Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

Economies

Gendering Global Political Economy

Citation:

Marchand, Marianne H., Jill Steans, and Rahel Kunz. 2014. Gendering Global Political Economy. Basingstoke, Hampshire, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Authors: Marianne H. Marchand, Jill Steans, Rahel Kunz

Topics: Economies, Gender, Political Economies

Year: 2014

Social Reproduction: Feminist Political Economy Challenges Neo-Liberalism

Citation:

Luxton, Meg, and Kate Bezanson, eds. 2006. Social Reproduction: Feminist Political Economy Challenges Neo-Liberalism. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Authors: Meg Luxton, Kate Bezanson

Abstract:

Using a feminist political economy approach, contributors document the impact of current socio-economic policies on states, markets, households, and communities. Relying on impressive empirical research, they argue that women bear the costs of and responsibility for care-giving and show that the theoretical framework provided by feminist analyses of social reproduction not only corrects the gender-blindness of most economic theories but suggests an alternative that places care-giving at its centre. In this illuminating study, they challenge feminist scholars to re-engage with materialism and political economy to engage with feminism. (Amazon)

Topics: Economies, Care Economies, Feminisms, Gender, Political Economies

Year: 2006

Unpacking Globalization: Markets, Gender, and Work

Citation:

Lucas, Linda E. 2007. Unpacking Globalization: Markets, Gender, and Work. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

Author: Linda E. Lucas

Abstract:

Unpacking Globalization examines the experiences of people living with the forces that are transforming economic systems, culture, gender relationships and governance. The book offers interdisciplinary analysis of the well-being of women and men as they cope with the changes of globalization. Through theory, case studies, and data, several themes emerge indicating that from the household to the continental level, change is leading to new awareness and new survival strategies for both women and men. The contributors to the volume come from Africa, Asia, Europe, and North and South America. They present analysis of global changes and historical background from diverse perspectives and offer case studies on social security, gender, and macroeconomy. They employ feminist theory as well as detail the experiences of current and future women entrepreneurs. An exciting interdisciplinary text, Unpacking Globalization can supplement women's studies, anthropology, sociology, and economic development courses. (Amazon)

Topics: Economies, Gender, Globalization, Political Economies

Year: 2007

Toward a Feminist Political Economy of Capitalism and Carcerality

Citation:

LeBaron, Genevieve, and Adrienne Roberts. 2010. “Toward a Feminist Political Economy of Capitalism and Carcerality.” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 36 (1): 19–44. doi:10.1086/652915.

Authors: Genevieve LeBaron, Adrienne Roberts

Topics: Economies, Feminisms, Gender, Political Economies

Year: 2010

Globalisation, Gender and Work in the Context of Economic Transition: The Case of Vietnam

Citation:

Kabeer, Naila, and Tran Thi Van Anh. 2006. “Globalisation, Gender and Work in the Context of Economic Transition: The Case of Vietnam.” Working Paper 06-3, The International Working Group on Gender, Macroeconomics, and International Economics, Salt Lake City, UT.

Authors: Naila Kabeer, Tran Thi Van Anh

Abstract:

This paper is concerned with the gender and poverty implications of globalisation in the context of the transition to the market economy in Vietnam. As elsewhere, the export oriented garment industry in Vietnam is a major source of employment for women. Women are also actively engaged in the domestic market, both in the formal state and private sector as well as in the informal economy. The paper uses survey data to compare the characteristics, conditions and preferences of women workers working for global and local markets in order to ascertain who they are, how they might differ and what their jobs mean to them. It finds that garment workers tended to form a distinct category of workers – young, single, with at least secondary education who have recently migrated from the country side. Women working for the local economy were far more heterogeneous and included older residents of the city with high levels of education working for the state as well as a more mixed group of women working in private wage and self employment. The findings suggest that entry into garment work represents an aspect of the diversification strategies of rural households for some women while for others, it constitutes the attempt to become more self-reliant. A higher percentage of garment workers expressed a preference for alternative forms of work than non-garment workers, a reflection of their long hours of work and exploitative working conditions. While public sector employees outside the garment sector expressed the highest levels of satisfaction with their jobs, this was not an option open to all. Instead, young women migrating from the countryside saw garment employment as an opportunity to save and take up self-employment. The paper concludes that until rural unemployment is tackled and alternative jobs made available, a female labour supply will continue to be available for the garment industry, regardless of the conditions which prevail in them. 

Topics: Economies, Poverty, Gender, Globalization, Livelihoods, Political Economies Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Vietnam

Year: 2006

Women’s Economic Empowerment: Key Issues and Policy Options

Citation:

Kabeer, Naila. 2009. Women’s Economic Empowerment: Key Issues and Policy Options. Stockholm: SIDA & Ministry of Foreign Affairs Sweden.

Author: Naila Kabeer

Abstract:

The paper discusses the limits to markets as a means of overcoming 'durable inequalities' which reflect long-established power relations and the need for public action by states and civil society to address these underlying causes. The paper sketches out a number of areas where policies could make a difference, including a difference on the terms on which women can participate in, contribute to and benefit from processes of economic growth. They include; building women's human capital and capabilities, redistributing reproductive responsibilities, equalising property rights, mainstream women into the financial system and promoting gender-aware social protection. (SIDA)

Topics: Economies, Gender, Women, Political Economies

Year: 2009

Mainstreaming Gender and Social Protection in the Informal Economy

Citation:

Kabeer, Naila. 2008. Mainstreaming Gender and Social Protection in the Informal Economy. New Dehli: Routledge.

