Philippines

Gendered Impacts of Commercial Pressures on Land

Citation:

Daley, Elizabeth. 2010. Gendered Impacts of Commercial Pressures on Land. Rome: International Land Coalition.

Author: Elizabeth Daley

Abstract:

This paper contains a careful and focused analysis of the gendered impacts of commercial pressures on land (CPL), and especially their impacts on women. It is based on a review of the literature on CPL to date and an analysis from a gender perspective of International Land Coalition country case studies carried out in India, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Ethiopia, Zambia, Rwanda and Benin. Arguing that women are both likely to be affected differently from men by large-scale land deals and disproportionately more likely to be negatively affected than men because they are generally vulnerable as a group, the paper provides recommendations as to how tools and procedures envisaged by proposed regulatory frameworks must be locally appropriate and must specifically address all four aspects of women’s vulnerability with respect to CPL: productive resources, participation in decision-making, relative income poverty and physical vulnerability. (International Land Coalition)

Topics: Extractive Industries, Gender, Gender Analysis, Gender-Based Violence, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality, Land Grabbing, Multi-National Corporations, Rights, Land Rights, Women's Rights, Sexual Violence, SV against Women, Violence Regions: Africa, Central Africa, East Africa, Southern Africa, West Africa, Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Benin, Ethiopia, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Zambia

Year: 2010

Onward with the Cordillera Indigenous Women’s Struggle for Liberation, Democracy, and Self-Determination

Citation:

Castro-Palaganas, Erlinda. 2010. “Onward with the Cordillera Indigenous Women’s Struggle for Liberation, Democracy, and Self-Determination.” Signs 35 (3): 550–58.

Author: Erlinda Castro-Palaganas

Abstract:

To the women of the Cordillera region in the Philippines, the present situation is a lingering source of new problems and challenges. The vast natural wealth of the Cordilleras has been the target of state development aggression. This development thrust is anchored to globalization policies such as privatization, deregulation, and liberalization, and the effects have impoverished, not improved, people’s lives. The corporate mining and logging operations arising from the government’s national mineral liberalization program have not only destroyed the environment but violated indigenous people’s rights. To the indigenous peoples ancestral land is not just a home but their survival. The resulting faces of hunger and poverty, militarization, violence, migration, oppression, and displacement, among many other issues, have profoundly affected women’s well being. But on the other hand, these situations have also pushed women to join other sectors to defend their rights and continue their struggle for self‐determination. The history of indigenous women’s activism in the Cordillera shows decades of militant work with nongovernment organizations, support groups, and advocates. Innabuyog, an alliance of women’s organizations in the Cordillera region, has taken on the struggles of the women of the Cordillera and their enduring resistance and fighting spirit to protect their land, life, and resources. The Cordillera women’s collective struggle for liberation, democracy, and self‐determination is and will be a continuing challenge for as long as women’s rights in the Cordillera are violated.

Topics: Economies, Extractive Industries, Gender, Globalization, Indigenous, Land Grabbing, Political Participation, Rights, Indigenous Rights, Land Rights, Women's Rights Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Philippines

Year: 2010

The Impact of Armed Conflict on Male Youth in Mindanao, Philippines

Citation:

Rajendran, Shobhana, David Veronesi, Nasrudin Mohammad, and Alimudin Mala. 2006. The Impact of Armed Conflict on Male Youth in Mindanao, Philippines. 35.  Washington, DC: Conflict Prevention and Reconstruction, World Bank.

Authors: Shobhana Rajendran, David Veronesi, Nasrudin Mohammad, Alimudin Mala

Abstract:

This study is a companion to an earlier study on Gender and Conflict in Mindanao that was heavily focused on the impact of armed conflict on women (including young women), and stems from a need to understand the situation of young men in the context of the conflict in Mindanao. It also complements a study conducted in early 2005 that examines the impact of the conflict on men, women and youth in five provinces of Mindanao. (SEEP)

Topics: Age, Youth, Armed Conflict, Displacement & Migration, Development, Gender, Men, Boys, Post-Conflict, Post-Conflict Reconstruction, Violence Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Philippines

Year: 2006

The Women's Movement in the Philippines

Citation:

Friesen, Dorothy. 1989. "The Women's Movement in the Philippines." NWSA Journal 1 (4): 676-88.

Author: Dorothy Friesen

Abstract:

Characterizes women's movement in the Philippines. Contributions of the women's movement in the country on international feminism; Historical influences to the country's women's movement; Social conditions of women in the country. (EBSCO)

Topics: Class, Feminisms, Gender, Women, Nationalism, NGOs Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Philippines

Year: 1989

Displaced Women in Settings of Continuing Armed Conflict

Citation:

Roe, Michael D. 1992. “Displaced Women in Settings of Continuing Armed Conflict.” Women & Therapy 13 (1-2): 89–10.

Author: Michael D. Roe

Abstract:

Based on interview data and observations primarily from Central America and the Philippines, this article reviews the psychosocial adaptation of women forced to flee their homes due to armed conflict, but who remain in settings of war violence. The pervasive danger and fear in such settings impedes progress toward psychological and social equilibrium. These women experience terror, a spectrum of war-related emotional traumas, gender and family role instabilities, and sexual vulnerabilities. These women may also experience empowerment in the midst of armed conflict through the formation of new communities in which they share the leadership, through filling essential roles within these communities, and through concretization, in which they both analyze and take action against political and economic oppression and gender subordination.

