Gender and Environmental Change in the Developing World

Citation:

Bradshaw, Sarah, and Brian Linneker. 2014. “Gender and Environmental Change in the Developing World.” Working Paper, International Institute for Environment and Development, Human Settlement’s Group, London.  

Authors: Sarah Bradshaw, Brian Linneker

Abstract:

This report reviews the literature and evidence within the fields of gender, climate change and disasters, suggesting that although there are gaps in existing knowledge, policy is often not based on the existing evidence but on stereotypical notions. Drawing lessons from the gender and development literature, it outlines some of the key areas of debate common across the three literatures. In particular how best to ensure the inclusion of women in sustainable development policy so they are served by these policies, rather than being at the service of these policies. It concludes by highlighting gaps in knowledge, noting that studies that look at both climate change and disasters, which consider short and long term climatic risks, are necessary if the issues raised are to be tackled in a way that improves, rather than harms, the position and situation of women. 

Keywords: environmental change, climate change adaptation, disaster risk reduction, policy processes, green economy

Topics: Development, Economies, Environment, Climate Change, Environmental Disasters, Gender, Women

Year: 2014

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