Women, Ecology and Economics: New Models and Theories

Citation:

Perkins, Ellie. 1997. “Women, Ecology and Economics: New Models and Theories.” Ecological Economics, Women, Ecology and Economics 20 (2): 105–106.

Author: Ellie Perkins

Annotation:

Summary:
“In envisioning a special issue of this journal which would focus on the connections between women, ecology and economics, our initial goal was to provide a forum for discussion around very concrete examples of why women are (and should be!) concerned with ecological economics. Flowing from my initial discussions with several colleagues and students, who all thought such a forum was a great idea and long overdue, a number of specific suggestions emerged.

The Call for Papers mentioned such possible topics as "The parallels between women's work, environmental services and natural resource use with regard to valuation, status as 'externalities,' sustainability, complementarity with financial capital, incorporation in national accounts, etc.; the role of women in creating the conditions for sustainable economies and sustainable trade; women's health as an environmental and economic issue; the economic implications of women's position as environmental stewards, especially in the South; and the impact of globalization on women, from an ecological economics perspective." The journal's editors suggested an additional topic of interest which we listed as 'women and population policy.'

…the degree of complementarity and balance in the work of authors from all over the globe is astounding. While the models differ somewhat in emphasis and form, all those we received take as a starting point the unpaid work which is vitally necessary to build and maintain homes, human relationships, and communities -- and without which there is no 'economy'. ~ Whether her paper is theoretical or empirical, however, each author chooses a unique focus for her inquiry, tracing different ecological connections” (Perkins 1997, 105).

Topics: Economies, Ecological Economics, Environment, Feminisms, Feminist Political Ecology, Feminist Political Economy, Gender, Women

Year: 1997

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