Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

Central America

Conservation as Enclosure: An Ecofeminist Perspective on Sustainable Development and Biopiracy in Costa Rica

Citation:

Isla, Ana. 2005. “Conservation as Enclosure: An Ecofeminist Perspective on Sustainable Development and Biopiracy in Costa Rica.” Capitalism Nature Socialism 16 (3): 49–61.

Author: Ana Isla

Annotation:

Summary:
"This paper argues that the rhetoric of sustainable development reinforces the power and reach of global capitalism. Using the language of conservation, industry, large environmental NGOs, and local government elites are sacrificing the survival of forest peoples to capital accumulation. Enclosures of common lands for the purpose of bioprospecting liquidate the customary claims of forest ownership. As a result, conservation as enclosure suppresses the human rights of local communities and the rights of nature. In this process, campesinos and indigenous people are impoverished as their local environments move from abundance to scarcity in a commodified world, and they themselves become displaced, marginalized, even criminalized, and unwaged in a waged global world. Women lose their autonomy in gender and development programs that claim to promote equality by including them in the international market. They are pushed into capitalized biotech micro-enterprises, become indebted, overextend their work time, and substitute family food production for the cultivation of medicinal plants—all for less than a minimum wage. By these predatory programs, a vulnerable local nature and vulnerable local women are tied into the world economy, not for conservation or emancipation, but to be exploited for capital accumulation" (Isla 2005, 13-4).

Topics: Development, Environment, Gender, Women, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality, Indigenous, Rights, Human Rights, Indigenous Rights Regions: Americas, Central America Countries: Costa Rica

Year: 2005

Women’s Land Ownership and Relationship Power: A Mixed Methods Approach to Understanding Structural Inequities and Violence against Women

Citation:

Grabe, Shelly, Rose Grace Grose, and Anjali Dutt. 2015. “Women’s Land Ownership and Relationship Power: A Mixed Methods Approach to Understanding Structural Inequities and Violence against Women.” Psychology of Women Quarterly 39 (1): 7–19.

Authors: Shelly Grabe, Rose Grace Grose, Anjali Dutt

Abstract:

Violence against women is a widespread societal problem substantiated and perpetuated through inequities that operate within numerous levels of the society. Challenging and ending gender-based violence therefore requires addressing social structures that perpetuate gendered hierarchies and maintain women’s susceptibility to experiencing violence worldwide. The present study examines novel approaches taken by women in two different countries in the Global South, one in Nicaragua and another in Tanzania, to examine macro-level processes involved in land ownership in regions where owning land is a marker of dominance. Using data from 492 women, results from structural equation models and qualitative thematic analyses demonstrate significant links among women’s ownership of land, relationship power, and receipt of physical and psychological violence in both the countries. Collectively, the findings suggest that when women own land, they gain power within their relationships and are less likely to experience violence. Implications for theoretical conceptualizations of eradicating violence against women and practical interventions are discussed.

Keywords: Intimate partner violence, power, relationship quality, human rights, sexism, ownership, cross-cultural differences

Topics: Gender, Women, Gender-Based Violence, Gendered Power Relations, Rights, Human Rights, Land Rights Regions: Africa, East Africa, Americas, Central America Countries: Nicaragua, Tanzania

Year: 2015

Gender Levees: Rethinking Women’s Land Rights in Northeastern Honduras

Citation:

Casolo, Jennifer. 2009. “Gender Levees: Rethinking Women’s Land Rights in Northeastern Honduras.” Journal of Agrarian Change 9 (3): 392–420. 

Author: Jennifer Casolo

Abstract:

In the aftermath of Hurricane Mitch, one woman’s impassioned speech linking women’s exclusion from land rights with the failings of Honduras’ state-led agrarian reform and counter-reform gathered gale force, simultaneously weakening particular levees of gender-bias while constructing others. Post-Hurricane Mitch organizational practices and reconstruction policies in Northeastern Honduras afforded women access to joint property titles and participation.Yet the practices and processes through which women gained new rights reproduced certain exclusionary gender structures and created new barriers to women’s participation. These contradictory consequences speak to recent feminist assessments of women’s land rights under neo-liberal land titling programmes and a resurgence of policies addressing agrarian reform, and reveal the broader stakes of struggles for women’s land rights. In so doing, they underline the importance of attending to spatial connections and historical articulations between the present and the past, and thus the past and the future.