Keywords: empowerment, female-headed households, gender subordination, migration adaptation

Topics: Armed Conflict, Displacement & Migration, Gender, Women, Gender Roles, Gendered Power Relations, Health, Mental Health, Trauma, Sexual Violence Regions: Americas, Central America, Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Philippines

Year: 1992

Human Rights, the Sex Industry and Foreign Troops: Feminist Analysis of Nationalism in Japan, South Korea and the Philippines

Citation:

Zimelis, Andris. 2009. “Human Rights, the Sex Industry and Foreign Troops: Feminist Analysis of Nationalism in Japan, South Korea and the Philippines.” Cooperation and Conflict 44 (1): 51-71. 

Author: Andris Zimelis

Abstract:

This article explores the relationship between prostitution, nationalism and foreign policies using a feminist analysis framework. Although scholars have dealt with the theoretical role of women in nationalist projects, there is little work factually supporting these theories. There is also a paucity of works demonstrating the role of prostitution in national security policies. This article rectifies these shortcomings and demonstrates that, although prostitution is illegal in Japan, South Korea and the Philippines, these governments have played an active role in supporting and maintaining the prostitution industry geared at servicing US troops. The US troops, in turn, have protected the national security of each of these countries for all of the post-Second World War era. In this context, it seems clear that `national security' does not include the physical, economic, legal and social insecurity of Japanese, Korean and Filipino women despite their contribution to the most quintessential Realist policy — national security.

Topics: Feminisms, Gender, Women, Gender Analysis, Livelihoods, Sexual Livelihoods, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Nationalism, Political Participation, Rights, Human Rights, Security, Trafficking, Sex Trafficking Regions: Asia, East Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Japan, Philippines, South Korea

Year: 2009

Capturing the Huk Amazons: Representing Women Warriors in the Philippines, 1940s-1950s

Citation:

Lanzona, Vina A. 2009. “Capturing the Huk Amazons: Representing Women Warriors in the Philippines, 1940s-1950s.” South East Asia Research 17 (2): 133-74.

Author: Vina A. Lanzona

Abstract:

In the 1940s and 1950s, at the height of the peasant-based Huk rebellion in the Philippines, major newspapers reported the capture of 'Huk Amazons' on an almost daily basis. Leonila was a gun-toting college student captured during military operations against the Huks; Liwayway was a former beauty pageant winner who swore to the authorities that she was 'merely the wife' of a Huk commander. All of these Huk women were indiscriminately labelled as 'Amazons' in the press and in the popular imagination. But what did the term actually mean in the context of the Huk rebellion and, more generally, in Philippine revolutionary history? This paper explores the contested representations of these Filipina women warriors.

Topics: Armed Conflict, Combatants, Female Combatants, Gender, Women Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Philippines

Year: 2009

Class, Gender, and the Contours of Nationalism in the Culture of Philippine Radical Theater

Citation:

Bodden, Michael H. 1996. “Class, Gender, and the Contours of Nationalism in the Culture of Philippine Radical Theater.” Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies 16 (2/3): 24-50. doi:10.2307/3346802.

Author: Michael H. Bodden

Topics: Class, Feminisms, Gender, Women, Nationalism Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Philippines

Year: 1996

‘Same Banana’: Hazing and Honor at the Philippine Military Academy

Citation:

McCoy, Alfred W. 1995. “‘Same Banana’: Hazing and Honor at the Philippine Military Academy.” The Journal of Asian Studies 54 (3): 689-726.

Author: Alfred W. McCoy

Topics: Combatants, Male Combatants, Gender, Men, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Militaries Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Philippines

Year: 1995

Human Rights, the Sex Industry and Foreign Troops: Feminist Analysis of Nationalism in Japan, South Korea and the Philippines

Citation:

Zimelis, Andris. 2009. "Human Rights, the Sex Industry and Foreign Troops: Feminist Analysis of Nationalism in Japan, South Korea and the Philippines." Cooperation and Conflict 44 (1): 51-71.

Author: Andris Zimelis

Abstract:

This article explores the relationship between prostitution, nationalism and foreign policies using a feminist analysis framework. Although scholars have dealt with the theoretical role of women in nationalist projects, there is little work factually supporting these theories. There is also a paucity of works demonstrating the role of prostitution in national security policies. This article rectifies these shortcomings and demonstrates that, although prostitution is illegal in Japan, South Korea and the Philippines, these governments have played an active role in supporting and maintaining the prostitution industry geared at servicing US troops. The US troops, in turn, have protected the national security of each of these countries for all of the post-Second World War era. In this context, it seems clear that 'national security' does not include the physical, economic, legal and social insecurity of Japanese, Korean and Filipino women despite their contribution to the most quintessential Realist policy - national security. 

Keywords: nationalism, national interest, prostitution, human rights, sex industry, US troops, foreign policy

Topics: Feminisms, Gender, Women, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Militaries, Nationalism, Rights, Human Rights, Women's Rights, Security, Trafficking, Sex Trafficking Regions: Asia, East Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Japan, Philippines, South Korea

Year: 2009

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