward for ecologically conscious and profeminist men. Some forms of ecofeminism essentialize women as being closer to nature than men, while arguing that men are closer to culture. There seems little capacity for men to change in this view. In a parallel development, some ecomasculinity theorists argue that the problem is not with the nature of masculinity per se but with the separation of men’s natural maleness from forms of masculinity that suppress their infinite capacity to care. It will be argued that such latter approaches espouse either an ecofeminine or ecomasculinist perspective rather than a social ecofeminist view. This article will explore the implications of the social ecofeminist critique (or what some writers refer to as feminist environmentalism) for understanding socially constructed masculinism, and what men can do about it, in the context of the social divisions between men across the world.

Keywords: environmental crises, ecofeminism, hegemonic masculinity, ecological masculinities, profeminist environmentalism

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Feminisms, Ecofeminism, Gender, Masculinity/ies, Gendered Power Relations, Masculinism

Year: 2019

Masculinity, Work, and the Industrial Forest in the US Pacific Northwest

Citation:

Loomis, Erik. 2017. “Masculinity, Work, and the Industrial Forest in the US Pacific Northwest.” RCC Perspectives: Transformations in Environment and Society, no. 4, 37–44.

Author: Erik Loomis

Annotation:

Summary: 
In this paper, Erik Loomis explores the connections between natural resource workers, industrialized nature, and masculinity as constructed by the logger working class in the US Pacific Northwest. In the industrial forest, different ideas of masculinity and nature were formed and performed. Loomis argues that the working class histories of natural resource workers need to be included in sustainable economies and environmental history. This way, environmental activists can develop more sophisticated strategies for creating coalitions with natural resource workers. (Summary from Environment & Society Portal)

Topics: Economies, Environment, Extractive Industries, Gender, Masculinity/ies, Livelihoods Regions: Americas, North America Countries: United States of America

Year: 2017

Men on the Hunt: Ecofeminist Insights into Masculinity

Citation:

Littlefield, Jon. 2010. “Men on the Hunt: Ecofeminist Insights into Masculinity.” Marketing Theory 10 (1): 97–117. 

Author: Jon Littlefield

Abstract:

This paper examines the various expressions of masculinity found in the deer hunting subculture by seeking insight from the feminist discourse on ecofeminism. In its broadest formulation, ecofeminism suggests that men have historically dominated women and nature to the detriment of both. Male dominance is seen as a result of social patterning that has promoted male hegemonic power and ideologies. This paper argues instead that a subtle and ambiguous set of behaviors actually define masculinity in this culture. The data are presented in the form of stories of four individual hunters with diverse expressions of masculinity. 

Keywords: animals, ecofeminism, gender, hunting, masculinity

Topics: Feminisms, Ecofeminism, Gender, Masculinity/ies, Gendered Power Relations

Year: 2010

Representing Disaster with Resignation and Nostalgia: Japanese Men's Responses to the 2011 Earthquake

Citation:

Kambe, Naoki. 2017. “Representing Disaster with Resignation and Nostalgia: Japanese Men’s Responses to the 2011 Earthquake.” RCC Perspectives: Transformations in Environment and Society, no. 4, 15–22.

Author: Naoki Kambe

Annotation:

Summary:
Naoki Kambe explores the masculinist rhetoric of Japanese male intellectuals’ reactions to the 2011 earthquake. Through an analysis of several responses by Japanese male intellectuals and writers, Kambe explores how, in times of disaster, these intellectuals and writers express the cultural and masculine ideals of akirame, or resignation—which is linked to mujō, or the impermanence of nature—and of nostalgia for the remote past. In doing so, Kambe makes observations about the connections between masculinity and nation in the Japanese context. (Summary from Environment & Society Portal)

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Environmental Disasters, Gender, Masculinity/ies, Nationalism Regions: Asia, East Asia Countries: Japan

Year: 2017

Ecological Masculinities: Theoretical Foundations and Practical Guidance

Citation:

Hultman, Martin, and Paul Pulé. 2018. Ecological Masculinities: Theoretical Foundations and Practical Guidance. Abingdon: Routledge.

Authors: Martin Hultman, Paul Pulé

Annotation:

Summary:
Around the globe, unfettered industrialisation has marched forth in unison with massive social inequities. Making matters worse, anthropogenic pressures on Earth’s living systems are causing alarming rates of thermal expansion, sea-level rise, biodiversity losses in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and a sixth mass extinction. As various disciplines have shown, rich white men in the Global North are the main (although not the only) perpetrators of this slow violence. This book demonstrates that industrial/breadwinner masculinities have come at terrible costs to the living planet and ecomodern masculinities have failed us as well, men included.
 
This book is dedicated to a third and relationally focused pathway that the authors call ecological masculinities. Here, they explore ways that masculinities can advocate and embody broader, deeper and wider care for the global through to local (‘glocal’) commons. Ecological Masculinities works with the wisdoms of four main streams of influence that have come before us. They are: masculinities politics, deep ecology, ecological feminism and feminist care theory. The authors work with profeminist approaches to the conceptualisations and embodiments of modern Western masculinities. From there, they introduce masculinities that give ADAM-n for Earth, others and self, striving to create a more just and ecologically viable planet for all of life.
 
This book is interdisciplinary. It is intended to reach (but is not restricted to) scholars exploring history, gender studies, material feminism, feminist care theory, ecological feminism, deep ecology, social ecology, environmental humanities, social sustainability, science and technology studies and philosophy. (Summary from Routledge) 
 
Table of Contents: 
Prologue: Separate Paths Towards A Common Future
 
1. Introduction: Interrogating Masculinities 
 
2. Masculine Ecologisation: From Industrial/Breadwinner and Ecomodern to Ecological Masculinities 
 
3. Men and Masculinities: A Spectrum of Views
 
4. Connecting Inner and Outer Nature: A Deeper Ecology for the Global North 
 
5. Lessons from Ecological Feminism
 
5. Caring for the 'Glocal' Commons 
 
6. Headwaters: Previous Research on Men, Masculinities and Earth 
 
7. Ecological Masculinities: Giving ADAM-n

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Feminisms, Feminist Political Ecology, Gender, Masculinity/ies

Year: 2018

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