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United States of America

When Are States Hypermasculine?

Citation:

Maruska, Jennifer Heeg. 2010. “When Are States Hypermasculine?” In Gender and International Security: Feminist Perspectives, edited by Laura Sjoberg, 235-55. Oxon: Routledge.

Author: Jennifer Heeg Maruska

Annotation:

Summary: 
"By using gender as a theoretical tool, I will demonstrate how American hegemonic masculinity—or a significant subsection of it—became hypermasculine in the days, months, and years following September 11, 2001. This development is key to understanding how the war Iraq was sold to and bought by the American people. The consequences of this hypermasculinity include popular support for the March 2003 invasion of Iraq as well as the re-election of President George W. Bush in 2004. In this chapter, I will elaborate the concepts of hegemonic masculinity and hypermasculinity, based on previous theorizing (largely by R. W. Connell and Charlotte Hooper). I will then apply these principles to the post-9/11 era, suggesting that both the Bush administration (the agent) and American mainstream culture itself (the structure) contributed to the invasion of Iraq. By applying a gender-sensitive lens, and putting hypermasculinity into a historical context, both the decision to invade Iraq and the popular support such an idea received will be made much clearer" (Maruska 2010, 236).

Topics: Gender, Masculinity/ies, Gender Analysis, Gendered Discourses, Gendered Power Relations, Security Regions: Americas, North America, Asia, Middle East Countries: Iraq, United States of America

Year: 2010

Tales of the Shield: A Feminist Reading of Ballistic Missile Defence

Citation:

Masters, Cristina. 2003. “Tales of the Shield: A Feminist Reading of Ballistic Missile Defence.” YCISS Working Paper 23, York Centre for International and Security Studies, York University, Ontario.

Author: Cristina Masters

Annotation:

Summary: 
“Prior to September 11th – the date by which we now frame discussions – debates around missile defence, whether national or transnational, were framed around two central points: what I call the ‘can it work’ and ‘should we or should we not do it’ debates. In regards to the first debate, the questions have been around the technological feasibility of a ballistic missile defence system. With one side arguing that it can in fact work if the commitment of time and money is put in, and the other side arguing that not only will the cost be prohibitive, but more importantly, the technological capabilities are not available even if the budget commitments are. Moreover, the time frame of putting in place even a limited ballistic missile defence system – a minimum of ten years but most likely in the 20-25 year range – undermines the stated urgency of the program (Folger 2001; Sirak 2001). The second debate, while concerned with the technological feasibility of missile defence, has been more focussed on the ‘politics’ of ballistic missile defence with the central questions being whether or not the threat of missile attack by ‘rogue’ states is indeed real or sufficient enough to warrant the construction of a defence shield (Harvey 2000; Mutimer 2001). This debate has also raised questions concerning what the effects will be as a consequence of proceeding to a missile defence program, with the potential of setting off an international arms race with China and Russia at the forefront” (Masters 2003, 1).

Topics: Armed Conflict, Gender, Weapons /Arms Regions: Americas, North America Countries: United States of America

Year: 2003

Gender and States

Syllabus: 
AttachmentSize
File Hill_-_Gender_and_States_.docx920.43 KB
Year course was taught: 
2017

Global Gender Politics

Syllabus: 
AttachmentSize
PDF icon Runyan_-_Global_Gender_Politics_.pdf275.14 KB
Year course was taught: 
2018

War and Gender

Syllabus: 
AttachmentSize
File Gallagher_-_War_and_Gender.docx633.19 KB
Year course was taught: 
2018

Pages

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