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  1. Research

    Development in Conflict: The Gender Dimension

    El-Bushra, Judy, and Eugenia Piza-Lopez. 1993. Development in Conflict: The Gender Dimension. Oxford, UK: Oxfam.

    Topics: Armed Conflict, Development, Gender

  2. Research

    Transnational Ruptures: Gender and Forced Migration

    Nolin, Catherine. 2006. Transnational Ruptures: Gender and Forced Migration. Burlington: Ashgate Publishing Company.

    Abstract Available

    Topics: Displacement & Migration, Forced Migration, Gender Regions: Americas, Central America Countries: Guatemala

  3. Research

    Fragments of Development: Nation, Gender, and the Space of Modernity

    Bergeron, Suzanne. 2009. Fragments of Development: Nation, Gender, and the Space of Modernity. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.

    Abstract Available

    Topics: Development, Economies, Gender

  4. Research

    Gender and Feminism in African Development Discourse

    Afonja, Simi. 2005. Gender and Feminism in African Development Discourse. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University: Institute for Advanced Study.

    Topics: Development, Feminisms, Gender Regions: Africa

  5. Research

    Gender, Legitimacy and Patronage-Driven Participation: Fisheries Management in the Tonle Sap Great Lake, Cambodia

    Resurrección, Bernadette P. 2008. “Gender, Legitimacy and Patronage-Driven Participation: Fisheries Management in the Tonle Sap Great Lake, Cambodia.” In Gender and Natural Resource Management: Livelihoods, Mobility and Interventions, edited by Bernadette P. Resurreccion and Rebecca Elmhirst, 151-74. London: Earthscan.

    Topics: Civil Society, Economies, Gender Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Cambodia

  6. Research

    Climate Change and Gender Justice

    Terry, Geraldine, ed. 2009. Climate Change and Gender Justice. Warwickshire: Practical Action Pub.

    Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender

  7. Research

    Engendering the Climate-Change Negotiations: Experiences, Challenges, and Steps Forward

    Hemmati, Minu, and Ulrike Röhr. 2009. “Engendering the Climate-Change Negotiations: Experiences, Challenges, and Steps Forward.” Gender and Development 17 (1): 19–32.

    Abstract Available

    Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender

  8. Research

    Protocols, Treaties, and Action: The ‘Climate Change Process’ Viewed through Gender Spectacles

    Skutsch, Margaret M. 2002. “Protocols, Treaties, and Action: The ‘Climate Change Process’ Viewed through Gender Spectacles.” Gender and Development 10 (2): 30–9.

    Abstract Available

    Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender

  9. Research

    Gender and Climate Change in Australia

    Alston, M. 2011. “Gender and Climate Change in Australia.” Journal of Sociology 47 (1): 53–70.

    Abstract Available

    Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender Regions: Oceania Countries: Australia

  10. Research

    Theorizing African Feminism(s): the 'Colonial' Question

    Mekgwe, Pinkie. 2006. “Theorizing African Feminism(s): the 'Colonial' Question.” QUEST: An African Journal of Philosophy 20 (1-2): 11-22.

    Abstract Available

    Topics: Coloniality/Post-Coloniality, Feminisms, Gender Regions: Africa

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