Keywords: gender, land rights, agrarian reform, disaster, Honduras

Topics: Agriculture, Environment, Environmental Disasters, Gender, Gender Analysis, Women, Rights, Land Rights Regions: Americas, Central America Countries: Honduras

Year: 2009

Contributing to the Construction of a Framework for Improved Gender Integration into Climate-Smart Agriculture Projects Monitoring and Evaluation: MAP-Norway Experience

Citation:

Gutierrez-Montes, Isabel, Maureen Arguedas, Felicia Ramirez-Aguero, Leida Mercado, and Jorge Sellare. 2017. "Contributing to the Construction of a Framework for Improved Gender Integration into Climate-Smart Agriculture Projects Monitoring and Evaluation: MAP-Norway Experience." Climatic Change 158: 93-106.

Authors: Isabel Gutierrez-Montes, Maureen Arguedas, Felicia Ramirez-Aguero , Leida Mercado, Jorge Sellare

Abstract:

The Mesoamerican Agroenvironmental Program (MAP-Norway) is a multi-dimensional rural development program implemented in Central America since 2009, working with smallholder families, producer organizations, governmental organizations, and regional governance platforms. To monitor, assess, and evaluate the effects of the program on its beneficiaries, MAP-Norway uses a series of indicators that allow project managers and donors to adapt and follow-up on the interventions. Because gender is a cross-cutting theme in the program, gender indicators are used at all levels: families, producer organizations, and governmental organizations and governance platforms. In this document, we use the experience of MAP-Norway to critically assess these indicators, considering their potential usability in the monitoring and evaluation of climate-smart agriculture (CSA) initiatives. Furthermore, we propose a series of other indicators that capture various dimensions of gender relations. These indicators can be used to assess the effect of CSA practices, services, and technologies on equity in decision-making, women’s empowerment (including economic empowerment), intra-household food security, and equity in ownership over productive resources, among others, thus providing evidence that can help better design and target CSA interventions.

Topics: Agriculture, Development, Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality, Households, Security, Food Security Regions: Americas, Central America

Year: 2017

A Revolution in the Binary? Gender and the Oxymoron of Revolutionary War in Cuba and Nicaragua

Citation:

Volo, Lorraine Bayard de. 2012. “A Revolution in the Binary? Gender and the Oxymoron of Revolutionary War in Cuba and Nicaragua.” Signs 37 (2): 413-39.

Author: Lorraine Bayard de Volo

Annotation:

The urgency posed by the U.S. “War on Terror” prompted a renewed surge in feminist analyses of war and security, with far-reaching implications for gendered approaches to political violence. The primary focus has been on the United States and its allies. Considerably less attention has been given to smaller nations of the global South, including revolutionary states that resist U.S. neoimperialism. Through the cases of Cuba and Nicaragua, this essay addresses this gap in the literature by training a gender lens on the ways in which the revolutions in smaller nations—first as guerrilla armies, then as revolutionary states—hailed a revolutionary public and discursively engaged with other states by means of certain gendered logics. Gendered analysis of such revolutionary logic is a relatively unexamined means to understand a fuller range of wars and security events. In turn, a focus on armed insurrection and security events of revolution also generates insight into gender relations and efforts at gender equality.

Topics: Gender, Gender Analysis, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Non-State Armed Groups, Security Regions: Americas, Caribbean countries, Central America Countries: Cuba, Nicaragua

Year: 2012

Las violencias contra las mujeres en los textos jurídicos de América Latina y el Caribe

Citation:

Zurbano-Berenguer, Belén, María del Mar García-Gordillo, y Alba Zurbano-Berenguer. 2019. "Las violencias contra las mujeres en los textos jurídicos de América Latina y el Caribe." Estudos Feministas 27 (3): 1-13.

Authors: Belén Zurbano-Berenguer, María del Mar García-Gordillo, Alba Zurbano-Berenguer

Abstract:

SPANISH ABSTRACT:

Este trabajo estudia las diferencias y similitudes que existen en los diferentes textos legales sobre violencias contra las mujeres en el contexto de América Latina y del Caribe. El objetivo de la investigación es contribuir a los análisis jurídicos de las diferentes legislaciones para expandir el conocimiento jurídico y poder realizar apuestas legislativas de calidad. Los resultados de los análisis, que se basan en las terminologías y conceptualizaciones de las violencias por razón de género, muestran una gran heterogeneidad, reflejo de la falta de consenso social sobre este problema. 