Author: Naila Kabeer

Abstract:

In Mainstreaming Gender in Social Protection for the Informal Economy Naila Kabeer explores the gendered dimensions of risk, vulnerability and insecurity and hence the need for a gender perspective in the design of social protection measures. Her emphasis is on the informal economy because that is where the majority of women, and indeed the poor, are to be found while also being where official efforts for social protection are most limited.

The book will enhance understanding of the constraints and barriers that confine women to more poorly remunerated, more casual and more insecure forms of waged and self-employment, and of what this implies for women’s ability to provide for their families and cope with insecurity. Kabeer develops a framework of analysis that integrates gender, life course and livelihoods perspectives in order to explore the interactions between gender inequality, household poverty and labour market forces that help to produce gender-differentiated experiences of risk and vulnerability for the working poor. She then examines and assesses examples of social protection measures – from child allowances to pensions – in order to illustrate the necessity for a gender-analytical approach. She also stresses the importance of an organised voice for vulnerable and marginalised workers.

Finally, the author synthesises the main lessons that emerge out of the discussion and identifies gaps and exclusions in the social protection agenda. (The Commonwealth)

Topics: Economies, Gender, Gender Mainstreaming, Political Economies

Year: 2008

Gender, Labour Markets and Poverty: An Overview

Citation:

Kabeer, Naila. 2008. “Gender, Labour Markets and Poverty: An Overview.” Poverty in Focus. Special Issue on Gender Equality 13: 3–5.

Author: Naila Kabeer

Topics: Economies, Poverty, Gender, Livelihoods, Political Economies

Year: 2008

Is Microfinance a ‘Magic Bullet’ for Women’s Empowerment? Analysis of Findings from South Asia

Citation:

Kabeer, Naila. 2005. “Is Microfinance a ‘Magic Bullet’ for Women’s Empowerment? Analysis of Findings from South Asia.” Economic and Political Weekly 40 (44-45): 4709–18.

Author: Naila Kabeer

Abstract:

Opinions on the impact of microfinance have been divided between those who see it as a “magic bullet” for women’s empowerment and others who are dismissive of its abilities as a cure-all panacea for development. This paper seeks to examine the empirical evidence on the impact of microfinance with respect to poverty reduction and empowerment of poor women.

The author argues that the provision of financial services, like the provision of any development resource, represents a range of possibilities, rather than a predetermined set of outcomes. It notes that which of these possibilities are realised in practice will be influenced by a host of factors, including philosophy that governs their delivery, the extent to which they are tailored to the needs and interests of those they are intended to reach, the nature of the relationships which govern their delivery and the calibre and commitment of the people who are responsible for their delivery.

The paper is specifically interested in the extent to which access to financial services helps poor women address their practical daily needs as well as their strategic gender interests and whether the approach taken makes a difference to these outcomes. It is also suggested that how needs are addressed may be as critical as which needs are addressed in bringing about the larger structural transformation embodied in the idea of strategic gender interests.

The conclusion proposes the need for caution in talking about the impact of microfinance, in general, and the need to talk about the impact the particular organisations have had in particular contexts. However, regardless of the pace and the extent of the change that they bring about, the review in this paper suggests that microfinance offers an important and effective means to achieving change on a number of different fronts, economic, social and perhaps also political. Nevertheless it becomes apparent that access to financial services does not “automatically” empower poor women and their households. An intervention is contingent on context, commitment and capacity if this potential is to become a reality. (Rural Finance Learning Center)

Topics: Economies, Gender, Women, Political Economies Regions: Asia, South Asia

Year: 2005

Globalization, Labor Standards, and Women’s Rights: Dilemmas of Collective (In)action in an Interdependent World

Citation:

Kabeer, Naila. 2004. “Globalization, Labor Standards, and Women’s Rights: Dilemmas of Collective (In)action in an Interdependent World.” Feminist Economics 10 (1): 3–35. doi:10.1080/1354570042000198227.

Author: Naila Kabeer

Abstract:

This paper challenges the idea that a “social clause” to enforce global labor standards through international trade agreements serves the interests of women export workers in poor countries. Drawing on fieldwork in Bangladesh and empirical studies, the author argues that exploitative as these jobs appear to Western reformers, for many women workers in the South they represent genuine opportunities. Clearly, these women would wish to better their working conditions; yet having no social safety net, and knowing that jobs in the informal economy, their only alternative, offer far worse prospects, women cannot fight for better conditions. Moreover, global efforts to enforce labor standards through trade sanctions may lead to declining employment or to the transfer of jobs to the informal economy. Lacking measures that also address the conditions of workers in this informal economy, demands for “the social clause” will reinforce, and may exacerbate, social inequalities in the labor market.

Topics: Economies, Gender, Women, Globalization, Livelihoods, Political Economies, Rights, Women's Rights

Year: 2004

Pages

© 2020 CONSORTIUM ON GENDER, SECURITY & HUMAN RIGHTSLEGAL STATEMENT All photographs used on this site, and any materials posted on it, are the property of their respective owners, and are used by permission. Photographs: The images used on the site may not be downloaded, used, or reproduced in any way without the permission of the owner of the image. Materials: Visitors to the site are welcome to peruse the materials posted for their own research or for educational purposes. These materials, whether the property of the Consortium or of another, may only be reproduced with the permission of the owner of the material. This website contains copyrighted materials. The Consortium believes that any use of copyrighted material on this site is both permissive and in accordance with the Fair Use doctrine of 17 U.S.C. § 107. If, however, you believe that your intellectual property rights have been violated, please contact the Consortium at info@genderandsecurity.org.

Subscribe to RSS - Economies