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Consortium Speaker Series

The Consortium's Speaker Series brings an international roster of frontline practitioners, reflective activists and engaged scholars to University of Massachusetts Boston's campus. Their talks address the complex realities of women’s and men’s lives and livelihoods in conflict-affected areas, the challenges of trying to bring feminist commitments into security policy and humanitarian practice, and the ways in which gender analysis can and must transform resolutely “gender-blind” paradigms of conflict resolution and peacebuilding. Information about Upcoming Speaker Events, Events Earlier This Year, and Past Speaker Events is available here. You can find videos or transcripts of these events, when available, under Consortium Lectures.

Upcoming Speaker Events

Black Feminist Ecological Perspectives

Kishi Animashaun Ducre
Associate Dean of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion; Associate Professor, Department of African American Studies, Syracuse University
Tiya Miles
Professor, Department of History, Harvard University
Frances Roberts-Gregory
Future Faculty Fellow, School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University

March 11, 2021
4:00pm - 6:00pm

Zoom Webinar

RSVP

Join the Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights for the first panel of our Spring 2021 Speaker Series. Registration is required.
 
Harriett Tubman is DOPE
Kishi Animashaun Ducre, Associate Dean of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion; Associate Professor, Department of African American Studies, Syracuse University
 
My short presentation focuses on what we can learn about the Black Feminist Spatial Imagination and fugitive geographies from the life and times of Harriett Tubman. I will highlight scholarship on Tubman that emphasizes her contributions to peace and liberation beyond her exploits on the Underground Railroad.
 
Black Women and the Nature of Fugitivity
Tiya Miles, Professor, Department of History, Harvard University
 
Early thinkers in the Black feminist literary tradition worked with the materiality and symbolism of nature to imagine as well as to enact free lives. Can their form of environmental consciousness, forged in the fires of slavery, speak to today’s existential threats?
 
Black Feminist Activist Research for Environmental, Energy, and Climate Justice
Frances Roberts-Gregory, Future Faculty Fellow, School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University
 
Drawing upon my fieldwork eco-memories, I reflect upon the potential for feminist activist research and ecowomanism to address longstanding environmental racism and racialized health disparities in the Louisiana Gulf Coast.
 
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This webinar is part of the Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights’  Spring 2021 Speaker Series. It is also affiliated with the Becoming Liberated & Knowledgeable (BLK) Conference, which is organized by students at University of Massachusetts Boston and will take place on February 27, 2021.
 
This webinar is being co-sponsored by the University of Massachusetts Boston's Department of Anthropology; Department of Conflict Resolution, Human Security and Global Governance; Department of Economics; History Department; Philosophy Department; Political Science Department; Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies Department and Human Rights Minor; the Honors College; the School for Global Inclusion and Social Development; and the John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies.

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