PORTUGUESE ABSTRACT:

Este trabalho estuda as diferenças e semelhanças que existem nos diferentes textos legais sobre as violências contra as mulheres no contexto da América Latina e do Caribe. O objetivo da pesquisa é contribuir para a análise jurídica das diferentes legislações para ampliar o conhecimento jurídico e fazer apostas legislativas de qualidade. Os resultados das análises, baseados em terminologias e conceituações de violência de gênero, mostram grande heterogeneidade, reflexo da falta de consenso social sobre esta questão. 

ENGLISH ABSTRACT:

This paper studies the differences and similarities that exist in the different legal texts on violence against women in the context of Latin America and the Caribbean. The objective of the research is to contribute to the legal analysis of the different legislations to expand the legal knowledge and to make quality legislative bets. The results of the analysis, which are based on the terminologies and conceptualizations of gender-based violence, show a great heterogeneity that reflects the lack of social consensus on this problem.

Topics: Gender, Women, Gender-Based Violence, Rights, Women's Rights, Violence Regions: Americas, Caribbean countries, Central America, South America

Year: 2019

Acceso de mujeres indígenas a la tierra, el território y los recursos naturales em América Latina y el Caribe

Citation:

Velásquez Nimatuj, Irma A. 2018. Acceso de mujeres indígenas a la tierra, el território y los recursos naturales em América Latina y el Caribe. Guatemala: Oficina Regional de ONU Mujeres para las Américas y el Caribe; La Paz: Fondo para el Desarrollo de los Pueblos Indígenas de América Latina y el Caribe (FILAC).

Author: Irma A. Velásquez Nimatuj

Abstract:

SPANISH ABSTRACT:
El “Acceso de las mujeres indígenas a la tierra, el territorio y los recursos naturales en América Latina y el Caribe”, elaborado por la Antropóloga Maya K’ichee’, Doctora y Maestra en Antropología Social Irma A. Velásquez Nimatuj, ofrece una panorámica regional sobre la temática junto con casos de estudio y recomendaciones clave. Su elaboración se enmarca en el trabajo de colaboración entre la Oficina Regional de ONU Mujeres para las Américas y el Caribe, y el Fondo para el Desarrollo de los Pueblos Indígenas de América Latina y el Caribe (FILAC), para promover el pleno ejercicio de los derechos de las mujeres indígenas.
El documento ofrece, en primer lugar, un análisis sobre los significados que tienen la tierra, el territorio y los recursos naturales para las mujeres indígenas, seguido de una descripción del estado actual y el marco legal internacional y de derechos de las mujeres indígenas. En segundo lugar describe once casos de estudio de acceso a la tierra, territorios y recursos naturales de las mujeres nasa yuwe (páez) de Colombia, las mujeres mapuches de Chile, las mujeres zapatistas de Chiapas, México, las mujeres indígenas de Paraguay, las mujeres maya-q´eqchi´ de Lote Ocho de Guatemala, las mujeres miskitas de la Costa Atlántica de Nicaragua, las mujeres térraba (teribe o broran) de Costa Rica, el proyecto “mujeres indígenas y gobernanza de la tierra” de ONAMIAP de Perú, las mujeres gunas o kuna de Panamá, las mujeres guaraníes del Chaco boliviano, y las mujeres garífunas de la Costa Caribeña de Honduras. Seguidamente ofrece una descripción sobre los retos que enfrentan las mujeres indígenas para gozar de sus derechos de acceso a la tierra, territorios y recursos naturales, así como una serie de buenas prácticas y recomendaciones. 

Topics: Gender, Women, Rights, Land Rights Regions: Americas, Caribbean countries, Central America, South America Countries: Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Peru

Year: 2018

Tierra para nosotras: Propuestas políticas de las mujeres rurales centroamericanas para el acceso a la tierra

Citation:

Red Centroamericana de Mujeres Rurales Indígenas y Campesinas (RECMURIC). 2015. Tierra para nosotras: Propuestas políticas de las mujeres rurales centroamericanas para el acceso a la tierra. Ciudad de Guatemala: RECMURIC.

Author: Red Centroamericana de Mujeres Rurales Indígenas y Campesinas (RECMURIC)

Annotation:

Resumen:
"Más de diez millones de mujeres rurales viven en El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras y Nicaragua conjuntamente. La mayoría son mujeres campesinas e indígenas que cada día trabajan más de quince horas para asegurar la subsistencia y la alimentación de sus familias, desempeñando un papel fundamental en las frágiles economías rurales de la región. Ellas atienden los huertos familiares, alimentan a los animales, siembran, cosechan y procesan el maíz, recogen la leña, buscan el agua, cuidan de niños y mayores, participan en comités vecinales y a menudo complementan los ingresos familiares con distintos trabajos fuera del hogar.
 
