Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Palestinian Women’s Voices Challenging Human Rights Activism

Citation:

Shalhoub-Kevorkian, Nadera, and Sana Khsheiboun. 2009. “Palestinian Women’s Voices Challenging Human Rights Activism.” Women’s Studies International Forum 32 (5): 354–62. doi:10.1016/j.wsif.2009.07.012.

Authors: Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian, Sana Khsheiboun

Abstract:

A recent study in the Occupied Territories has shown that the most vulnerable groups of society (women, children, and the elderly) are psychologically influenced by the attacks on Palestinian home and land. Psychological and sociological research in Gaza has shown that women suffer the most from psychosomatic problems, while the children and the elderly are subject to depression, severe trauma, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Women's testimonies in the region have demonstrated their capacity to protect themselves, their work, and even their studies despite the dangers involved. These appear to heighten women's defensive mechanisms for facing continuously aggressive acts and practices. Women's stories about homelessness and loss are mainly constructed through their own understanding that the attack on the Palestinian home is part of a larger trend of dominating military forces against the Palestinian ‘Other’. Women have maintained that the destruction of their homes hindered their own progress especially in the domain of protecting family unity, and they have concluded that it is precisely the goal of such policies to destabilize society in this manner. This article uses case studies and interviews with Palestinian women to support a socio-political analysis of this particular situation in the Occupied Territories.

Topics: Armed Conflict, Gender, Women, Health, Mental Health, PTSD, Trauma, Rights, Human Rights Regions: MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Year: 2009

Militarization and Violence Against Women in Conflict Zones in the Middle East: A Palestinian Case-Study

Citation:

Shalhoub-Kevorkian, Nadera. 2009. Militarization and Violence Against Women in Conflict Zones in the Middle East: A Palestinian Case-Study. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Author: Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian

Abstract:

This book examines and discusses the ordeals that women face as violence is perpetrated against them in politically conflicted and militarized areas. In conflict zones, every act is affected by, dependent on and mobilised by militaristic values. The militarization of both the private and public space and the use of the gendered bodies increases the vulnerability of both men and women, and further masculinises the patriarchal hegemonic powers. Through the stories and ordeals of women in politically conflicted areas and war zones, and by sharing voices of Palestinian women from the Occupied Territories, it is shown that claims such as 'security reasoning', fear from 'terrorism', nationalism, preservation of 'cultural authenticity' and preservation of the land can turn women's bodies and lives into boundary markers and thus sites of violence, contestation and resistance.

Annotation:

 

 

 

Topics: Armed Conflict, Gender, Women, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Militarization, Violence Regions: Asia, Middle East Countries: Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Year: 2010

Palestinian Women in the Intifada: Fighting on Two Fronts

Citation:

Kuttab, Eileen. 1993. “Palestinian Women in the Intifada: Fighting on Two Fronts.” Arab Studies Quarterly 15 (2): 1-69.

Author: Eileen Kuttab

Abstract:

"Focuses on the role of Palestinian women in the Intifada, the first Palestinian mass mobilization and culmination of resistance to the Israeli occupation. Historical overview of Palestinian women's participation in the national struggle; Democratization of the women's movement; Comparative perspective between the `old' and `new' women's movement; Platforms and agendas of the women's committees" (EBSCOhost).

Topics: Armed Conflict, National Liberation Wars, Occupation, Gender, Women, Gender Roles, Nationalism Regions: Africa, MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Year: 1993

Daughters of Palestine: Leading Women of the Palestinian National Movement

Citation:

Kawar, Amal. 1996. Daughters of Palestine: Leading Women of the Palestinian National Movement. New York: SUNY Press.

Author: Amal Kawar

Annotation:

SUMMARY

"Based on interviews of the PLO's top women leaders in the Palestinian diaspora and the West Bank and Gaza Strip, Daughters of Palestine provides the first examination of the full history of women's involvement in the Palestinian National Movement from the revolution in the mid-1960s to the Palestinian-Israeli peace process in the early 1990s. Going beyond media imagery, Amal Kawar reviews the women's social and political backgrounds to explain how they overcame the traditional gender roles pervasive in Arab societies and became involved in politics. She then focuses on particular periods in the history of the Palestinian movement, as it moved from Jordan to Lebanon, Tunisia, and the Occupied Territories. Issues covered include women's nationalist activities, their relationship to the male leadership, the impact of crises, and the upsurge of the Islamist movement. A consistent theme of this investigation is how conflicts and crises, inside and outside the Palestinian arena, challenge and frame the success of women's nationalist work. Daughters of Palestine highlights the dilemma of national liberation struggles that both promote and co-opt women's liberation aspirations" (WorldCat). 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

List of Figures

Prologue

Acknowledgments

1. Three Generations of Women Leaders

2. AMMAN Early Years of Revolutionary Struggle

3. BEIRUT National Mobilization and Civil War

4. TUNIS Decline of Mobilization in the Palestinian Diaspora

5. JERUSALEM Women's Committees in the Occupied Territories

Epilogue

Appendix: Interview List

Notes

References

Index

Topics: Armed Conflict, National Liberation Wars, Occupation, Gender, Women, Gender Roles, Gendered Power Relations, Nationalism, Peace Processes Regions: Africa, MENA, North Africa, Asia, Middle East Countries: Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories, Tunisia

Year: 1996

Resistance, Repression, and Gender Politics in Occupied Palestine and Jordan

Citation:

Hasso, Frances Susan. 2005. Resistance, Repression, and Gender Politics in Occupied Palestine and Jordan. New York: Syracuse University Press.

