Gender Balance

The Impact of Political Conflict on Women: The Case of Afghanistan

Citation:

Sima Wali, Elizabeth Gould, and Paul Fitzgerald. 1999. “The Impact of Political Conflict on Women: The Case of Afghanistan.” American Public Health Association, 1474–76.

 

Authors: Sima Wali, Elizabeth Gould, Paul Fitzgerald

Abstract:

“The article examines the link between the crises in women's health and human rights in Afghanistan and the political circumstances that caused them. The wall of silence that separated the political events of Communist era from their human consequences perpetuates humanitarian crises and frustrates relief workers and activists in their efforts to end crimes against humanity. As a result of the division between humanitarian crises and the political discourse that would alter them, conflicts remain unresolved, leaving the victims exposed to multiple abuses.”

 

(EBSCO host)

Topics: Armed Conflict, Ethnic/Communal Wars, Gender, Women, Gender Balance, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality, Justice, Crimes against Humanity, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Militarism, Post-Conflict, Post-Conflict Reconstruction, Rights, Human Rights, Women's Rights, Security, Human Security Regions: Asia, South Asia Countries: Afghanistan

Year: 1999

Malaybalay City Integrated Survey System: A Tool for Gender Responsive Budgeting in Local Governance

Citation:

Ronolo, Herculano S. 2016. “Malaybalay City Integrated Survey System: A Tool for Gender Responsive Budgeting in Local Governance.” In Gender Responsive and Participatory Budgeting, edited by Cecilia Ng, 123–39. SpringerBriefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace 22. Springer International Publishing. 

Author: Herculano S. Ronolo

Abstract:

Malaybalay city in the Philippines piloted a data-based system of local governance that is also useful as a tool for gender responsive budgeting. By collecting sex-disaggregated data about household membership, nutrition levels, education, income and other parameters of poverty, the system allows local government to identify gender issues and subsequently justify budgeting for social initiatives such as education, health and gender-sensitive livelihood training. The process of data gathering was also made gender sensitive and empowering by training the barangay health workers, many of them women, in collecting and processing the related information. Such an analysis allows us to ensure that budgets are not merely gender sensitive, but also accountable.

Keywords: MISS, Sex-disaggregated data, gender awareness, Barangay workers

Topics: Education, Gender, Gender Balance, Gender Budgeting, Health, Livelihoods Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia

Year: 2016

Decolonizing Branded Peacebuilding: Abjected Women Talk back to the Finnish Women, Peace and Security Agenda

Citation:

Jauhola, Marjaana. 2016. “Decolonizing Branded Peacebuilding: Abjected Women Talk back to the Finnish Women, Peace and Security Agenda.” International Affairs 92 (2): 333–51. doi:10.1111/1468-2346.12554.

 

Author: Marjaana Jauhola

Abstract:

This article interrogates the sexual ideology of Finnish peacebuilding, the country’s foreign policy brand and the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda by examining the experiences of women ’written out of history’. Using the method of ’writing back’ I juxtapose the construction of a gender-friendly global peacebuilder identity with experiences in Finland after the Lapland War (1944–45) and in post-conflict Aceh, Indonesia (1976–2005). Although being divided tempo- rarily and geographically, these two contexts form an intimate part of the abjected and invisible part of the Finnish WPS agenda, revealing a number of colonial and violent overtones of postwar reconstruction: economic and political postwar dystopia of Skolt Sámi and neglect of Acehnese women’s experiences in branding the peace settlement and its implementation as a success. Jointly they critique and challenge both the gender/women-friendly peacebuilder identity construction of Finland and locate the sexual ideology of WPS to that of political economy and post-conflict political, legal and economic reforms. The article illustrates how the Finnish foreign policy brand has constructed the country as a global problem- solver and peacemaker, drawing on the heteronormative myth of already achieved gender equality on the one hand and, on the other, tamed asexual female subjec- tivity: the ‘good woman’ as peacebuilder or victim of violence. By drawing atten- tion to violent e ects of the global WPS agenda demanding decolonialization, I suggest that the real success of the WPS agenda should be evaluated by those who have been ‘written out’. 

 

Topics: Gender, Women, Gender Analysis, Gender Balance, Post-Conflict, Post-Conflict Reconstruction, Peacebuilding, Sexuality Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia, Europe, Nordic states, Northern Europe Countries: Finland, Indonesia

Year: 2016

Gendering Processes of Institutional Design: Activists at the Negotiating Table

Citation:

McLeod, Laura, Rachel Johnson, Sheila Meintjes, Alice Brown and Valerie Oosterveld. 2014. "Gendering Processes of Institutional Design: Activists at the Negotiating Table." International Feminist Journal of Politics 16 (2): 354–69. 

