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Climate Change

Mapping a Research Agenda Concerning Gender and Climate Change: A Review of the Literature

Citation:

Moosa, Christina Shaheen, and Nancy Tuana. 2014. “Mapping a Research Agenda Concerning Gender and Climate Change: A Review of the Literature.” Hypatia 29 (3): 677–94.

Authors: Christina Shaheen Moosa, Nancy Tuana

Annotation:

Summary: 
"The collection of papers in this special issue marks the first attempt to bring together feminist philosophical work on the topic of climate change. In this literature review we seek to situate and enlarge upon this work by putting it in conversation with relevant work in climate ethics, in particular, and in feminist philosophy in general. Our goal is to catalyze a robust feminist philosophical research agenda on the pressing and uniquely complex practical problems posed by climate change" (Moosa and Tuana 2014, 677). 
 

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Feminisms, Gender

Year: 2014

Excuse Us, While We Fix the Sky: WEIRD Supermen and Climate Engineering

Citation:

Fleming, Jim. 2017. “Excuse Us, While We Fix the Sky: WEIRD Supermen and Climate Engineering.” RCC Perspectives: Transformations in Environment and Society 4: 23–8.

Author: Jim Fleming

Abstract:

In this paper, Jim Fleming looks at the current state of climate engineering, which, he argues, is in need of critical evaluation given its gendered aspects. Informed by feminist readings, Fleming first presents an overview of the masculinist rhetoric and domination of nature as rooted in Baconian scientific ideals. He continues with a brief sketch of the current state of climate engineering proposals (focusing on solar radiation management), which are dominated by Western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic (WEIRD) men. Fleming concludes that both environmental humanities and social science scholars need to be included in a critical evaluation of the masculinist nature of climate intervention.

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Feminisms, Gender, Masculinity/ies

Year: 2017

Death by Degrees: Taking a Feminist Hard Look at the 2º Climate Policy

Citation:

Seager, Joni. 2009. “Death by Degrees: Taking a Feminist Hard Look at the 2Climate Policy.” Kvinder, Køn & Forskning 3/4: 11–21.

Author: Joni Seager

Abstract:

International policy-makers are forging a consensus that a 2°C rise in global temperature represents an acceptable and manageable level of danger to the planet. This is not a conclusion supported by climate science. Feminist analysis helps to reveal the gendered political and ideological underpinnings of this approach to climate change.

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Femininity/ies

Year: 2009

Gendering Climate Change through the Transport Sector

Citation:

Polk, Merritt. 2009. “Gendering Climate Change through the Transport Sector.” Kvinder, Køn & Forskning 3/4: 73–8.

Author: Merritt Polk

Annotation:

Summary: 
"The most pressing global environmental problem today is climate change. A variety of prominent reports all point to the seriousness and potential catastrophic consequences that will result unless radical changes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions are realized (IPCC 2007; Stern 2006). Despite the visibility of such debates, there is doubt regarding the willingness and ability of present generations to change their current behavior quickly enough to reduce the scope of future catastrophes. Greenhouse gas emissions from the transport sector are a prime example where, both commercial and pri- vate use of fossil fuels are increasing at alarming rates despite international consensus regarding the need for massive reductions. One of the major points of contention stems from global inequalities regarding carbon dioxide emissions. Countries with low per capita levels of fossil fuel use do not see themselves as responsible for climate change and demand the right to continue their carbon based economic development. Highly motorized countries show little success or interest in reducing their greenhouse gas emissions to the extent and in the time frame that may be required. Overall, a radical and immediate reduction of carbon dioxide from the transport sector is not seen as feasible in highly motorized countries, or fair to less motorized ones" (Polk 2009, 73-4). 

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Infrastructure, Transportation

Year: 2009

Gendered Discourse About Climate Change Policies

Citation:

Swim, Janet K., Theresa K. Vescio, Julia L. Dahl, and Stephanie J. Zawadzki. 2018. “Gendered Discourse About Climate Change Policies.” Global Environmental Change 48: 216–25.

