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Ecological Economics

Feminist Ecological Economics and Sustainability

Citation:

Perkins, Patricia E. 2007. "Feminist Ecological Economics and Sustainability." Journal of Bioeconomics 9 (3): 227-44. 

Author: Patricia E. Perkins

Keywords: feminist economics, ecological economics, sustainable development, unpaid work, economic valuation, caring labor, material throughput, economic growth, gender equity, social reproduction, local economies, social change, sustaining services, social sustainability, feminism, provisioning, sustainable livelihoods, service sector, quality of life, work time, multi-tasking, discourse-based valuation, community economies, social resilience

Annotation:

Summary:
New developments in feminist ecological economics and ecofeminist economics are contributing to the search for theories and policy approaches to move economies toward sustainability. This paper summarizes work by ecofeminists and feminist ecological economists which is relevant to the sustainability challenge and its implications for the discipline of economics. Both democracy and lower material throughputs are generally seen as basic principles of economic sustainability. Feminist theorists and feminist ecological economists offer many important insights into the conundrum of how to make a democratic and equity-enhancing transition to an economy based on less material throughput. These flow from feminist research on unpaid work and caring labor, provisioning, development, valuation, social reproduction, non-monetized exchange relationships, local economies, redistribution, citizenship, equity-enhancing political institutions, and labor time, as well as creative modeling approaches and activism-based theorizing. (Summary from original source)

Topics: Citizenship, Democracy / Democratization, Economies, Ecological Economics, Informal Economies, Environment, Feminisms, Ecofeminism

Year: 2007

Feminism, Ecology and the Philosophy of Economics

Citation:

Nelson, Julie A. 1997. "Feminism, Ecology and the Philosophy of Economics." Ecological Economics 20 (2): 155-62.

Author: Julie A. Nelson

Abstract:

The contemporary discipline of economics pays little heed to either the natural environment or to the work of women. A review of the literature on the historical development of western concepts of self and science shows that this is not coincidental. Rather than suggesting that ecological economics reinforce the identification of women with nature, however, feminist thought suggests that dualistic thinking about men and women, humans and nature can be should be replaced with a fuller picture of human identity and knowledge.

Keywords: feminism, economics, ecology, philosophy

Topics: Economies, Ecological Economics, Environment, Feminisms, Gender

Year: 1997

Women, Nature and the Social Construction of ‘Economic Man'

Citation:

Mellor, Mary. 1997. “Women, Nature and the Social Construction of ‘Economic Man’.” Ecological Economics 20 (2): 129–40.

Author: Mary Mellor

Abstract:

This paper argues that the social construction ‘economic man’ is the product of a hierarchical dualism in western society that has also created ‘rational man’ and ‘scientific man’. Women and the natural world form the subordinated half of these dualisms. Central to this paper is the claim that this dualism is not only a cultural/theoretical one, but also a material one. The social construction of ‘economic man’ is the product of a bifurcated knowledge system and a materially divided society. ‘Economic man’ reflects a society in which the embeddedness and embodiedness of humanity is hidden by the division of mind from body, and science/culture from the natural world. For this reason it is not possible to incorporate women and nature into the ‘economy’ through the commodity form by according them a value as price. It is argued that the economic system can only exist if women and nature remain externalised, as women form the bridge between an autonomous individualised ‘man’ and the biological/ecological underpinning of his existence. Central to this analysis is the distinction between social and natural/biological time. ‘Economic’ man lives in social time (clock time) while women are responsible for biological time. This is not because women are closer to nature/biology in an essential sense. Rather, this relationship is imposed upon them by a male-dominated society.

Topics: Economies, Ecological Economics, Environment, Gender, Masculinity/ies, Femininity/ies, Gendered Power Relations

Year: 1997

Toward a Sustaining Production Theory

Citation:

O’Hara, Sabine U. 1997. “Toward a Sustaining Production Theory.” Ecological Economics 20 (2): 141–54.

Author: Sabine O’Hara

Abstract:

Production is commonly described as the root of wealth creation, growth and progress. Mainline production theory ascribes this wealth generating ability to a limited number of inputs transformed into equally narrowly defined goods and services. Output which is not part of the official economy's market exchange, or inputs not employed in their production process remain external and unaccounted for. Many of these unaccounted for goods and inputs are provided in households, gardens, subsistence production, or ecological and biophysical systems through the ‘free’ services of women or nature. Thus an alternative view of production is suggested, one which views production itself as linked to the social and bio-physical contexts within which it takes place. This context first makes the generation of input streams, the receiving of output streams and the processing of inputs by means of fund factors (Georgescu-Roegen) possible. As production is contextualized it becomes evident that processes which sustain input generation, waste absorption and material transformation are critical to the production process. These are referred to as sustaining services. A sustaining production process is one which maintains sustaining services instead of destroying them. It is further argued that steps toward the implementation of a sustaining production concept require a move from abstraction to material concreteness. Three areas of concreteness are discussed as moving from solely monetary to physical valuation criteria, moving from methodological homogeneity to diversity, and moving from a mystified and distanced decision making process about quantity and quality of production to one of informed, participatory discourse.

Keywords: production theory, sustainability, ecosystem services, social sustainability, flow/ fund factors, feminist theory

Topics: Economies, Ecological Economics, Informal Economies, Environment, Gender, Women, Gender Roles

Year: 1997

The Triangle of the Human Economy: Household - Cultivation - Industrial Production An Attempt at Making Visible the Human Economy in Toto

Citation:

Pietilä, Hilkka. 1997. “The Triangle of the Human Economy: Household - Cultivation - Industrial Production An Attempt at Making Visible the Human Economy in Toto.” Ecological Economics 20 (2): 113–27.

