Germany

Trafficking in Human Beings and the 2006 World Cup in Germany

Citation:

Hennig, Jana, Sarah Craggs, Frank Laczko, and Fred Larsson. 2007. Trafficking in Human Beings and the 2006 World Cup in Germany. 29. Geneva: International Organization for Migration.

Authors: Jana Hennig, Sarah Craggs, Frank Laczko, Fred Larsson

Abstract:

The trafficking of women for the purpose of sexual exploitation received considerable attention prior to the 2006 World Cup in Germany. It was widely suggested that this sporting event would contribute to an increase in prostitution and a sharp increase in the number of women trafficked to Germany for sexual exploitation.

This report investigates whether there is any evidence to suggest an increase in the number of women trafficked to Germany for the purpose of sexual exploitation during the 2006 World Cup. It further examines the measures taken by the authorities and non-governmental organizations to counter trafficking in Germany during the event.

Recommendations are provided to help combat the trafficking in persons during similar major events and to provide a tool for future event organizers, policymakers and relevant authorities and NGOS.

Topics: Gender, Women, Governance, Health, International Organizations, NGOs, Sexual Violence, Sexual Exploitation and Abuse, Sexual Slavery, Trafficking, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking Regions: Europe, Central Europe Countries: Germany

Year: 2007

HUMAN TRAFFICKING AROUND THE WORLD: HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT

Citation:

Hepburn, Stephanie, and Rita J. Simon. 2013. HUMAN TRAFFICKING AROUND THE WORLD: HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT. New York: Columbia University Press.

Authors: Stephanie Hepburn, Rita J. Simon

Abstract:

An examination of human trafficking around the world including the following countries: United States, Japan, United Arab Emirates, Thailand, Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories, Colombia, Iraq, Syria, Canada, Italy, France, Iran, India, Niger, China, South Africa, Australia, United Kingdom, Chile, Germany, Poland, Mexico, Russia, and Brazil. (WorldCat)

Annotation:

Table of Contents:

Introduction

Part I: Work Visa Loopholes for Traffickers
1) United States
2) Japan
3) United Arab Emirates

Part II: Stateless Persons
4) Thailand
5) Israel & The Occupied Palestinian Territories

Part III: Unrest, displacement, and Who is in charge
6) Colombia
7) Iraq
8) Syria

Part IV: Conflation
9) Canada

Part V: Conflicting Agendas
10) Italy
11) France

Part VI: Gender Apartheid
12) Iran

Part VII: Social Hierarchy
13) India
14) Niger
15) China

Part VIII: Muti Murder
16) South Africa

Part IX: Hard-to-Prove Criterion and a slap on the wrist
17) Australia
18) United Kingdom
19) Chile
20) Germany

Part X: Transparent borders
21) Poland

Part XI: Fear Factor
22) Mexico

Part XII: Poverty and Economic Boom
23) Russia
24) Brazil

Conclusion

*Each Chapter follows the following format with some variations:

Introduction
As a destination
Internal trafficking
Trafficking abroad
What happens to victims after trafficking
What happens to traffickers
Internal efforts to decrease trafficking

 

Quotes:

"Devestation from a natural disaster...creates a sudden high demand for low-wage and largely unskilled labor. Disruption of the traditional labor supply leaves room for illicit contractors to move in, and new workers can be brought in unnoticed." (19)

"There continue to be more criminal convictions of sex traffickers than of forced-labor traffickers [However, this number of individuals victimized by forced labor may be increasing]." (32)

"Many experts state that the yakuza (organized crime) networks play a significant role in the smuggling and subsequent debt bondage of women--particularly women from China, Thailand, and Colombia--for forced prostitution in Japan. Determining the exact extent of yakuza involvement is difficult because of the covert nature of the sex industry. Consequently, the yakuza are able to minimize people's direct knowledge of their involvement...The yakuza networks work with organized crime groups from other nations, such as China, Russia, and Colombia." (49-50)

Topics: Economies, Gender, Women, Men, Girls, Boys, International Law, International Human Rights, Multi-National Corporations, Rights, Human Rights, Women's Rights, Sexual Violence, Sexual Exploitation and Abuse, Sexual Slavery, Trafficking, Human Trafficking, Labor Trafficking, Sex Trafficking Regions: Africa, West Africa, Americas, Central America, North America, South America, Asia, East Asia, Middle East, Southeast Asia, Europe, Central Europe, Eastern Europe, Western Europe, Oceania Countries: Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, France, Germany, India, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Niger, Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories, Poland, Russian Federation, South Africa, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States of America

Year: 2013

The Forgotten Victims of World War II: Masculinities and Rape in Berlin, 1945

Citation:

Messerschmidt, James W. 2006. “The Forgotten Victims of World War II: Masculinities and Rape in Berlin, 1945.” Violence Against Women 12 (7): 706–12. doi:10.1177/1077801206290691.