Authors: Janet K. Swim, Theresa K. Vescio, Julia L. Dahl, Stephanie J. Zawadzki

Abstract:

Extending theory and research on gender roles and masculinity, this work predicts and finds that common ways of talking about climate change are gendered. Climate change policy arguments that focus on science and business are attributed to men more than to women. By contrast, policy arguments that focus on ethics and environmental justice are attributed to women more than men (Study 1). Men show gender matching tendencies, being more likely to select (Study 2) and positively evaluate (Study 3) arguments related to science and business than ethics and environmental justice. Men also tend to attribute negative feminine traits to other men who use ethics and environmental justice arguments, which mediates the relation between type of argument and men’s evaluation of the argument (Study 3). The gendered nature of public discourse about climate change and the need to represent ethical and environmental justice topics in this discourse are discussed.

Keywords: gender, climate change, political discourse, masculinity, environmental justice

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Masculinity/ies, Gender Roles, Gendered Discourses, Justice

Year: 2018

Indigenous Women, Climate Change Impacts, and Collective Action

Citation:

Whyte, Kyle Powys. 2014. “Indigenous Women, Climate Change Impacts, and Collective Action.” Hypatia 29 (3): 599–616.

Author: Kyle Powys Whyte

Abstract:

Indigenous peoples must adapt to current and coming climate‐induced environmental changes like sea‐level rise, glacier retreat, and shifts in the ranges of important species. For some indigenous peoples, such changes can disrupt the continuance of the systems of responsibilities that their communities rely on self‐consciously for living lives closely connected to the earth. Within this domain of indigeneity, some indigenous women take seriously the responsibilities that they may perceive they have as members of their communities. For the indigenous women who have such outlooks, responsibilities that they assume in their communities expose them to harms stemming from climate change impacts and other environmental changes. Yet at the same time, their commitment to these responsibilities motivates them to take on leadership positions in efforts at climate change adaptation and mitigation. I show why, at least for some indigenous women, this is an important way of framing the climate change impacts that affect them. I then argue that there is an important implication in this conversation for how we understand the political responsibilities of nonindigenous parties for supporting distinctly indigenous efforts at climate change adaptation and mitigation.

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Women, Indigenous Rights

Year: 2014

Inventing Bushcraft: Masculinity, Technology, and Environment in Central Africa, ca. 750-1250

Citation:

de Luna, Kathryn M. 2017. “Inventing Bushcraft: Masculinity, Technology, and Environment in Central Africa, ca. 750-1250.” RCC Perspectives: Transformations in Environment and Society 4: 51–60.

Author: Kathryn M. de Luna

Abstract:

Kathryn M. de Luna explores the micropolitics of knowledge production through a case study of the history of bushcraft. She highlights the special status given to practitioners of bush technologies—specifically Central Eastern Botatwe speakers—in south central Africa. The invention of a new landscape category, isokwe, and the novel status of seasonal technicians marked the development of a virile, sexualized masculinity available to some men; but it was also a status with deeply sensuous, material, and social meanings for women.

Keywords: fishing, gender, hunting, indigenous knowledge, technology

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Masculinity/ies Regions: Africa, Central Africa

Year: 2017

Climate Disaster, Gender, and Violence: Men's Infliction of Harm Upon Women in the Philippines and Vietnam

Citation:

Nguyen, Huong T., and Helle Rydstrom. 2018. “Climate Disaster, Gender, and Violence: Men’s Infliction of Harm Upon Women in the Philippines and Vietnam.” Women’s Studies International Forum 71: 56–62.

