Climate Change and Perceived Vulnerability: Gender, Heritage, and Religion Predict Risk Perception and Knowledge of Climate Change in Hawaii

Citation:

Showalter, Kevin, David López-Carr, Daniel Ervin. 2019. "Climate Change and Perceived Vulnerability: Gender, Heritage, and Religion Predict Risk Perception and Knowledge of Climate Change in Hawaii." Geographical Bulletin 60: 49-71.

Authors: Kevin Showalter, David López-Carr, Daniel Ervin

Abstract:

This study explores climate change related risk perception among residents of the ‘Big Island’ of Hawaii, an environmentally vulnerable region. Adapting established instruments, we investigated potential links among socio-demographic variables, risk perception, and perceived preparedness and knowledge, as they relate to climate change. Results reveal relationships between risk perceptions for climate change and gender, with females significantly more aware of the risks posed by climate change, but less prepared than men. Additionally, indigenous and native respondents felt that climate change events posed more risk and felt less prepared compared to non-indigenous. Results suggest that an understanding of how risk perceptions vary by gender, knowledge, and other lesserexplored demographic factors may enable decision makers to plan and implement more effective mitigation and adaptation measures in the region.

Keywords: climate change, vulnerability, Risk perception, adaptation preparedness, island nations

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Ethnicity, Gender Regions: Americas, North America Countries: United States of America

Year: 2019

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