Gender Hierarchies

Mujer Rural: Cambios y persistencias en Ámerica Latina

Citation:

Anderson, Jeanine, Luisa Elvira Belaunde, Rita Bórquez, María del Rosario Castro, Julia Cuadro Falla, María Cuvi Sánchez, Alejandro Diez Hurtado, Karim Flores Mego, Elizabeth López Canelas, Flor Edilma Osorio and Patricia Ruiz Bravo. 2011. Mujer Rural: Cambios y persistencias en Ámerica Latina. Lima: Centro Peruano de Estudios Sociales- CEPES.

Authors: Jeanine Anderson, Luisa Elvira Belaunde, Rita Bórquez, María del Rosario Castro, Julia Cuadro Falla, María Cuvi Sánchez, Alejandro Diez Hurtado, Karim Flores Mego, Elizabeth López Canelas, Flor Edilma Osorio, Patricia Ruiz Bravo

Topics: Armed Conflict, Civil Wars, Civil Society, Domestic Violence, Economies, Economic Inequality, Poverty, Extractive Industries, Feminisms, Gender, Women, Men, Masculinity/ies, Gender Roles, Gender Analysis, Femininity/ies, Gender-Based Violence, Gender Mainstreaming, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Hierarchies, Gender Equality/Inequality, Globalization, Health, Political Economies, Rights, Land Rights, Property Rights, Women's Rights, Security, Sexual Violence Regions: Americas, Central America, South America

Year: 2011

Lording It Over the Goddess: Water, Gender, and Human-Environmental Relations

Citation:

Strang, Veronica. 2015. “Lording It Over the Goddess: Water, Gender, and Human-Environmental Relations.” Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion 30 (1): 85–109.

Author: Veronica Strang

Abstract:

Focusing on human engagements with water, this article steps back from specifically cultural or historical contexts in order to trace the larger patterns of social, religious, and technological change that have transformed most societies’ relationships with their environments. It examines transitions from totemic “nature religions” to male-dominated and hierarchical belief systems, and considers how these intersected with shifts to settlement and agriculture, differentiated gender roles, and stratified socio- political arrangements. With developments in farming, enlarging societies moved from egalitarian partnerships with other species and ecosystems to more directive interactions. Irrigation channeled water into human interests. Initially seen as embodying female principles, it became the gift of male religious beings. From being a common good, it became subject to male property rights. Long understood as the substance of social and spiritual regeneration, it was reframed as an economic “asset.” Observing these transformations, the article also considers long-term contraflows: indigenous struggles; subaltern religions; and environmentalist and feminist challenges to sociopolitical inequalities. 

 

Topics: Development, Environment, Gender, Gender Analysis, Gender Roles, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality, Gender Hierarchies, Patriarchy, Indigenous, Infrastructure, Water & Sanitation, Religion, Rights, Women's Rights

Year: 2015

Gender Issues in Water and Sanitation Programmes : Lessons from India

Citation:

Cronin, Aidan A., Pradeep K. Mehta, and Anjal Prakash, eds. 2015. Gender Issues in Water and Sanitation Programmes : Lessons from India. New Delhi, IND: Sage Publications Pvt. Ltd. 

Authors: Aidan A. Cronin, Pradeep K. Mehta, Anjal Prakash

Annotation:

This book fills the gaps in conceptual knowledge related to gender outcomes in water and sanitation issues. It illustrates how to get the desired gender outcomes in WASH programs by providing real-life case studies from different regions of India. The first section focuses on the Gender and WASH problem, forming a background for the case studies in India. Ways of incorporating gender dimensions in water management and in water and sanitation agendas in India are heavily explored here. The second section provides a contextual understanding of gender and WASH in India through basic facts, statistics, and anecdotes. The final section discusses women’s participation in the sanitation sector with a focus on developing innovative ways in which women’s role and participation can be up scaled. Through the case studies, the authors argue that the identification of vulnerable households can help in devising systems to reduce the hardships faced by women. Water governance was found to be limiting for women when the existing social dynamics of the region were not addressed. Current training programs of the Government of India were found to lack in having an approach to gender and equity in WASH. The book concludes by offering further thoughts on the “gender how?” question, while providing suggestions for further policy initiatives on gender in WASH. Such suggestions are highly centered on further research in the gender and hygiene field. 

