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Gender

Geoengineering: A Gender Issue?

Citation:

Bronson, Diana. 2014. “Geoengineering: A Gender Issue?” In The Remaking of Social Contracts: Feminists in a Fierce New World, edited by Gita Sen and Marina Durano. London: Zed Books.

Author: Diana Bronson

Annotation:

Summary:
“With no reliable empirical evidence on gender differences with regard to views on geoengineering, this is an exploratory attempt to deconstruct geoengineering discourse from a gender perspective and argues that civil society movements – feminist, environmentalist, human rights – will need to intervene on these questions in the coming years. The point is to prevent a self-selected group of narrow scientific experts from the global North from standing in for a real global conversation where different views, experiences and visions of the future can be heard, understood and acted upon. Especially when the control of the global climate is at stake” (Bronson 2014). 

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Feminisms, Gender, Rights, Human Rights

Year: 2014

Climate Technology, Gender, and Justice: The Standpoint of the Vulnerable

Citation:

Sikka, Tina. 2019. Climate Technology, Gender, and Justice: The Standpoint of the Vulnerable. Cham: Springer International Publishing.

Author: Tina Sikka

Annotation:

Summary:
This book is the first to undertake a gendered analysis of geoengineering and alternative energy sources. Are either of these technologies sufficiently attendant to gender issues? Do they incorporate feminist values as articulated by the renowned social philosopher Helen Longino, such as empirical adequacy, novelty, heterogeneity, complexity and applicability to human needs? The overarching argument in this book contends that, while mitigation strategies like solar and wind energy go much further to meet feminist objectives and virtues, geoengineering is not consistent with the values of justice as articulated in Longino's feminist approach to science. This book provides a novel, feminist argument in support of pursuing alternative energy in the place of geoengineering. It provides an invaluable contribution for academics and students working in the areas of gender, science and climate change as well as policy makers interested in innovative ways of taking up climate change mitigation and gender. (Summary from WorldCat)
 
Table of Contents:
Introduction
 
1. Geoengineering
 
2. FCE and Empirical Adequacy
 
3. Ontological Heterogeneity
 
4. Novelty
 
5. Mutuality of Interaction
 
6. Diffusion of Power
 
7. Applicability to Human Needs
 
8. Conclusion

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Feminisms, Gender, Gender Analysis, Infrastructure, Energy, Justice

Year: 2019

Technology, Gender, and Climate Change: A Feminist Examination of Climate Technologies

Citation:

Sikka, Tina. 2018. “Technology, Gender, and Climate Change: A Feminist Examination of Climate Technologies.” Societies 8 (4): 109.

Author: Tina Sikka

Abstract:

In this article, I examine the subject of justice as it relates to gender and climate change by focusing on two specific strategies, namely, the geoengineering strategy of ocean fertilization, and renewable energy as a means of mitigation (where mitigation is understood as the adoption of technologies and practices that aim to slow the rise of greenhouse gas emissions). My overarching argument is that iron fertilization geoengineering is not consistent with the feminist values of justice embedded in feminist standpoint theory and feminist contextual empiricism. Alternative mitigation strategies, on the other hand, go much further in meeting these objectives and virtues. 

Keywords: feminism, climate change, gender, geoengineering, environment, standpoint

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Feminisms, Gender, Justice

Year: 2018

Smallholder Farmers and Climate Smart Agriculture: Technology and Labor-Productivity Constraints amongst Women Smallholders in Malawi

Citation:

Murray, Una, Zewdy Gebremedhin, Galina Brychkova, and Charles Spillane. 2016. "Smallholder Farmers and Climate Smart Agriculture: Technology and Labor-Productivity Constraints amongst Women Smallholders in Malawi." Gender, Technology and Development 20 (2): 117-48. 

Authors: Una Murray, Zewdy Gebremedhin, Galina Brychkova, Charles Spillane

Abstract:

Climate change and variability present a major challenge to agricultural production and rural livelihoods, including livelihoods of women small- holder farmers. There are significant efforts underway to develop, deploy, and scale up Climate-Smart Agricultural (CSA) practices and technologies to facilitate climate change adaptation for farmers. However, there is a need for gender analysis of CSA practices across different farming and cultural systems to facilitate adoption by, and livelihood improvements for, women smallholder farmers. Climate change poses challenges for maintaining and improving agricultural and labor productivity of women smallholder farmers. The labor productivity of many women smallholders is constrained by lack of access to labor-saving technologies and the most basic of farm tools. Poorer smallholders face a poverty trap, due to low agricultural and labor productivity, from which they cannot easily escape without access to key resources such as rural energy and labor- saving technologies. In Malawi, the agricultural system is predominantly rainfed and largely composed of smallholders who remain vulnerable to climate change and variability shocks. Despite the aspirations of women smallholders to engage in CSA, our research highlights that many women smallholders have either limited or no access to basic agricultural tools, transport, and rural energy. This raises the question of whether the future livelihood scenarios for such farmers will consist of barely surviving or “hanging in”; or whether such farmers can “step up” to adapt better to future climate constraints; or whether more of these farmers will “step out” of agriculture. We argue that for women smallholder farmers to become more climate change resilient, more serious attention to gender analysis is needed to address their constraints in accessing basic agricultural technologies, combined with participatory approaches to develop and adapt CSA tools and technologies to their needs in future climates and agro-ecologies.