Son las mujeres quienes se ocupan de producir los alimentos básicos para el hogar, y además de asumir tareas clave en las explotaciones familiares han diversificado la producción en sus patios con el fin de producir para el mercado local. Este valioso aporte productivo se suma a las responsabilidades de cuidado de la familia y la participación comunitaria; una triple tarea no remunerada ni tampoco reconocida a pesar de ser esencial para la sobrevivencia familiar, la cohesión social y el bienestar comunitario.
 
El papel de las mujeres rurales como productoras agrícolas no es visible, a pesar de su importantísima contribución a las economías locales y a la seguridad y soberanía alimentaria. El último censo agropecuario de Nicaragua, por ejemplo, apenas contabilizaba 61,000 mujeres productoras agrícolas respecto a una población total de 1,100,000 mujeres rurales.
 
Las cuentas nacionales y las estadísticas de empleo tampoco incluyen en sus cálculos el aporte económico de las mujeres ni las consideran población ocupada. En toda la región de América Latina, de 58 millones de mujeres rurales sólo 17 millones son reconocidas como parte de la población económicamente activa. Esto tiene graves implicaciones cuando tratan de optar a programas estatales de adjudicación de tierras o de fomento productivo" (RECMURIC 2015, 8-9).
 
Tabla de Contenidos:
Prólogo
Introducción 
Resumen ejecutivo
1. Las mujeres y la tierra
1.1 Mujeres, tierra y poder
1.2 Mujeres, tierra y soberanía alimentaria
1.3 Mujeres invisibles
 
2. El acceso de las mujeres a la tierra en Centroamérica
2.1 Reformas Agrarias con exclusión de género
2.2 Las mujeres rurales centroamericanas y el acceso a la tierra
2.3 Barreras de acceso a la tierra para las mujeres centroamericana
 
3. Análisis por país
3.1 Guatemala
Concentración de la tierra en Guatemala
La brecha de género en acceso a la tierra en Guatemala
Barreras culturales, legales e institucionales
Fontierras y las reglas de exclusión no escritas
3.2 Nicaragua
Reforma y Contrarreforma Agraria en Nicaragua
Brecha de género en el acceso a la tierra en Nicaragua
El Programa Hambre Cero o la oportunidad perdida
Barreras legales e institucionales
3.3 El Salvador
Acceso a la tierra en El Salvador
La brecha de género en el acceso a la tierra en El Salvador
Barreras legales e institucionales
3.4 Honduras
Reforma agraria en Honduras y exclusión de las mujeres
Barreras que impiden el acceso de las mujeres a la tierra en Honduras
 
4. Conclusión: Acabar con la desigualdad
 
5. Propuestas de la RECMURIC para que las mujeres campesinas
e indígenas centroamericanas ejerzan su derecho a la tierra
5.1 Propuestas dirigidas a los Estados Centroamericanos
5.2 Propuestas dirigidas al Gobierno de Guatemala
5.3 Propuestas dirigidas al Gobierno de Nicaragua
5.4 Propuestas dirigidas al Gobierno de El Salvador
5.5 Propuestas dirigidas al Gobierno de Honduras 
5.6 Propuestas dirigidas al Sistema de Integración Centroamericana
Bibliografía
Siglas y acrónimos
Anexo 1: Síntesis del marco legal relacionado con el acceso de las mujeres a la tierra
Anexo 2: Indicadores estadísticos 
Anexo 3: Marco metodológico del estudio 

Topics: Agriculture, Economies, Gender, Women, Rights, Land Rights Regions: Americas, Central America Countries: El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua

Year: 2015

Somos tierra, semilla, rebeldía: Mujeres, tierra y territorios en América Latina

Citation:

Korol, Claudia. 2016. Somos tierra, semilla, rebeldía: Mujeres, tierra y territorios en América Latina. Barcelona: GRAIN; Buenos Aires: Biodiversidad en América Latina y el Caribe; América Libre.

Author: Claudia Korol

Annotation:

Resumen:
"El acceso a la tierra es uno de los problemas más graves que enfrentan las mujeres rurales en América Latina y en el mundo, y está en la base de muchos otros problemas “invi- sibles” para la sociedad. Este trabajo intenta analizar esta situación, como uno de los fundamentos materiales y cultu- rales del sistema patriarcal, capitalista y colonial de domi- nación. Intenta también establecer sus implicancias para millones de mujeres en nuestro continente" (Korol 2016, 9).
 
