Uncultivated Biodiversity in Women’s Hand: How to Create Food Sovereignty

Citation:

Patria, Hayu Dyah. 2013. “Uncultivated Biodiversity in Women’s Hand: How to Create Food Sovereignty.” Asian Journal of Women’s Studies 19 (2): 148-61.

Author: Hayu Dyah Patria

Abstract:

Most of the world’s food is grown, collected, and harvested by over 2.5 billion small-scale farmers, pastoralists, forest dwellers and fisherfolk, of which more than half are women. Women’s knowledge and labor play a key role in sustaining the many diverse, local food systems that still exist today throughout the world. Mantasa is an independent organization in Indonesia that works on edible wild plants. Biodiversity is the key to food sovereignty and women are the holders of knowledge and wisdom related to utilization of natural resources for their livelihood. Galengdowo village, discussed here, is a successful case where women use edible wild plants to sustain their food sovereignty.

Keywords: edible wild plants, food sovereignty, women's role, biodiversity, traditional knowledge, Galengdowo village

Topics: Agriculture, Gender, Women, Livelihoods, Security, Food Security Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Indonesia

Year: 2013

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