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Bibliographic Resources

The goal of the Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights’ Bibliographic Resources Project is to provide the policy, activist and scholarly communities with access to the findings of the burgeoning academic research in this field. We hope that by providing easier access to the findings of scholarly research, we can:

  • help foster better-informed policymaking;
  • support and inform women activists and NGOs;
  • support innovative research by providing resources for researchers in conflict-afflicted areas who often lack access to the kinds of scholarly resources readily available in well-funded educational institutions.

Some of our bibliographies address topics that are currently at the center of international policy agendas and civil society concern, such as “conflict-related sexual violence”; others attempt to help move the “gender, peace and security” agenda forward by focusing on more cutting-edge topics we think worthy of increased attention, such as feminist analysis of the political-economic dimensions of peacebuilding.

If you are familiar with resources which you think should be included in one of our bibliographic resources, please submit the citation, or, better yet, an annotation, and we will add it to the bibliography, with your name as reviewer.

 

The power of art is critical because it can push the boundaries of experience for which there might not yet be language; as Angela Davis has said, “Artists, whether they be musicians or visual artists or literary artists, are often our beacon in times of struggle. Art can educate the imagination.” This quality of art enables potent challenges to western, masculinist, colonial epistemology. In this bibliography, the Consortium includes research on artists grappling with gender, conflict and human rights violations, as well as coloniality and postcoloniality, Orientalism and the War on Terror, and feminist activist performance art.
Topics
Coloniality/Post-Coloniality, Conflict, Terrorism

The Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights created this bibliography to provide a guide to the landscape of gendered research on the disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration process in Colombia, including both Spanish and English language sources. Our goal is to provide the policy, activist and scholarly communities with improved access to the findings of academic research, as well as to a curated selection of the extensive resources produced by NGOs, policy agencies and international organizations.Topics addressed in this bibliography include: the gender dimensions of DDR for Colombian guerillas and paramilitaries; the relationship between gender, DDR and Transitional Justice; masculinities in a DDR context; the impact of DDR on women’s security; and the DDR process for female ex- combatants.Entries include citations, and, insofar as possible, abstracts or summaries. When a Spanish language source provided an English translation of the title and abstract, we included it here verbatim. When a Spanish language source did not include an English translation, one is provided by the Consortium. Similarly, the Consortium has provided Spanish translations of the titles and abstracts of English language sources.***El Consorcio sobre el Género, la Seguridad y los Derechos Humanos creó esta bibliografía para ofrecer un amplio panorama de la investigación sobre el proceso de desarmamento, desmovilización y reintegración en Colombia, incluyendo fuentes en español y en inglés. Nuestro objetivo es dar acceso mejorado a los hallazgos de la investigación académica a las comunidades políticas, activistas y académicas, asi como también a una selección privilegiada de fuentes extensas y valiosas producidas por agencias políticas, ONGs y organizaciones internacionales. Los temas abordados son: la dimensión de género en el DDR para las guerillas Colombianas y paramilitares; la relación entre género, DDR y justicia en transición; las masculinidades en el contexto de DDR; el impacto de DDR en la seguridad de las mujeres; y el proceso de DDR para las mujeres ex–combatientes. Las referencias bibliográficas contienen citaciones y, en la medida en que sea posible, resúmenes. Cuando la fuente en español incluye una traducción en inglés del título y del resumen, el Consorcio no hizo ninguna modificación. Sin embargo, cuando no encontrábamos una traducción en inglés, el Consorcio se encargaba de elaborarla. Así mismo, el Consorcio ha brindado traducciónes en español para los títulos y resúmenes de las fuentes en inglés.
Topics
Combatants, Female Combatants, DDR, Gender, Justice, Transitional Justice, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Paramilitaries, Security
Regions
Americas, South America
Countries
Colombia

The Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights created this bibliography to provide a guide to the landscape of academic literature on ecofeminism, although there is also a brief final section of non-academic sources. This bibliography includes foundational texts in the field, critical discourse on the field, and exploration of fields in conversation with ecofeminism, including: ecological feminism; feminist environmentalism; critical ecological feminism; critical feminist eco-socialism; gender and the environment; queer ecologies; global feminist environmental justice; and ecowomanism, which “centers the perspectives of women of African descent and reflects upon these women's activist methods, religious practices, and theories on how to engage earth justice. As a part of the womanist tradition, methodologically ecowomanism features race, class, gender intersectional analysis to examine environmental injustice around the planet” (Harris 2016). With a few exceptions, this bibliography does not cover ecofeminist literary criticism, nor does it cover the ecofeminist animal rights discourse. The Consortium has produced a separate bibliography on the interrelated fields of Feminist Political Ecology and Feminist Ecological Economics.The ecofeminist movement is generally thought of as having originated in the mid-1970s, gaining traction in the 1980s and 1990s, and experiencing renewed interest in recent years. Though there have been a range of ideological differences over the course of ecofeminist thought – including cultural ecofeminism and social ecofeminism (encompassing materialist and Marxist ecofeminism) – the movement is rooted in identifying the systemic links between the oppression of women and the degradation of the planet. The early ecofeminist movement was critiqued as essentialist and lacking intersectionality, but contemporary ecofeminism exposes, rejects and devises alternatives to the patriarchal, capitalist and colonialist binaries that construct, reproduce and justify the subjection of both nature and marginalized groups. While incorporating a diverse range of trends and orientations, this evolution of ecofeminist thought broadly centers on the premise that the domination and exploitation of women and nature is historically, materially and symbolically linked.This bibliography was created by the Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights, as part of our Feminist Roadmap for Sustainable Peace and Planet (FRSPP) project. The FRSPP focuses on the transnational economic actors and processes that tend to deepen the inequalities that underlie armed conflicts and to undermine the prospects for peace that is both politically and environmentally sustainable. Its goal is to provide: forward-looking expert knowledge of those processes; analyses of their impacts on gender relations and other structural inequalities underlying armed conflicts; and recommendations for how to engage and modify those processes to be more supportive of the societal transformations critical to building gender-equitable, sustainable peace. Topics addressed in the FRSPP include, inter alia: the economic recovery policy prescriptions of international financial institutions; extractive industries and natural resource policy; land rights, large scale land acquisition and land grabbing; infrastructure reconstruction; and climate disruption.
Topics
Environment, Feminisms, Ecofeminism, Gender

This bibliography aims to provide a guide to the landscape of research-based knowledge on the relationship between energy infrastructure and gender. It is divided into thematically into five sections; each theme is further divided into sub-sections, the first devoted to academic research and the second collecting some of the valuable literature emerging from NGOs, think tanks, policy institutions and international organizations.The first and largest section of the bibliography concerns gendered access to and consumption of energy. It includes resources on gendered energy poverty and the relationships between climate crisis outcomes and equitable energy access and consumption, or lack thereof. The second section covers gender in relation to renewable energy industries and policy (solar, wind, hydroelectric, carbon reduction, etc.). This literature includes resources on the challenges and opportunities for gender equity presented by transitions to lowcarbon energy systems. The section also contains several resources that focus on women’s entrepreneurship and leadership in renewable energy and energy policy, presenting both liberal, participatory approaches and more structural and transformative ones. The third section highlights an important and emerging body of literature on Indigenous communities, gender, and energy. These resources underscore the importance of Indigenous women’s participation in energy management decisions and policy. The fourth section contains resources that bring a feminist power analysis to issues of gender in energy infrastructure and that critique mainstream gender and energy studies. The fifth section compiles resources about gender in energy policy, programming, and research. This includes policy recommendations regarding gender in energy infrastructure, writing stressing the importance of gender-diversity in formal energy infrastructure decision-making bodies, and evaluations of past energy-focused research and programs.This bibliography was created by the Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights, as part of our Feminist Roadmap for Sustainable Peace and Planet (FRSPP) project. The FRSPP focuses on the transnational economic actors and processes that tend to deepen the inequalities that underlie armed conflicts and to undermine the prospects for peace that is both politically and environmentally sustainable. Its goal is to provide: forward-looking expert knowledge of those processes; analyses of their impacts on gender relations and other structural inequalities underlying armed conflicts; and recommendations for how to engage and modify those processes to be more supportive of the societal transformations critical to building gender-equitable, sustainable peace. Topics addressed in the FRSPP include, inter alia: the economic recovery policy prescriptions of international financial institutions; extractive industries and natural resource policy; land rights, large scale land acquisition and land grabbing; infrastructure reconstruction; and climate disruption.
Topics
Environment, Feminisms, Gender, Indigenous, Infrastructure, Energy