Author: Frances Susan Hasso

Annotation:

Summary:
Useful for students of gender and Middle East studies, this book examines gender, women's involvement, and sexuality in the ideologies and strategies of a transnational Palestinian political movement. It focuses on the central party apparatus of the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine and the Democratic Front branches. (Summary from WorldCat)
 
Table of Contents:
1. Origins of the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine
 
2. The Impact of the State on Mobilization in Jordan and the Occupied Palestinian Territories, 1967-1987
 
3. Civil War in Jordan, 1969-1971
 
4. Divergent Protest Histories in the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine, 1969-1987
 
5. The "Masses" Are Women: The Palestinian Federation of Women's Action Committees in the Occupied Territories, 1978-1987
 
6. Modernity, Morality, and Mobilizing Women in Democratic Front Branches, 1973-1987
 
7. Political Transformations in the Occupied Territories and Jordan
 
8. Ruptures, Betrayals, and New Realities in Democratic Front Branches and the Palestinian Federation of Women's Action Committees

Topics: Armed Conflict, Occupation, Economies, Gender, Women, Gender Roles, Political Participation, Rights, Women's Rights Regions: Africa, MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Jordan, Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Year: 2005

The Women’s Movement, Feminism, and the National Struggle in Palestine: Unresolved Contradictions

Citation:

Glavanis, Kathy. 1992. “The Women’s Movement, Feminism, and the National Struggle in Palestine: Unresolved Contradictions.” Journal of Gender Studies 1 (4): 463–74. doi:10.1080/09589236.1992.9960513.

Author: Kathy Glavanis

Topics: Economies, Feminisms, Gender, Women, Gender Roles, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality Regions: Africa, MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Year: 1992

The Nation and Its “New” Women: The Palestinian Women’s Movement 1920-1948

Citation:

Fleischmann, Ellen. 2003. The Nation and Its “New” Women: The Palestinian Women’s Movement 1920-1948. Berkeley: University of California Press. 

Author: Ellen Fleischmann

Annotation:

Summary:
Though they are almost completely absent from the historical record, Palestinian women were extensively involved in the unfolding national struggle in their country during the British mandate period. Led primarily by urban, educated women from the middle and upper classes of Arab society, Palestinian women struggled against British colonialism and against Jewish settlement by holding a national congress, meeting with government officials, smuggling arms, demonstrating, and participating in regional and international conferences. This book is the first comprehensive historical study of the emergence and development of the Palestinian women's movement in this important historical period. Drawing from little-studied source material including oral histories, newspapers, memoirs, and government documents, Ellen Fleischmann not only shows what these women accomplished within the political arena, but also explores the social, cultural, and economic contexts within which they operated. Charting the emergence of an indigenous feminism in Palestine, this work joins efforts to broaden European and American definitions of feminism by incorporating non-Western perspectives (Summary from University of California Press) 

TABEL OF CONTENTS

Part. 1. Construction of a "new" Palestinian woman

Introduction : inscription into the national narrative

Palestinian women and the rule of the British mandate

The "woman question" in Palestine and the debate in the Arabic press

 

Part. 2. The "new" woman in politics: tThe Palestinian women's movement, 1929-1948

The roots of movement : charity and the nation

Woman is all the nation : the Palestinian women's movement, 1929-1939

The politics of the women's movement : the question of feminism, nationalism, and the "new" woman

Pan-Arabism and the 1940s.

Topics: Armed Conflict, Coloniality/Post-Coloniality, Feminisms, Gender, Gender Roles, Women, Political Participation Regions: Africa, MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Year: 2003

Palestinian Women: Narrative Histories and Gendered Memory

Citation:

Kassem, Fatma. 2011. Palestinian Women: Narrative Histories and Gendered Memory. London & New York: Zed.

Author: Fatma Kassem

Abstract:

Palestinian Women is the first book to examine and document the experiences and the historical narrative of ordinary Palestinian women who witnessed the events of 1948 and became involuntary citizens of the State of Israel. Told in their own words, the women's experiences serve as a window for examining the complex intersections of gender, nationalism and citizenship in a situation of ongoing violent political conflict. Known in Palestinian discourse as the "Nakbeh," or the "Catastrophe," these events of 60 years ago still have a powerful resonance in contemporary Palestinian-Jewish relations in the State of Israel and in the act of narrating these stories, the author argues that the realm of memory is a site of commemoration and resistance.

Topics: Armed Conflict, Gender, Women, Femininity/ies Regions: Africa, MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Israel, Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Year: 2011

Female Suicide Bombers - Male Suicide Bombing? Looking for Gender in Reporting the Suicide Bombings of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Citation:

Brunner, Claudia. 2005. “Female Suicide Bombers – Male Suicide Bombing? Looking for Gender in Reporting the Suicide Bombings of the Israeli–Palestinian Conflict.” Global Society 19 (1): 29–48.

Author: Claudia Brunner

Abstract:

The primary aim of this article is to bring together questions of both the gender representation (notions of femininity and masculinity) and the gender order (existing social relations and power structures) of Palestinian suicide bombing, and thereby to offer a rather unusual perspective on a sensitive topic within what is generally an overanalysed conflict. It is based on the way female suicide bombers have been represented in the media in the first half of 2002, supplemented by publications in 2003 and January 2004. Print and online articles constitute the main basis of interpretation that aims to bring gender as an analytical tool into the continuing debate on suicide bombing. 

Topics: Armed Conflict, Occupation, Combatants, Female Combatants, Gender, Women, Media, Violence, Weapons /Arms Regions: Africa, MENA, Asia, Middle East Countries: Israel, Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories

Year: 2005

Pages

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