Author: Laura McLeod, Rachel Johnson, Sheila Meintjes, Alice Brown, Valerie Oosterveld

Topics: Gender, Women, Gender Roles, Gender Balance, Gendered Power Relations, Governance, Post-Conflict Governance, Political Participation, Post-Conflict

Year: 2014

Military Invasion and Women's Political Representation: Gender Quotas in Post-Conflict Afghanistan and Iraq

Citation:

Krook, Mona Lena, Diana Z. O’Brien, and Krista M. Swip. 2010. “Military Invasion and Women’s Political Representation: Gender Quotas in Post-Conflict Afghanistan and Iraq.” International Feminist Journal of Politics 12 (1): 66–79.

Authors: Mona Lena Krook, Diana Z. O’Brien, Krista M. Swip

Topics: Gender, Women, Gender Balance, Governance, Constitutions, Quotas, Post-Conflict Governance, International Organizations, Political Participation, Post-Conflict, Rights, Women's Rights, UN Security Council Resolutions on WPS, UNSCR 1325 Regions: Asia, Middle East, South Asia Countries: Afghanistan, Iraq

Year: 2010

Domestic Violence Prevention through the Constructing Violence-Free Masculinities Programme: An Experience from Peru

Citation:

Mitchell, Rhoda. 2013. “Domestic Violence Prevention through the Constructing Violence-Free Masculinities Programme: An Experience from Peru.” Gender and Development 21 (1): 97-109

Author: Rhoda Mitchell

Abstract:

This paper examines work undertaken with male perpetrators of violence in the Construction of Violence-free Masculinities, a project run by the Centro Mujer Teresa de Jesus, a Women’s Centre located in a poor peri-urban district of Lima, Peru, in conjunction with Oxfam-Quebec. Centre staff faced the challenge of how to work with men who are violent towards their intimate partners. They use a community education approach, to challenge powerful stereotypes about gender roles, to question men’s assumed dominance over women, and support men to construct new forms of masculinity, without violence. Ultimately, the programme seeks to modify and change the beliefs, values, attitudes, and behaviours of men who are aggressors.

Keywords: masculinity, Intimate partner violence, domestic violence, men's groups

Topics: Armed Conflict, Civil Wars, Ethnic/Communal Wars, Domestic Violence, Education, Gender, Women, Men, Girls, Boys, Masculinity/ies, Gender Roles, Gender Analysis, Gender Balance, Gender-Based Violence, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Gender Hierarchies, Gender Equality/Inequality, Gender Equity, Masculinism, Households, NGOs, Nonviolence, Sexual Violence, Male Perpetrators, Rape, SV against Women, Sexuality, Violence Regions: Americas, Central America, South America Countries: Peru

Year: 2013

Women in Mining : A Conceptual Framework for Gender Issues in the South African Mining Sector

Citation:

Botha, Doret and Freek Cronje. 2015. “Women in Mining: A Conceptual Framework for Gender Issues in the South African Mining Sector.” South African Journal of Labour Relations 39 (1): 10-37.

Authors: Doret Botha, Freek Cronje

Abstract:

New mining legislation aims to rectify previous inequalities and disadvantages in the mining sector and specifically provides for the inclusion of women in core mining activities. Although there is no lack of good will, the achievement of gender equality in the male-dominated mining sector remains one of the biggest equity challenges in the country and numerous problems accompany the deployment of women in core mining activities. The main objective of the study was to critically analyse gender issues in the mining sector and then to develop a conceptual framework that will enable the mining sector to contribute to and ensure the sustainable employment of women in this sector. A literature review was carried out to gain an in-depth understanding of the variables that have an impact on women in the mining sector specifically. An empirical study was conducted to identify and investigate relevant gender-related issues in the mining sector. Quantitative and qualitative research paradigms were used. The research revealed that various factors need to be considered for the successful and sustainable deployment of women in the mining sector. The study concludes by making recommendations and offering a conceptual framework that could be implemented and used by various stakeholders in the mining sector.

Topics: Development, Economies, Economic Inequality, Extractive Industries, Gender, Women, Gender Roles, Gender Balance, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality, Gender Equity, Livelihoods Regions: Africa, Southern Africa Countries: South Africa

Year: 2015

Work and Power: The Connection Between Female Labor Force Participation and Female Political Representation

Citation:

Iversen, Torben, and Frances Rosenbluth. 2008. “Work and Power: The Connection Between Female Labor Force Participation and Female Political Representation.” Annual Review of Political Science 11 (1): 479–95.

Authors: Torben Iversen, Frances Rosenbluth

Abstract:

Mainstream political economy has tended to treat the family as a unit when examining the distributional consequences of labor market institutions and of public policy. In a world with high divorce rates, we argue that this simplification is more likely to obscure than to instruct. We find that labor market opportunities for women, which vary systematically with the position of countries in the international division of labor and with the structure of the welfare state, affect women’s bargaining power within the family and as a result, can explain much of the cross country variation in the gender division of labor as well as the gender gap in political preferences.

Topics: Economies, Economic Inequality, Poverty, Gender, Women, Gender Roles, Gender Balance, Governance, Elections, Households, Political Participation

Year: 2008

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