Women and Agricultural Productivity: Reframing the Issues

Citation:

Doss, Cheryl R. 2018. “Women and Agricultural Productivity: Reframing the Issues.” Development Policy Review 36 (1): 35–50.

Author: Cheryl R. Doss

Abstract:

Should agricultural development programmes target women in order to increase productivity? This article analyzes the challenges in distinguishing women's agricultural productivity from that of men. Most of the literature compares productivity on plots managed by women with those managed by men, ignoring the majority of agricultural households in which men and women are both involved in management and production. The empirical studies which have been carried out provide scant evidence for where the returns to projects may be highest, in terms of who to target. Yet, programmes that do not consider gendered responsibilities, resources and constraints, are unlikely to succeed, either in terms of increasing productivity or benefitting men and women smallholder farmers.

Keywords: agricultural policy, developing countries, gender, smallholder farming, Agricultural productivity

Topics: Agriculture, Development, Gender

Year: 2018

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