Keywords: climate change, women smallholders, labor productivity, participatory technology design, agriculture, economic growth

Topics: Agriculture, Economies, Poverty, Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Women, Gender Analysis, Livelihoods Regions: Africa, Southern Africa Countries: Malawi

Year: 2016

Gender and Geoengineering

Citation:

Buck, Holly Jean, Andrea R. Gammon, and Christopher J. Preston. 2014. "Gender and Geoengineering." Hypatia 29 (3): 651-69.

Authors: Holly Jean Buck, Andrea R. Gammon, Christopher J. Preston

Abstract:

Geoengineering has been broadly and helpfully defined as “the intentional manipulation of the earth’s climate to counteract anthropogenic climate change or its warming effects” (Corner and Pidgeon 2010, 26). Although there exists a rapidly growing literature on the ethics of geoengineering, very little has been written about its gender dimensions. The authors con- sider four contexts in which geoengineering appears to have important gender dimensions: (1) the demographics of those pushing the current agenda, (2) the overall vision of control it involves, (3) the design of the particular technologies, and (4) whom geoengineering will most affect and benefit. After detailing these four gender dimensions, we consider three ways in which the geoengineering discourse could be enriched if it became more sensitive to issues of gender. These include increasing the focus on the concrete other, recognizing the socially transformative potential of geoengineering technologies, and engaging in value-sensitive design. Although ultimately remaining agnostic on the desirability of geoengineering, the paper brings gender considerations into a discussion from which they have been conspicuously absent.

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender

Year: 2014

Masculinities in Transition? Exclusion, Ethnosocial Power, and Contradictions in Excombatant Community-Based Peacebuilding in Northern Ireland

Citation:

Holland, Curtis, and Gordana Rabrenovic. 2018. "Masculinities in Transition? Exclusion, Ethnosocial Power, and Contradictions in Excombatant Community-Based Peacebuilding in Northern Ireland." Men and Masculinities 21 (5): 729-55.

Authors: Curtis Holland, Gordana Rabrenovic

Abstract:

This study critically examines how masculinities and intersecting ethnonational and social class identities underscore the social and political agencies of excombatants in Northern Ireland and in the specific context of community-based peacebuilding. The authors draw on interviews with female and male leaders in grassroots and governmental organizations, which illustrate how state-led practices of exclusion reshape such intersectional identities and increase the instrumentality of hypermasculinist, pseudo-paramilitary practices in maintaining excombatants’ status and control on neighborhood levels. The research documents how structural dynamics of excombatants’ social class locations and political disaffection help shape their social agencies of “resistance,” underscored by desires for autonomy and recognition, and channeled by ethnogendered scripts rooted in both violent cultures of paramilitarism and nonviolent peacebuilding masculinities. The implications on women of male excombatants’ takeover of leadership roles in the community sector are also discussed.

Keywords: masculinities, peacebuilding, paramilitaries, class, Northern Ireland, exclusion, transitional justice

Topics: Armed Conflict, Class, Combatants, Male Combatants, Gender, Masculinity/ies, Gendered Power Relations, Justice, Transitional Justice, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Militarism, Paramilitaries, Peacebuilding Regions: Europe, Northern Europe Countries: United Kingdom

Year: 2018

Laila at the Bridge

"Laila Haidari survived child marriage and her own traumatic past to battle one of the deadliest problems in Afghanistan: heroin addiction.  As the “mother of the addicts,” she must prevail over a crisis of addiction and a corrupt government in a country on the verge of collapse.
 

Flight

"Two young sisters who arrive in Sweden having fled the war in Syria are becoming teenagers in a new world. They try to hold on to the memories of their once beautiful home while struggling to deal with the repercussions of growing up surrounded by war."

Source: https://laurawadha.com/2017/09/30/flight/

The Pains of the Sea

"Syrian and Iraqi immigrants are trying to cross the sea to reach Turkey. A mother must choose between the life of her child and her own life in the sea."

Source: http://www.splitfilmfestival.hr/the-pains-of-the-sea-mohammad-reza-masoudi/

The Flight of the Swallow

"Due to the extreme situation in her country, a woman decides to cross the border on foot in search of a better life. The journey leads to devastating consequences that will change her life forever."

Source: https://films.sff.ba/en/detail/?film=The-Flight-of-the-Swallow

Pages

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