Bibliographic Resources

The goal of the Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights’ Bibliographic Resources Project is to provide the policy, activist and scholarly communities with access to the findings of the burgeoning academic research in this field. We hope that by providing easier access to the findings of scholarly research, we can:

  • help foster better-informed policymaking;
  • support and inform women activists and NGOs;
  • support innovative research by providing resources for researchers in conflict-afflicted areas who often lack access to the kinds of scholarly resources readily available in well-funded educational institutions.

Some of our bibliographies address topics that are currently at the center of international policy agendas and civil society concern, such as “conflict-related sexual violence”; others attempt to help move the “gender, peace and security” agenda forward by focusing on more cutting-edge topics we think worthy of increased attention, such as feminist analysis of the political-economic dimensions of peacebuilding.

If you are familiar with resources which you think should be included in one of our bibliographic resources, please submit the citation, or, better yet, an annotation, and we will add it to the bibliography, with your name as reviewer.

 

This bibliography was created as part of the Consortium's Feminist Roadmap for Sustainable Peace and Planet (FRSPP) project. Given that climate disruption’s effects are being felt all over the world, it inevitably shapes the context in which any attempt to build sustainable peace takes place, and so any theorizing about how to build and sustain peace must take it into account.This bibliography is meant to serve as an introduction to the academic literature on several key aspects of the relationship between gender and the climate crisis. It is the first of a series of more highly specialized Consortium bibliographies related to climate and environment issues. Others in the series include: “Feminist Engagements with Green New Deals,” “Food Security, Gender and the Climate Crisis,” “Masculinities, the Environment, and Technological ‘Solutions’ to the Climate Crisis,” “Migration, Gender and the Climate Crisis,” “Ecofeminism,” “Environmental Disasters: Gendered Impacts and Responses,” and “Feminist Political Ecology and Feminist Ecological Economics.”The academic resources in this bibliography are divided into four main themes: the gendered impacts of the climate crisis; women’s agency in the face of the climate crisis (including their adaptive capacity and their roles in decision-making processes); the representation of women and the incorporation of gender concerns into research, policymaking and the delivery of climate services; and explicitly feminist analyses of the drivers of the climate crisis and visions for a more sustainable path forwards. Additionally, the bibliography includes a short final section of selected literature published by NGOs, think tanks and policy institutions.Research on the gendered dimensions of the climate crisis commonly seeks to understand the ways in which gendered power relations both shape individuals’ experience of and ability to adapt to the climate crisis, and also reinforce the structures that drive environmental degradation and climate breakdown. This includes analyses of how patriarchal, neoliberal and colonial structures determine access to and control over resources, marginalize the knowledge and agency of certain groups, and exacerbate or perpetuate existing inequalities. But it also includes analysis of the ways the climate crisis creates new openings to disrupt existing hierarchies and reimagine the relationship between humans and the environment.This bibliography was created by the Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights, as part of our Feminist Roadmap for Sustainable Peace and Planet (FRSPP) project. The FRSPP focuses on the transnational economic actors and processes that tend to deepen the inequalities that underlie armed conflicts and to undermine the prospects for peace that is both politically and environmentally sustainable. Its goal is to provide: forward-looking expert knowledge of those processes; analyses of their impacts on gender relations and other structural inequalities underlying armed conflicts; and recommendations for how to engage and modify those processes to be more supportive of the societal transformations critical to building gender-equitable, sustainable peace. Topics addressed in the FRSPP include, inter alia: the economic recovery policy prescriptions of international financial institutions; extractive industries and natural resource policy; land rights, large scale land acquisition and land grabbing; infrastructure reconstruction; and climate disruption.
Topics
Economies, Poverty, Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Political Participation, Security, Human Security

This analysis and bibliography explore the intersections of gender, water infrastructure and development. The document is divided into three major sections. Section One, “Mapping the Terrain: An Overview of the Gender, Water Infrastructure and Development Literature,” provides a brief analytic mapping of the various approaches researchers have taken to exploring the relationships of gender, water infrastructure, and different visions of development. Section Two, “A Conceptual Guide to the Bibliography,” details the major questions addressed and analytic frameworks employed by these researchers; its organization mirrors and explicates the structure of the bibliography. Section Three is the Annotated Bibliography itself.   It is important to note that the research literature on this topic is vast, diverse, and not always easy to categorize. Further, categorization is always an interpretive process, and readers with different backgrounds and different intellectual bents would likely come up with very different results. In this case, the field mapping and conceptual organization of the bibliography are the work of Consortium Research Intern Mansi Hitesh.   The bibliography itself is divided into five parts; the first four center academic research in this field, and the fifth contains selected non-academic resources. More specifically:   • Part I, which is the most extensive, focuses on the gender-differentiated ways in which women and men access, use and manage water, as well as on the gender-inequitable impacts of water infrastructure projects.   • Part II contains sources that focus on women’s participation and representation in water resource governance; some also apply a critical feminist lens to the liberal frameworks used to frame the mainstream participation discourse.   • Sources in Part III contest the importance of participatory reforms, and focus instead on larger structural causes of intersectional inequalities in access to water, such as the privatization and commodification of water supply and management.   • Part IV explores Feminist Political Ecology (FPE) as a powerful analytic tool in creating a sustainable, feminist approach to the politics of water infrastructure development.   • Part V contains selected non-academic sources on water/water infrastructure and gender.   Consortium interns Katie Rose Parsons, Mansi Hitesh, Zena Wolf, Brittany Dhooge, Marium Sultan, Morgan Peterson, and Laura Beth Hooper undertook the primary research for this bibliography, with additional contributions from Jessica Tueller, Jana Kanaan and Eva Bianco, as well as Consortium staff members.   This bibliography was created by the Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights as part of our Feminist Roadmap for Sustainable Peace and Planet ( project. The FRSPP starts with the perception that postwar transitions and the sustainability of pea ce itself are often undermined by transnational political economic actors and processes. Its goal is to provide: forward looking expert knowledge of those processes; analyses of their impacts on gender relations and other structural inequalities underlying armed conflicts; and recommendations for how to engage and modify those processes to be more supportive of the societal transformations critical to building gender equitable, sustainable peace. Topics addressed in the FRSPP include, inter alia the econom ic recovery policy prescriptions of international financial institutions; extractives; land rights, large scale land acquisition and land grabbing; infrastructure reconstruction; and climate disruption.
Topics
Development, Feminisms, Feminist Political Ecology, Gender, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality, Gender Equity, Governance, Infrastructure, Water & Sanitation, Privatization

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