This bibliography was created as part of the Consortium's Feminist Roadmap for Sustainable Peace and Planet (FRSPP) project. It includes resources on gendered impacts of and responses to environmental disasters, as well as gendered approaches to disaster risk reduction (DRR). This bibliography is a collection of academic and non-academic sources that explore the gendered nature of environmental disasters—mostly, but not exclusively, in war-affected settings. Insofar as possible, entries include citations, published abstracts, and quotations of key sentences (indicated in quotation marks, and followed by page number). Books are briefly summarized, with the table of contents included.The existing literature includes resources on gendered impacts of and responses to environmental disasters, as well as gendered approaches to disaster risk reduction (DRR).Much of the literature analyzes environmental disasters’ gender-differentiated impacts. Here, the academic sources often explore case studies that have shown that women and girls face different, and added, consequences of disasters than men and boys do.The second focus of the literature is on responses to environmental disasters, and it explores how the local, regional, national and international response to environmental disasters tends to be highly gendered, often with negative consequences for women and girls.Third, some of the literature also explores the concept of “Disaster Risk Reduction” (DRR), which addresses projects or potential plans for decreasing the negative effects of environmental disasters on the population and/or for preventing environmental disasters from occurring as frequently.This bibliography was created by the Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights, as part of our Feminist Roadmap for Sustainable Peace and Planet (FRSPP) project. The FRSPP starts with the perception that postwar transitions and the sustainability of peace itself are often undermined by transnational political economic actors and processes. Its goal is to provide: forward-looking expert knowledge of those processes; analyses of their impacts on gender relations and other structural inequalities underlying armed conflicts; and recommendations for how to engage and modify those processes to be more supportive of the societal transformations critical to building gender-equitable, sustainable peace. Topics addressed in the FRSPP include, inter alia: the economic recovery policy prescriptions of international financial institutions; extractives; land rights, large scale land acquisition and land grabbing; infrastructure reconstruction; and climate disruption.
Topics
Environment, Environmental Disasters, Gender, Women, Livelihoods, Post-Conflict, Rights, Women's Rights, Security

This bibliography was created as part of the Consortium's Feminist Roadmap for Sustainable Peace and Planet (FRSPP) project. It starts with an analytical summary of the feminist literature assessing the transformative potential of the SDGs.The bibliography itself is split into two sections. The first section provides a bibliography of the feminist academic literature on the SDGs; the second provides a bibliography of feminist analyses from NGOs and policy institutions. We have also included a few assessments that, although critical, lack a focus on gender issues. Insofar as possible, all entries include citations and abstracts or summaries. This bibliography was created by the Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights, as part of the Feminist Roadmap for Sustainable Peace and Planet (FRSPP) project. The FRSPP starts with the perception that postwar transitions and the sustainability of peace itself are often undermined by transnational political economic actors and processes. Its goal is to provide: forward-looking expert knowledge of those processes; analyses of their impacts on gender relations and other structural inequalities underlying armed conflicts; and recommendations for how to engage and modify those processes to be more supportive of the societal transformations critical to building gender-equitable, sustainable peace. Topics addressed in the FRSPP include, inter alia: the economic recovery policy prescriptions of international financial institutions; extractives; land rights, large scale land acquisition and land grabbing; infrastructure reconstruction; and climate disruption.
Topics
Development, Economies, Economic Inequality, Feminisms, Gender, Women, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality, Justice, Rights, Women's Rights, Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

The Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights created this Annotated Bibliography for the Women’s Regional Network (WRN).  WRN aims to provide an opportunity for key women leaders in Afghanistan, Pakistan and India to unify efforts across borders and to build a common vision to address issues they face in trying to secure peace and stability in the region. The Network is especially concerned with the inter-linkages between security, extremisms, corruption and militarization, including the militarization of aid and development as they impact women’s lives.  WRN commissioned this annotated bibliography, which maps recent studies, reports and other materials on these topics, in order to enable WRN members and partners to become familiar with the current discourse and evidence related to these themes.This bibliography is by no means an exhaustive listing; among its limitations, it is restricted to articles published in English. Insofar as possible, entries includes citations, published abstracts, quotations of key sentences (indicated in quotation marks, and followed by page number) and additional annotations by the interns who worked on this bibliography, and URLs for articles that are available on line. Books usually are only briefly summarized, often with the table of contents included. This annotated bibliography is meant to introduce readers to the landscape of academic research and debate in this field, and to help support the reader in her or his own research. Despite the inclusion of quotations and page numbers in the annotations, we strongly advise the reader not to quote directly from this document, but rather to use it to direct you to the literature that will be of use to you.
Topics
Armed Conflict, Corruption, Economies, Gender-Based Violence, Governance, Humanitarian Assistance, Justice, Militarization, Nationalism, Rights, Women's Rights, Security, Human Security, Security Sector Reform, Sexual Violence, Weapons /Arms

This bibliography was created as part of the Consortium’s Feminist Roadmap for Sustainable Peace and Planet (FRSPP) project. The bibliography surveys the existing research; the Consortium aims to build upon this literature as we explore the ways that a gendered approach to public finance can strengthen politically, socially and environmentally sustainable peacebuilding. Gender Responsive Budgeting (GRB) is a gender mainstreaming tool used to make gendersensitive budget analyses and to formulate gender-sensitive budgets and policies. Sometimes also known as “Gender Budgeting,” Gender Responsive Budgeting is a “strategy premised on the idea that budgets are not gender neutral and that the choices governments make about how to raise and distribute resources can reinforce, maintain or reduce gender inequality” (Elson 2012).GRB should be understood as only one part of a larger topic, which is Gender and Public Finance. Public finance refers to the ways in which government generate, allocate and spend funds. It is crucial that aspects of public finance beyond budgeting be subjected to the same kinds of feminist analytic curiosity that has productively illuminated budgeting. The implications of linking public finance and gender are wide and deep, from opening more acute ways of thinking about post-conflict reconstruction or financing for development, to deconstructing unpaid labor. We hope that this bibliography, which includes the few sources we could find that treat both GRB and Gender and Public Finance as a whole, will be taken as a starting point for researching these intricate questions.Section I of this bibliography provides a guide to the academic literature on GRB and on Gender and Public Finance. However, much of the literature on GRB comes from the policy realm, created or commissioned by institutions such as the United Nations, the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund, so we include some key pieces of the policy literature in Section II. The reader will note that a substantial number of the authors who work in this field are represented in both sections.Rather than an exhaustive list of sources pertaining to the field, this bibliography is a curated resource meant to introduce readers to both the key concepts of and critical approaches to GRB and Gender and Public Finance. Throughout, resources that are especially useful as introductions to the topic are indicated with two asterisks (**).This bibliography was created by the Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights, as part of the Feminist Roadmap for Sustainable Peace and Planet (FRSPP) project. The FRSPP starts with the perception that postwar transitions and the sustainability of peace itself are often undermined by transnational political economic actors and processes. Its goal is to provide: forward-looking expert knowledge of those processes; analyses of their impacts on gender relations and other structural inequalities underlying armed conflicts; and recommendations for how to engage and modify those processes to be more supportive of the societal transformations critical to building gender-equitable, sustainable peace. Topics addressed in the FRSPP include, inter alia: the economic recovery policy prescriptions of international financial institutions; extractives; land rights, large scale land acquisition and land grabbing; infrastructure reconstruction; and climate disruption.
Topics
Economies, Public Finance, Feminisms, Gender, Women, Gender Budgeting, Governance, Post-Conflict Governance, International Financial Institutions, Post-Conflict

