Gender and Geoengineering

Citation:

Buck, Holly Jean, Andrea R. Gammon, and Christopher J. Preston. 2014. "Gender and Geoengineering." Hypatia 29 (3): 651-69.

Authors: Holly Jean Buck, Andrea R. Gammon, Christopher J. Preston

Abstract:

Geoengineering has been broadly and helpfully defined as “the intentional manipulation of the earth’s climate to counteract anthropogenic climate change or its warming effects” (Corner and Pidgeon 2010, 26). Although there exists a rapidly growing literature on the ethics of geoengineering, very little has been written about its gender dimensions. The authors con- sider four contexts in which geoengineering appears to have important gender dimensions: (1) the demographics of those pushing the current agenda, (2) the overall vision of control it involves, (3) the design of the particular technologies, and (4) whom geoengineering will most affect and benefit. After detailing these four gender dimensions, we consider three ways in which the geoengineering discourse could be enriched if it became more sensitive to issues of gender. These include increasing the focus on the concrete other, recognizing the socially transformative potential of geoengineering technologies, and engaging in value-sensitive design. Although ultimately remaining agnostic on the desirability of geoengineering, the paper brings gender considerations into a discussion from which they have been conspicuously absent.

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender

Year: 2014

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