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Ghana

Gender and ICTs for Development: A Global Sourcebook

Citation:

Odame, Helen Hambly, Guihuan Li, Minori Terada, Blythe McKay, Mercy Wambui, and Nancy Muturi. 2005. Gender and ICTs for Development: A Global Sourcebook. Amsterdam: KIT (Royal Tropical Institute); Oxfam GB.

Authors: Helen Hambly Odame, Guihuan Li, Minori Terada, Blythe McKay, Mercy Wambui, Nancy Muturi

Abstract:

Around the world information and communication technologies (ICTs) have changed the lives of individuals, organizations and indeed, entire nations. This book is a collection of case studies about women and their communities in developing countries, and how they have been influenced by ICTs. ICTs can have profound implications for women and men in terms of employment, education, health, environmental sustainability and community development.

Women want information and engage in communication that will improve their livelihoods and help them achieve their human rights. This represents a formidable challenge to all societies in today's world, and especially to developing countries. Due to systemic gender biases in ICTs and their applications, women are far more likely than men to experience discrimination in the information society. Women are not giving up on ICTs. On the contrary, even resource-poor and non-literate women and their organizations are aware of the power of information technologies and communication processes and, if given the opportunity to do so, will use them to advance their basic needs and strategic interests.

Five case studies illustrate the different contexts facing gender and ICTs for development, including e-commerce in Bhutan, entrepreneurship by women workers in China, post-war communication using radio and ICTs in Sierra Leone, sustainable fisheries production in Ghana, and information exchange related to HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean. An extensive annotated bibliography of the international literature on Gender and ICTs for development, rural development in particular, and relevant web resources, complement the papers.

Topics: Development, Gender, Women, Infrastructure, Information & Communication Technologies Regions: Africa, West Africa, Americas, Caribbean countries, Asia, East Asia, South Asia Countries: Barbados, Bhutan, China, Ghana, Jamaica, Sierra Leone, Trinidad & Tobago

Year: 2005

Gender, Climate Change and Human Security: Lessons from Bangladesh, Ghana and Senegal

Citation:

Dankelman, Irene, Khurshid Alam, Wahida Bashar Ahmed, Yacine Diagne Gueye, Naureen Fatema, and Rose Mensah-Kutin. 2008. Gender, Climate Change and Human Security: Lessons from Bangladesh, Ghana and Senegal. New York: Women’s Environment and Development Organization.

Authors: Irene Dankelman, Khurshid Alam, Wahida Bashar Ahmed, Yacine Diagne Gueye, Naureen Fatema, Rose Mensah-Kutin

Abstract:

Commissioned by the Greek chairmanship (2007-2008) of the Human Security Network, this study “Gender, Climate Change & Human Security: Lessons from Bangladesh, Ghana and Senegal” explores the interlinkages between gender, climate change and human security. Authors: Irene Dankelman, Khurshid Alam, Wahida Bashar Ahmed, Yacine Diagne Gueye, Naureen Fatema and Rose Mensah-Kutin. (WEDO)

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Women, Security, Human Security Regions: Africa, West Africa, Asia, South Asia Countries: Bangladesh, Ghana, Senegal

Year: 2008

Exploring the Connections: Land Tenure, Social Identities, and Agrobiodiversity Practices in Ghana

Citation:

Awanyo, Louis. 2009. “Exploring the Connections: Land Tenure, Social Identities, and Agrobiodiversity Practices in Ghana.” Geografiska Annaler: Series B, Human Geography 91 (2): 137–55. doi:10.1111/j.1468-0467.2009.00311.x.

Author: Louis Awanyo

Abstract:

This article employs qualitative and quantitative evidence from primary social research in Ghana to examine the link between land tenure security and social identities (of wealth/income and gender), and how they condition farmers’ investments in practices that contribute to the rehabilitation of tree biodiversity (agrobiodiversity). Statistical analyses of the significance of the effects of farmers’ de jure land tenure security regimes, and income and gender on agrobiodiversity practices were inconclusive. The conventional causation link between investments and more secure formal land tenure rights, for instance, was confirmed in investments in four out of eight agrobiodiversity practices. Testimonial-based evidence of farmers provided a clearer concept of land tenure security and an explanatory framework about the interacting and complex effects of income and gender on land tenure security. The theoretical and empirical argument developed from these testimonies portrays land tenure as embodying negotiated social processes, influenced by gender and income of individuals, whereby breadth of land rights, duration of rights over land, and assurance of rights are established, sustained, enhanced or changed through a variety of strategies to shape tenure security. These processes – tenure building and renewal processes – are critical because all farmers have lingering anxiety about land tenure rights, even among farmers with more secure formal rights. Investments are made in agrobiodiversity practices as a strategy to strengthen land tenure security and thereby minimize anxiety, leading to reverse causation effects between land tenure, social identities, and investments.

Keywords: agrobiodiversity, gender, Ghana, income, kinship, land tenure security

Topics: Economies, Gender, Land Tenure, Livelihoods, Political Economies, Rights, Land Rights, Property Rights Regions: Africa, West Africa Countries: Ghana

Year: 2009

Transforming Women's Citizenship Rights Within an Emerging Democratic State: The Case of Ghana

Citation:

Fallon, Kathleen M. 2003. “Transforming Women’s Citizenship Rights within an Emerging Democratic State: The Case of Ghana.” Gender & Society 17 (4): 525–43.

Author: Kathleen M. Fallon

Abstract:

Feminist scholars argue that women generally gain political rights followed by civil and social rights. However, this argument is based on data from North America and Western Europe, and few scholars, if any, have examined the progression of these rights within countries currently undergoing transitions to democracy in different parts of the world. Through in-depth interviews with members of women's organizations in Ghana, the author extends this literature. The findings both contradict and support the prior feminist argument. They indicate that prior to democratization, women focused primarily on social rights to improve their economic well-being. However, new opportunities emerged with the transition, which allowed women to use their political rights to secure more civil and social rights.

Keywords: gender, democracy, Africa, citizenship

Topics: Citizenship, Democracy / Democratization, Gender, Rights, Women's Rights Regions: Africa, West Africa Countries: Ghana

Year: 2003

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