Author: Hilkka Pietilä

Abstract:

This paper is an attempt at outlining a comprehensive framework within which it would be possible to perceive that the totality of the human economy consists of three distinct components: household, cultivation and industrial production. Each one of these components operates according to its own particular logic. Therefore, the logic of one cannot be imposed on the logic of another without serious consequences — as is now already seen, when the logic of industrial production has hitherto been imposed upon the whole human economy. It is to be hoped that establishing a new, more comprehensive and relevant perception of the human economy as a whole would help humanity to adopt a lifestyle which will provide the prerequisites for a dignified quality of life for all people, with due respect to the ecological boundaries of the biosphere. In this process, a recognition of the economic, social and cultural contribution of women is decisive, as well as a respect for the values and priorities set within women's culture and way of life.

Keywords: women's work, gender and economics, cultivation economy, alternative economics, new theory of economics, economy versus ecology, the human economy, unpaid work and production, household as basic economy

Topics: Economies, Care Economies, Ecological Economics, Environment, Gender, Women, Households

Year: 1997

Making the Hidden Visible: The Importance of Caring Activities and Their Principles for Any Economy

Citation:

Jochimsen, Maren, and Ulrike Knobloch. 1997. “Making the Hidden Visible: The Importance of Caring Activities and Their Principles for Any Economy.” Ecological Economics 20 (2): 107–12.

Authors: Maren Jochimsen, Ulrike Knobloch

Abstract:

In this paper we emphasize the interrelation of the monetary, free-enterprise sector of the economy and its maintaining basis. The current discussion on sustainability has so far placed too little attention on this circumstance. To us this interrelation is fundamental; it is one important key to understanding present day economics and economies. By concentrating on this interrelation we question the widely accepted dualism between the public and the private, between the officially acknowledged economic and the invisible economic. By this we create our own specific approach to the question of how to reform economic thought and action in order to achieve a naturally and socially sustainable living.

Keywords: feminist economics, discoursive ethics, ecological economics, sustainable development, caring economy

Topics: Development, Economies, Care Economies, Ecological Economics, Feminist Economics, Environment, Feminisms

Year: 1997

Economics, Ecology, and Quality of Life: Who Evaluates?

Citation:

O’Hara, Sabine U. 1999. “Economics, Ecology, and Quality of Life: Who Evaluates?” Feminist Economics 5 (2): 83–9.

Author: Sabine U. O'Hara

Abstract:

Measures of the Quality of Life have always raised questions about what indicators and valuation methods best represent human well-being. This paper argues that the “what” is inseparably linked to “who” is included in the selection and valuation process. It is argued that operative biases undervalue and even neglect the most basic aspects of the quality of life, namely those services provided in households, communities and nature which sustain the social and environmental context of human life.

Keywords: feminist methodology, context, local participation, quality of life, sustainability

Topics: Economies, Ecological Economics, Feminist Economics, Environment

Year: 1999

Ecology, Sustainability, and Care: Developments in the Field

Citation:

Nelson, Julie A., and Marilyn Power. 2018. “Ecology, Sustainability, and Care: Developments in the Field.” Feminist Economics 24 (3): 80–8.

Authors: Julie A. Nelson, Marilyn Power

Abstract:

Over the past three decades, scholars and activists have been attempting to enrich the field of economics with both feminist and ecological perspectives. This essay reviews some highlights of such efforts, describes the current state of the field (particularly in regard to notions of “care”), and introduces a short symposium.

Keywords: feminist economics, ecological economics, green economics, gender, care, care work

Topics: Economies, Care Economies, Ecological Economics, Feminist Economics, Environment, Gender

Year: 2018

Between a Rock and a Soft Place: Ecological and Feminist Economics in Policy Debates

Citation:

Nelson, Julie A. 2009. “Between a Rock and a Soft Place: Ecological and Feminist Economics in Policy Debates.” Ecological Economics 69 (1): 1–8. 

Author: Julie A. Nelson

Abstract:

The field of ecological economics includes both economic analysis on the one hand, and discussions of normative values and visions for society, on the other. Using feminist insights into cultural beliefs about the relative “hardness” and “softness” of these two sides, this essay discusses how ecological economists can use this unique “between” space in order to better inform policy. The current crisis of global climate change, it is argued, requires that economists move beyond modeling and measurement, while ecological thinkers need to re-examine beliefs about markets and profit.

Keywords: climate, feminist economics, policy, profit, modeling

Topics: Economies, Ecological Economics, Feminist Economics, Environment, Climate Change, Feminisms, Gender

Year: 2009

What is 'Green' in the Green New Deal - Criteria from Ecofeminist and Post-Keynesian Economics

Citation:

Kesting, Stefan. 2011. "What is 'Green' in the Green New Deal - Criteria from Ecofeminist and Post-Keynesian Economics."International Journal of Green Economics 5 (1): 49-64.

Author: Stefan Kesting

Abstract:

This article aims in general at further fulfilling the ambition of green economics to be a holistic paradigm synthesising and integrating a diverse set of heterodox economic approaches and philosophies. In particular, it addresses the current lack of macroeconomic and more specifically post-Keynesian short run theories in green economies. This new paradigm is in its essence a radical ecofeminist approach to economics. From this vantage point, the ecofeminist framework of (re)productivity developed by Biesecker and Hofmeister is indeed very congruent with green economies. Moreover, the goal of the article is to develop normative (ecofeminist) criteria for green stimulus packages. This could improve green economic policy formulation and real-world implementation [Turk,(2008), p.267].

Keywords: green stimulus, (re)productivity, post-keynesian economics, ecofeminism

Topics: Economies, Ecological Economics, Environment, Feminisms, Ecofeminism

Year: 2011

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