Author: James W. Messerschmidt

Topics: Armed Conflict, Gender, Masculinity/ies, Gender-Based Violence, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Sexual Violence, Rape, SV against Women Regions: Europe, Central Europe Countries: Germany

Year: 2006

'Anarchist Amazons’: The Gendering of Radicalism in 1970s West Germany

Citation:

Rosenfeld, Alan. 2010. “‘Anarchist Amazons’: The Gendering of Radicalism in 1970s West Germany.” Contemporary European History 19 (4): 351-74.

Author: Alan Rosenfeld

Abstract:

This article examines the intersection between reactions to urban guerrilla violence and anxieties over the women's liberation movement in 1970s West Germany. State officials and the mainstream press focused a disproportionate amount of attention on women's contributions to left-wing violence, claiming that female guerrillas suffered from an ‘excess of women's liberation.’ However, while commentators juxtaposed domineering women with effeminate men, the actual experiences of women inside groups such as the Red Army Faction often featured expressions of male dominance. Evidence suggests that female guerrillas suffered more from a compulsion to self-sacrifice than excessive emancipation.

Topics: Combatants, Female Combatants, Gender, Women, Gendered Power Relations, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Non-State Armed Groups Regions: Europe, Central Europe Countries: Germany

Year: 2010

Spectre And/or Ideal: Representations of Revolutionary Women in the German Press, 1789–1794

Citation:

Koser, Julie. 2010. “Spectre and/or Ideal: Representations of Revolutionary Women in the German Press, 1789–1794.” German Life and Letters 63 (2): 105-21.

Author: Julie Koser

Abstract:

As a harbinger of the modern political era, the French Revolution altered the social and political landscape of Western Europe. One such alteration was the destabilisation of borders: the geo-political border between French and German territories was under attack as was the gendered boundary between public and private spheres of activity. This instability that threatened to undermine social order in France also endangered the gender norms within German-speaking territories. German newspapers and journals played a decisive role in shaping public opinion about the Revolution by targeting revolutionary women's presence and participation in matters of politics and war. In an attempt to defend and reinforce reactionary political ideologies and social norms against revolutionary fervour that threatened to engulf German regions, the German press mobilised diametrically-opposed representations of female participants in the public sphere: ‘violent’ armed women and ‘well-mannered’ patriotic ladies. The press depicted armed women's presence in the political realm as ‘unnatural’ and ‘dangerous’ while at the same time it privileged images of the patriotic mother and wife whose support of the political cause was depicted as ‘natural’ and ‘non-threatening’. These competing images of revolutionary women, as either spectre or ideal, served as expressions of the hopes and fears Germans felt toward the events unfolding in neighbouring France and border regions of Germany.

Topics: Combatants, Female Combatants, Gender, Women, Political Participation Regions: Europe, Central Europe, Western Europe Countries: France, Germany

Year: 2010

Reparacion Judicial, Principio de Oportunidad e Infancia en la Ley de Justicia & Paz

Citation:

González Medina, Diego Andrés, Jorge Fernando Perdomo Torres, and Cielo Mariño Rojas. 2009. Reparacion Judicial, Principio de Oportunidad e Infancia en la Ley de Justicia & Paz. Bogota: GTZ Embajada de la Republica Federal de Alemania. 

Authors: Diego Andrés González Medina, Jorge Fernando Perdomo Torres, Cielo Mariño Rojas

Topics: Gender, Justice, Reparations, Transitional Justice, Peace Processes Regions: Americas, South America, Europe, Central Europe Countries: Colombia, Germany

Year: 2009

Education under Radical Change: Education Policy and the Youth Program of the United States in Postwar Germany

Citation:

Fuessl, Karl-Heinz, and Gregory Paul Wegner. 1996. “Education under Radical Change: Education Policy and the Youth Program of the United States in Postwar Germany.” History of Education Quarterly 36 (1): 1–18.

Authors: Karl-Heinz Fuessl, Gregory Paul Wegner

Topics: Age, Youth, Education, Gender, Girls, Boys, Gender Roles, Post-Conflict, Post-Conflict Reconstruction Regions: Americas, North America, Europe, Central Europe Countries: Germany, United States of America

Year: 1996

Women’s Movements and Democratic Transition in Chile, Brazil, East Germany, and Poland

Citation:

Baldez, Lisa. 2003. “Women’s Movements and Democratic Transition in Chile, Brazil, East Germany, and Poland.” Comparative Politics 35 (3): 253–72.

Author: Lisa Baldez

Topics: Civil Society, Democracy / Democratization, Feminisms, Gender, Women, Political Participation Regions: Americas, South America, Europe, Central Europe Countries: Brazil, Chile, Germany, Poland

Year: 2003

About Intervening in Vulnerable Societies: Gender in Military Peacekeeping of the Bundeswehr

Citation:

Dittmer, Cordula, and Maja Apelt. 2008. “About Intervening in Vulnerable Societies: Gender in Military Peacekeeping of the Bundeswehr.” In Women in the Military and in Armed Conflict, edited by Helena Carreiras and Gerhard Kümmel, 63–80. Wiesbaden: VS Verlag.

Authors: Cordula Dittmer, Maja Apelt

Topics: Gender, Women, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Militaries, Peacekeeping Regions: Europe, Central Europe Countries: Germany

Year: 2008

Pages

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