The Gender and Equity Implications of Land-Related Investments on Land Access, Labour and Income-Generating Opportunities in Northern Ghana: The Case Study of Integrated Tamale Fruit Company

Citation:

King, Rudith, and John Bugri. 2013. “The Gender and Equity Implications of Land-Related Investments on Land Access, Labour and Income-Generating Opportunities in Northern Ghana: The Case Study of Integrated Tamale Fruit Company.” Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

Authors: Rudith King, John Bugri

Annotation:

Summary:
“This report investigates the gender-differentiated implications of agricultural investments in Ghana and at the policies and practices that shape outcomes for women and men. The report draws on a review of the literature on agricultural investments in Ghana and analysis of the relevant policy frameworks, on the one hand; and on fieldwork conducted in late 2011 and early 2012 to investigate the case of the Integrated Tamale Food Company (ITFC), on the other. Gender has been a largely neglected issue in research about agricultural investments. Earlier studies have looked at the social and environmental consequences of large-scale land acquisitions in Ghana. This includes concern for the potential deepening of food insecurity and loss of access to farmland and common pool resources for rural farmers. Others have pointed to the real land governance challenges that these processes pose. Ghana does however have long-standing experience with company-farmer partnerships. One such partnership is the Integrated Tamale Fruit Company (ITFC), a horticulture venture based on a nucleus estate and an outgrower scheme. Under the ITFC model outgrowers retain full control over their land, and mango cultivation for sale through ITFC is limited to 1 acre, in part so as not todisplace domestic food production. Understanding the gender-differentiated implications of the national policy frameworks regulating agricultural investments, of the outcomes of these investments as reflected in the literature, and of the more in-depth case study concerning ITFC can provide insights for international debates about how best to promote more inclusive models of agricultural investment” (King and Bugri 2013, iv).

Topics: Agriculture, Gender, Land grabbing, Livelihoods Regions: Africa, West Africa Countries: Ghana

Year: 2013

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