This bibliography aims to provide a guide to the landscape of research on land grabbing, large-scale land acquisition (LSLA) and gender. This bibliography is primarily comprised of academic literature but includes a non-comprehensive selection of non-academic resources, such as research from international organizations and NGOs.This bibliography not only compiles literature on gendered vulnerabilities to land grabbing and LSLA, including women’s insecure land tenure, whether customary or statutory (also addressed in the Consortium’s “Land Tenure and Gender” bibliography); it also addresses gendered implications of land grabs, including inequalities in labor, leadership and compensation. This bibliography draws a distinction between the broader questions of land rights (for resources on land rights, see the Consortium’s “Land Rights and Gender” bibliography) and those of land grabbing and LSLA, underscoring how the systems and institutions that benefit from such control rely on distinctly gendered distributions of power.Though “land grabbing” and “large-scale land acquisition” are terms that are used to refer to largely the same phenomenon, “large-scale land acquisition” is the term more frequently used in academic scholarship on the topic, while NGOs and activists critiquing this phenomenon more often use “land grabbing.” In the compilation of this bibliography, the Consortium used a guiding definition of land grabbing as: “…the control (whether through ownership, lease, concession, contracts, quotas, or general power) of larger than locally-typical amounts of land by any person or entity (public or private, foreign or domestic) via any means (‘legal’ or ‘illegal’) for purposes of speculation, extraction, resource control or commodification at the expense of peasant farmers, agroecology, land stewardship, food sovereignty and human rights” (Eco Ruralis 2016).Bringing a feminist lens to this topic, this bibliography not only compiles literature on gendered vulnerabilities to land grabbing and LSLA, including women’s insecure land tenure, whether customary or statutory (also addressed in the Consortium’s “Land Tenure and Gender” bibliography); it also addresses gendered implications of land grabs, including inequalities in labor, leadership and compensation.This bibliography was created by the Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights, as part of our Feminist Roadmap for Sustainable Peace and Planet (FRSPP) project. The FRSPP focuses on the transnational economic actors and processes that tend to deepen the inequalities that underlie armed conflicts and to undermine the prospects for peace that is both politically and environmentally sustainable. Its goal is to provide: forward-looking expert knowledge of those processes; analyses of their impacts on gender relations and other structural inequalities underlying armed conflicts; and recommendations for how to engage and modify those processes to be more supportive of the societal transformations critical to building gender-equitable, sustainable peace. Topics addressed in the FRSPP include, inter alia: the economic recovery policy prescriptions of international financial institutions; extractive industries and natural resource policy; land rights, large scale land acquisition and land grabbing; infrastructure reconstruction; and climate disruption.
Topics
Gender, Women, Gendered Power Relations, Land Grabbing, Land Tenure, Rights, Land Rights

The Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights created this bibliography to provide a guide to the landscape of research-based knowledge of LGBTQ+ people in militaries, wars and post-war settings.The existing literature on LGBTQ+ people and armed conflict divides roughly into two categories. The first, and the focus of much of the academic research, concerns LGBTQ+ individuals’ experiences serving in state militaries. Much of this research addresses the United States military’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy, but the policies of and experiences in other countries are examined as well. While some of the literature focuses on the experiences of LGBTQ+ service members themselves, including the complex ways they are impacted by militaries’ longtime dependence on and production of specific ideas about gender, other literature focuses on military institutions, addressing the imagined and actual impacts of LGBTQ+ inclusive policies on operational effectiveness and unit cohesion.The second focus concerns the experiences of civilian LGBTQ+ people in war and postwar settings. Here, the existing literature examines issues such as: the persecution of LGBTQ+ individuals (for example, in Colombia, Iraq, and Russia); homophobic sexual violence and torture committed against men; and the experiences of LGBTQ+ refugees and asylumseekers. Academic research on this topic is still relatively scarce. Therefore, although Consortium bibliographies are primarily focused on academic research, in this case we have decided to include sections for non-academic resources including reports from human rights organizations, newspaper articles, and blog posts.Entries in this bibliography include citations, and, insofar as possible, abstracts or summaries. Books usually are only briefly summarized, but often include the table of contents.
Topics
LGBTQ, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Post-Conflict

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