Tabla de contenidos:
1. La tenencia de la tierra de las mujeres en América Latina
Presentación general del tema
Algunos enfoques con los que nos aproximamos a este análisis
 
2. Una perspectiva histórica sobre el problema de la tierra en América Latina
La estructura de tenencia de la tierra: herencia del colonialismo patriarcal capitalista
Reformas agrarias en el siglo XX y en el siglo XXI
La contrarreforma neoliberal
 
3. Las relaciones patriarcales en el campo
El trabajo invisible de las mujeres y la división sexual del trabajo 89 Feminización de la agricultura campesina
El debate sobre el concepto de agricultura campesina
Las mujeres y la agricultura campesina       
El acceso de mujeres a la tierra     
                           
4. Las propuestas de los movimientos populares y de los movimientos feministas      
Reforma Agraria Integral y Popular    
Las mujeres en la Reforma Agraria Integral  
Soberanía alimentaria     
Soberanía alimentaria o seguridad alimentaria     
Las mujeres en la lucha por la Soberanía Alimentaria    
El cuidado de las semillas    
El cuidado de los saberes y de las prácticas     
 
5. Algunas conclusiones y nuevos debates

Topics: Coloniality/Post-Coloniality, Agriculture, Feminisms, Gender, Women, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Land Tenure Regions: Americas, Central America, South America

Year: 2016

Situación de las mujeres indígenas productoras físicas de los territorios indígenas de Coto Brus y Quitirrisí en Costa Rica

Citation:

Herrera, Rebeca Espinoza. 2018. “Situación de las mujeres indígenas productoras físicas de los territorios indígenas de Coto Brus y Quitirrisí en Costa Rica.” Géneros: Revista de investigación y divulgación sobre los estudios de género 23: 79-104.

Author: Rebeca Espinoza Herrera

Abstract:

ENGLISH ABSTRACT:
Women assume a protagonist role in the farming activities such as being actively involved in the farming labor processes, cultivating the land, producing food, being in charge of selling production, and managing the assets; nevertheless, their effort is frequently made invisible and women face many obstacles in the development of their work. This article is a quantitative case study in which the situation of the indigenous women farmers living in the Native Territories of the Huetar Region of Quitirrisí and in Coto Brus, located in Costa Rica, is analyzed using the data in the VI Costa Rican Census of Agriculture. This census was made by the National Census and Statistics Institute (INEC, by its acronym in Spanish) in 2014. The results confirm that these women confront gender gap differences in income, land ownership, technical assistance, and production financing
 
SPANISH ABSTRACT:
Las mujeres asumen un rol protagónico en las actividades agropecuarias; se involucran en los diferentes procesos que implican estas labores, cultivan, producen los alimentos, se encargan de su venta y administran los recursos; pese a esto, su trabajo muchas veces es invisibilizado y para su desarrollo se enfrentan a múltiples obstáculos. Este estudio se aborda desde la metodología cuantitativa, en él se realiza un análisis de la situación de las mujeres indígenas productoras físicas de los territorios indígenas Huetar de Quitirrisí y Coto Brus, a partir de los datos del VI Censo Nacional Agropecuario de Costa Rica, realizado por el Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Cen- sos (INEC) en el año 2014. Los resultados permiten constatar que estas mujeres ex- perimentan brechas de género respecto a los ingresos, tenencia de la tierra, asisten- cia técnica y financiamiento para producir. 

Keywords: mujeres indígenas, tenencia de la tierra, producción agricola, asistencia técnica, financiamiento, indigenous women, land ownership, farming, technical assistance, financing

Topics: Agriculture, Gender, Women, Land Tenure, Indigenous, Livelihoods Regions: Americas, Central America Countries: Costa Rica

Year: 2018

Pages

© 2021 CONSORTIUM ON GENDER, SECURITY & HUMAN RIGHTSLEGAL STATEMENT All photographs used on this site, and any materials posted on it, are the property of their respective owners, and are used by permission. Photographs: The images used on the site may not be downloaded, used, or reproduced in any way without the permission of the owner of the image. Materials: Visitors to the site are welcome to peruse the materials posted for their own research or for educational purposes. These materials, whether the property of the Consortium or of another, may only be reproduced with the permission of the owner of the material. This website contains copyrighted materials. The Consortium believes that any use of copyrighted material on this site is both permissive and in accordance with the Fair Use doctrine of 17 U.S.C. § 107. If, however, you believe that your intellectual property rights have been violated, please contact the Consortium at info@genderandsecurity.org.

Subscribe to RSS - Central America