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Dominican Republic

Ensuring Women Follow the Money: Gender Barriers in Extractive Industry Revenue Accountability in the Dominican Republic and Zambia

Citation:

Jayasinghe, Namalie, and Maria Ezpeleta. 2019. "Ensuring Women Follow the Money: Gender Barriers in Extractive Industry Revenue Accountability in the Dominican Republic and Zambia." The Extractive Industries and Society, April 15, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.exis.2019.04.003

Authors: Namalie Jasyasinghe, Maria Ezpeleta

Abstract:

Social accountability initiatives (SAIs) can be important to help push for oil, gas, and mining revenues to go to communities impacted by extractive industries (EI). Local investments in targeted services and programs can improve development outcomes and address negative impacts caused by EI. Ensuring that women and women’s rights organizations (WROs) are part of SAIs is likewise crucial, without which investments financed by EI revenues may not reflect the needs and interests of women, missing an opportunity to advance women’s rights and gender equality. This article shares preliminary results from a project that involves: (1) research exploring a women’s rights approach to SAIs on EI revenue transparency; and (2) program activities intended to foster joint agenda-setting between WROs and EI revenue transparency civil society organizations (EITCSOs) that distinctly focus on advancing women’s rights. Initial findings suggest that addressing structural barriers to women’s participation, such as socio-cultural norms, women’s lack of ownership of land and resources, gender-insensitive consultation processes, inaccessibility of information, and women’s lack of awareness of their rights, in SAIs related to EI revenue transparency could improve women’s agency. Through this project, WROs and EITCSOs are building advocacy agendas that respond to these barriers to promote women’s rights.

Keywords: gender, women's rights organizations, social accountability, revenue, extractive industries, Dominican Republic, Zambia, transparency

Topics: Extractive Industries, Gender, Women, Gendered Discourses, International Organizations, Rights, Women's Rights Regions: Africa, East Africa, Americas, Caribbean countries Countries: Dominican Republic, Zambia

Year: 2019

New Plantations, New Workers: Gender and Production Politics in the Dominican Republic

Citation:

Raynolds, Laura T. 2001. “New Plantations, New Workers: Gender and Production Politics in the Dominican Republic.” Gender and Society 15 (1): 7–28.

Author: Laura T. Raynolds

Abstract:

This study analyzes the gendered nature of recent production and labor force restructuring in the Dominican Republic. Using a longitudinal case study of work relations on a large transnational corporate pineapple plantation, the author explores the production politics involved in the initial corporate attempt to create a wage labor force and the subsequent replacement of employees with contracted labor crews. She demonstrates how female, and then male, labor forces were negotiated in this process and how labor relations became embedded in local gendered institutions. The study reveals how workforces and spheres of work are constituted through struggles over gender, as well as ethnicity and class, in intersecting arenas linking the local community to the global economy. In this case, gender proves critical in shaping both worker identity and the shifting scope and form of resistance to plantation practices.

Topics: Class, Economies, Ethnicity, Gender, Gender Roles, Gendered Power Relations, Globalization, Livelihoods, Multi-national Corporations, Political Economies Regions: Americas, Caribbean countries Countries: Dominican Republic

Year: 2001

Mujeres rurales, tierra y producción: Propiedad, acceso y control de la tierra para las mujeres.

Citation:

Fuentes López, Adriana Patricia, Javier Lautaro Medina Bernal and Sergio Andrés Coronado Delgado. 1993. Mujeres rurales, tierra y producción: Propiedad, acceso y control de la tierra para las mujeres. San José, Costa Rica: Asociación para el Desarrollo de las Mujeres Negras Costarricenses.

Authors: Adriana Patricia Fuentes López, Javier Lautaro Medina Bernal , Sergio Andrés Coronado Delgado

Topics: Gender, Women, Men, Girls, Boys, Masculinity/ies, Gender Roles, Femininity/ies, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality, Rights, Land Rights, Property Rights, Women's Rights Regions: Americas, Central America, South America Countries: Dominican Republic, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua

Year: 1993

The Making of a Transnational Community: Migration, Development, and Cultural Change in the Dominican Republic

Citation:

Georges, Eugena. 1990. The Making of a Transnational Community: Migration, Development, and Cultural Change in the Dominican Republic. New York: Columbia University Press.

Author: Eugena Georges

Abstract:

This book is specifically concerned with the less well-studied sending side of the migration continuum and offers a close-range view from the migrants' communities of origin. It is an anthropological study of how US-bound migration from a village in the Dominican Republic, Los Pinos, and from its surrounding countryside, has been initiated, organized, and articulated with larger social and economic processes through time. It is also an ethnographic account of the various consequences of international migration for those who remain in Los Pinos. Issues central to the study include: the essential characteristics of documented and undocumented migrants to the USA and their reasons for migration; the consequences of intensive migration for the local society in general and its economic development in particular; whether international migration has significantly enhanced social mobility and altered local social structure; whether gender relations and women's status changed as a consequence of migration; and the ideological and cultural impact of migration on those still in the community. The structural-historical perspective provides a valuable framework for identifying the political and economic forces that condition migration at the macro level. However, the concrete process of migration becomes intelligible only when adequate attention is also paid to intermediate processes operating on the ground: the organization of households, the composition of networks, and the local formation of classes and class segments. The study assesses migration from Los Pinos in the context of Dominican state policies and the broader constraints of the world system in which the republic is enmeshed. (EBSCO) 

Topics: Class, Displacement & Migration, Migration, Gender, Women, Gendered Power Relations, Households Regions: Americas, Caribbean countries, North America Countries: Dominican Republic, United States of America

Year: 1990

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