Authors: Huong T. Nguyen, Helle Rydstrom

Annotation:

Summary: 
"Drawing on ethnographic material which we have collected in the Philippines and Vietnam in the aftermath of the 2013 typhoons Haiyan (Yolanda) and Nari, we focus on men's violence against women in the domestic sphere prior to and in the wake of a climate disaster. We do so by unfolding women's experiences of being subjected to their male partner's abuse and by examining how gender-based violence is conditioned or fought by agencies and organizations in the two studied settings. We engage with feminist research on climate disaster, gender, and violence to develop an analytical framework to dismantle how indirect systemic harm, or ‘structural violence’, shaped by androcentrism, interacts with direct physical violence through processes of‘rebounding’ (Bloch, 1992; Fraser, 1996; Galtung, 1969). In doing so, we argue for a holistic approach to the study of violence before, during, and after a cataclysmic event. The framework, we suggest, provides a tool to unravel how gender precariousness is fueled and maybe even augmented by a crisis of emergency" (Nguyen and Rydstrom 2018, 56). 

Topics: Domestic Violence, Environment, Climate Change, Environmental Disasters, Gender, Gender-Based Violence, NGOs, Violence Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Philippines, Vietnam

Year: 2018

Can Climate Finance Achieve Gender Equity in Developing Countries?

Citation:

Wong, Sam. 2014. “Can Climate Finance Achieve Gender Equity in Developing Countries?” WIDER Working Paper 2014/064, United Nations University - The World Institute for Development Economics Research, Helsinki. 

Author: Sam Wong

Abstract:

We develop the climate finance-gender equity framework in this paper and use the ‘contextual-procedural-distributive’ equity as a lens of analysis to examine how climate finance helps challenge, and reinforce, gender inequities in the mitigation, adaptation and disaster management strategies. Focusing on the examples of tree-planting, smart-agriculture and disaster information dissemination projects, this paper argues that climate finance can achieve gender equity if three aspects are critically considered: (1) how different incentives and preferences, between men and women, are shaped by their livelihood experiences and priorities, and what factors enable, and restrict, their access to resources; (2) how formal and informal participatory arena offers a genuine space for women, and men, to make decisions that empower them; and (3) how women’s practical and strategic needs are met and the contradictions resolved. This paper also suggests that climate finance needs to address and challenge unequal socio-political arrangements, such as access to land rights, that help perpetuate gender inequities.

Keywords: climate finance, gender equity, access, land rights, Green Climate Fund

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Environmental Disasters, Gender, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equity, Livelihoods, Rights, Land Rights

Year: 2014

Women, Climate Change and Liberation in Africa

Citation:

Steady, Filomina Chioma. 2014. “Women, Climate Change and Liberation in Africa.” Race, Gender & Class 21 (1/2): 312–33.

Author: Filomina Chioma Steady

Abstract:

Women in Africa have been among the first to notice the impact of climate change and its effects on the agricultural cycle, human and animal life; food production and food security. As major custodians and consumers of natural resources, the lives of women in rural areas are profoundly affected by seasonal changes, making them among the most vulnerable to climate change. Their pivotal role in any measure aimed at mitigation and adaptation is indisputable. Despite Africa's minimal emission of green house gases, it is one of the most vulnerable continents to climate change and climate variability and is prone to ecosystem degradation and complex natural disasters. (United Nations Environment Programme, 2006). This article examines women and climate change in Africa as an aspect of Africa's environmental problems. It is argued that the ideologies that drive the exploitation of the earth's resources are linked to the legacy of colonialism and its aftermath of economic globalization. Both have important implications for continuing oppression of the environment and people, with important implications for race, gender and class. Particular attention is given to women in rural areas in Africa, who are the main custodians of environmental conservation and sustainability and who are highly threatened by environmental degradation and climate change. Yet, they are often marginalized from the decision-making processes related to solving problems of Climate Change. The paper combines theoretical insights with empirical data to argue for more attention to women's important ecological and economic roles and comments on the policy implications for Climate Change. It calls for liberation that would bring an end to economic and ecological oppression through climate justice and gender justice.

Keywords: Africa's Vulnerability, women, natural resources, colonial legacies, hazardous waste dumping, land grabs, biofuels, mining, deforestation, liberation, gender justice, climate justice

Topics: Class, Coloniality/Post-Coloniality, Economies, Environment, Climate Change, Environmental Disasters, Gender, Women, Globalization, Justice, Land grabbing, Race Regions: Africa

Year: 2014

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