Topics: Development, Economies, Economic Inequality, Gender, Masculinity/ies, Gender Roles, Gender Analysis, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Gender Hierarchies, Gender Equality/Inequality, Gender Equity, Health, Households, Infrastructure, Water & Sanitation, Rights, Land Rights, Property Rights, Women's Rights Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: India

Year: 2015

"Once Intrepid Warriors": Modernity and the Production of Maasai Masculinities

Citation:

Hodgeson, Dorothy. 1999. ""Once Intrepid Warriors": Modernity and the Production of Maasai Masculinities." Ethnology 38 (2): 121-50.

Author: Dororthy Hodgeson

Keywords: Tanzania, maasai, masculinity, Gender, modernity

Topics: Coloniality/Post-Coloniality, Gender, Masculinity/ies, Gender Roles, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Hierarchies, Masculinism Regions: Africa, East Africa Countries: Tanzania

Year: 1999

Sexual Equality, Male Superiority, and Korean Women in Politics: Changing Gender Relations in a "Patriarchal Democracy"

Citation:

Soh, Chung-Hee Sarah. 1993. "Sexual Equality, Male Superiority, and Korean Women in Politics: Changing Gender Relations in a "Patriarchal Democracy." Sex Roles 28 (1-2): 73-90.

Author: Chung-Hee Sarah Soh

Topics: Democracy / Democratization, Development, Gender, Women, Men, Gender Roles, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Gender Hierarchies Regions: Asia, East Asia Countries: South Korea

Year: 1993

Towards a Feminist International Ethics

Citation:

Hutchings, Kimberly. 2000. "Towards a Feminist International Ethics." Review of International Studies 26 (5): 111-30.

Author: Kimberly Hutchings

Abstract:

The title of this article brings together two terms, the latter, ‘international ethics’, is instantly recognizable as referring to a distinct aspect of the academic study of international relations with its own canonic tradition and debates. The former term, ‘feminist’, is much less familiar, and for many normative theorists in international relations refers to a political movement and set of ideological positions whose relevance to international ethics is far from clear. It is therefore necessary to engage in some preliminary explanation of the term ‘feminism’ and how it has come to be linked to ‘international ethics’ in recent scholarship in order to set out the argument of this article. It is only in the last fifteen years that theoretical perspectives under the label of feminism have come to be applied to international relations, although they have a rather longer history within other social sciences and, significantly, within ethical theory. Feminism as a political movement comes in a variety of ideological forms and the same is true of feminism within the academy. The common theme which connects diverse theoretical positions under the label of ‘feminism’ is the claim that paying attention to the ways in which social reality is ‘gendered’ has a productive impact on how it is to be understood, judged and may be changed. What counts as ‘productive’ is related not simply to the goal of enriching understanding and judgment as such (by drawing attention to its gendered dimension), but to the explicitly political goal of exposing and addressing the multiple ways in which both women and men are oppressed by gendered relations of power. It is clear, from the first, therefore, that there is a powerfully normative agenda inherent in any perspective labelled as ‘feminist’.

Keywords: feminism, feminist theory, gender theory, international feminist movement, international politics, gendered policy analysis, gender and development

Topics: Coloniality/Post-Coloniality, Democracy / Democratization, Development, Feminisms, Gender, Women, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Gender Hierarchies, Globalization, Governance, Political Economies

Year: 2000

Women’s Rights Are Human Rights: The Merging of Feminine and Feminist Interests among El Salvador’s Mother of the Disappeared (CO-MADRES)

Citation:

Stephen, Lynn. 1995. “Women’s Rights Are Human Rights: The Merging of Feminine and Feminist Interests among El Salvador’s Mother of the Disappeared (CO-MADRES).” American Ethnologist 22 (4): 807-27.

Author: Lynn Stephen

Abstract:

This article suggests that the multiple facets of women's identities and the ways in which they both accommodate and resist dominant ideologies of gender hierarchy and national security explains their political activity. How CO-MADRES have incorporated issues of state repression, domestic inequality and women's sexuality into a discourse on human rights.

Keywords: female identities, gender hierarchy, national security, political activity, CO-MADRES, state repression, domestic inequality, women's sexuality, human rights, gender discourse

Topics: Civil Society, Feminisms, Gender, Women, Femininity/ies, Gendered Discourses, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Gender Hierarchies, Gender Equality/Inequality, Gender Equity, Governance, Livelihoods, Peace Processes, Political Participation, Rights, Human Rights, Women's Rights, Security, Human Security, Sexuality Regions: Americas, South America Countries: El Salvador

Year: 1995

An Introduction to UNSCR 1325

Citation:

Olsson, Louise, and Theodora-Ismene Gizelis. 2013. “An Introduction to UNSCR 1325.” International Interactions 39 (4): 425-34.

Authors: Louise Olsson, Theodora-Ismene Gizelis

Abstract:

The article introduces various papers published within the issue on the United Nations' Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security (UNSCR 1325) and women's participation in peace agreements and in peace-related political processes.

Keywords: UNSCR 1325, political participation, peace process, peace agreements

Topics: Gender, Women, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Hierarchies, Gender Equality/Inequality, Gender Equity, International Law, International Human Rights, Peace Processes, Political Participation, Rights, Human Rights, Women's Rights, Security, Human Security, UN Security Council Resolutions on WPS, UNSCR 1325

Year: 2013

Talking About Feminism in Africa

Citation:

Salo, Elaine, and Amina Mama. 2001. "Talking About Feminism in Africa."  Agenda: Empowering Women for Gender Equity 16 (50): 58-63.

Authors: Elaine Salo, Amina Mama

Abstract:

Elaine Salo speaks to Professor Amina Mama, one of Africa's leading contemporary feminist activist scholars whose critical contribution to African feminism is drawn from her work across the academic-activist divide.

Topics: Armed Conflict, Class, Coloniality/Post-Coloniality, Democracy / Democratization, Development, Displacement & Migration, Migration, Forced Migration, Refugees, Economies, Ethnicity, Feminisms, Gender, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Gender Hierarchies, Gender Equality/Inequality, Gender Equity, Globalization, Governance, Post-Conflict Governance, Political Economies, Political Participation Regions: Africa

Year: 2001

Gender Aspects of Human Security

Citation:

Moussa, Ghada. 2008. “Gender Aspects of Human Security.” International Social Science Journal 59 (193): 81-100.

Author: Ghada Moussa

Abstract:

The chapter deals with the gender dimensions in human security through focusing on the relationship between gender and human security, first manifested in international declarations and conventions, and subsequently evolving in world women conferences. It aims at analysing the various gender aspects in its relation to different human security dimensions. Gender equality is influenced and affected by many social institutions: the state, the market, the family (kinship) and the community. Human security also takes gender aspects. The author focuses on the dimensions in human security that influence gender equality. These are violence as a threat to human security and negative influences in achieving gender equality, the needs approach, poverty alleviation and considering women as among the most vulnerable groups in the society. Raising the capabilities of women is essential in achieving gender equality, thus security and participation is needed to guarantee equality and to realise gender equality.

Keywords: human security, gender equality, world women conferences, gender based violence, poverty, political participation

Topics: Civil Society, Economies, Economic Inequality, Poverty, Gender, Women, Gender Roles, Femininity/ies, Gendered Discourses, Gender Balance, Gender-Based Violence, Gender Mainstreaming, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Gender Hierarchies, Gender Equality/Inequality, Governance, Nonviolence, Political Participation, Rights, Human Rights, Women's Rights, Security, Human Security, Sexual Violence, Violence

Year: 2008

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