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Peace Processes

“Women, Girls, and Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration (DDR)”

Citation:

Cohn, Carol, ed. 2012. “Women, Girls, and Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration (DDR).” Chap. 9 in Women and Wars. Malden, MA: Polity Press. 

Authors: Dyan Mazurana, Linda Eckerbom Cole

Topics: Armed Conflict, DDR, Gender, Women, Girls, Peace Processes

Year: 2012

“Women and Peace Processes”

Citation:

Cohn, Carol, ed. 2012. "Women and Peace Processes.” Chap. 8 in Women and Wars. Malden, MA: Polity Press.  

Authors: Malathi de Alwis, Julie Mertus, Tazreena Sajjad

Topics: Armed Conflict, Gender, International Organizations, Peace Processes, UN Security Council Resolutions on WPS, UNSCR 1325

Year: 2012

No Angry Women at the United Nations: Political Dreams and the Cultural Politics of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325

Citation:

Gibbings, Sheri Lynn. 2011. "No Angry Women at the United Nations: Political Dreams and the Cultural Politics of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325." International Feminist Journal of Politics 13 (4): 522–38. 

Author: Sheri Lynn Gibbings

Abstract:

From the start, United Nations (UN) Security Council Resolution 1325 was celebrated as an achievement for Member States and activists around the world with the promise that gender would be considered in all peace and security-related decisions and planning. This paper describes how two Iraqi women who spoke at an informal meeting at the UN generated embarrassment for some UN-based gender advocates when their performance did not follow the norms expected by the attending NGOs, Member States and UN officials. The reaction to their performance can be explained by two main factors. First, the cultural norms of the UN require issues to be framed in a positive manner. Second, Resolution 1325 is supplemented by discourses that place value on the knowledge produced by women and situate women as peacemakers. When the two Iraqi women denounced the US- and UK-led invasion of Iraq and used terms like ‘imperialism’, they spoke outside of UN-based norms. The subsequent reaction illustrated how agency among gender advocates at the UN is socially and historically contingent.

Keywords: gender, non-governmental organizations, United Nations, UNSCR 1325, speech acts, women, peace and security, discourse and agency

Topics: Gender, Men, Gendered Discourses, Peacekeeping, Peace Processes, UN Security Council Resolutions on WPS, UNSCR 1325

Year: 2011

Anti-Militarism: Political and Gender Dynamics of Peace Movements

Citation:

Cockburn, Cyntha. 2012. Anti-Militarism: Political and Gender Dynamics of Peace Movements. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Author: Cynthia Cockburn

Keywords: peace movements, women and peace, women, militarism, Japan

Annotation:

Contents

Acknowledgements                                                                                           x

Glossary of Acronyms                                                                                        xi

Introduction 1

  1. Finding a Voice: Women at Three Moments of British Peace Activism             19
  2. War Resisters and Pacifist Revolution                                                             46
  3. Legitimate Disobedience: An Anti-militarist Movement in Spain                     74                    
  4. Midlands City: Faiths and Philosophies Together for Palestine                        103
  5. Saying No to NATO: Divergent Strategies                                                       126                                        
  6. Seeing the Whole Picture: Anti-militarism in Okinawa and Japan                    152
  7. A State of Peace: Movements to Reunify and Demilitarize Korea                     180
  8. Guns and Bodies: Armed Conflict and Domestic Violence                                211
  9. Towards a Different Common Sense                                                                231

 

References                                                                                                            264

Index                                                                                                                    277

 

 

 

Topics: Gender, Women, Men, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Militarism, Peacebuilding, Peace Processes Regions: MENA, Asia, East Asia, Middle East, Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe Countries: Japan, Palestine / Occupied Palestinian Territories, South Korea, Spain, United Kingdom

Year: 2012

Peace Agreements as a Means for Promoting Gender Equality and Ensuring Participation for Women

Citation:

Chinkin, Christine. 2003. ‘Peace Agreements as a Means for Promoting Gender Equality and Ensuring Participation for Women’. United Nations Division for the Advancement of Women. http://www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/egm/peace2003/reports/BPChinkin.PDF.

Author: Christine Chinkin

Abstract:

This background paper raises some issues with respect to the objectives of the meeting to: Identify good practices and lessons learned for inclusion of gender perspectives in peace agreements and the processes preceding such agreements; and Establish standards to be met in peace agreements with regard to incorporation of gender perspectives. 

 

Keywords: gender, political participation, gender equality, peace agreements

Topics: Gender, Women, Peacebuilding, Peace Processes, Political Participation

Year: 2003

Women’s Political Participation and Economic Empowerment in Post-Conflict Countries

Citation:

Sow, Ndeye. 2012. ‘Women’s Political Participation and Economic Empowerment in Post-Conflict Countries: Lessons from the Great Lakes Region in Africa’. London: International Alert. http://www.international-alert.org/resources/publications/womens-political-participation-and-economic-empowerment-post-conflict.

Author: Ndeye Sow

Topics: Gender, Women, Masculinity/ies, Gender Analysis, Gender Budgeting, Gender Mainstreaming, Governance, Constitutions, Quotas, Elections, Post-conflict Governance, Peace Processes, Political Economies, Political Participation, Post-Conflict Regions: Africa, Central Africa, East Africa Countries: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Uganda

Year: 2012

Mujeres e Insurrección en Colombia: Reconfiguración de la Identidad Femenina en la Guerrilla

Citation:

Ibarra Melo, María Eugenia. 2009. “Mujeres e Insurrección en Colombia: Reconfiguración de la Identidad Femenina en la Guerrilla.” Santiago de Cali, Colombia: Pontificia Universidad Javeriana.

Author: María Eugenia Ibarra Melo

Annotation:

Contenido:

Capítulo I: Identidad de género y participación política en conflictos armados

1. El concepto de identidad

2. La guerra y la violencia desde su perspectiva de género

3. Las mujeres en el ciclo de paz y guerra: un análisis desde la perspectiva de género

4. La lucha armada como opción política

Capítulo II: La experiencia de las mujeres en las guerrillas colombianas

1. El contexto sociopolítico de la incorporación

2. La participación de las mujeres en los “proyectos revolucionarios”

3. Cuando ellas deciden la opción armada: tipología de la vinculación de mujeres a las guerrillas

Capítulo III: Las vicisitudes de la militancia femenina en la guerrilla

1. La entrada en escena de las mujeres en el movimiento insurgente

2. La exclusión de las mujeres en los niveles superiores de la estructura jerárquica

3. El proceso de identificación personal y colectiva en la guerra

4. El balance de la militancia

Topics: Armed Conflict, Civil Wars, Civil Society, Combatants, Female Combatants, Male Combatants, Gender, Women, Men, Girls, Boys, Masculinity/ies, Gender Roles, Gender Analysis, Femininity/ies, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Hierarchies, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Non-state armed groups, Peacebuilding, Peace Processes, Political Participation, Violence Regions: Americas, Central America, South America Countries: Colombia

Year: 2009

Gender and consociational power-sharing in Northern Ireland

Citation:

Hayes, Bernadette C. and Ian McAllister. 2012. “Gender and consociational power-sharing in Northern Ireland.” International Political Science Review 34 (2): 123-139.

Authors: Bernadette C. Hayes, Ian McAllister

Abstract:

Designing political arrangements is the most viable approach to resolving inter-communal divisions in post-conflict societies. Yet women are frequently ill-served by such peace settlements, since gender equality is often sacrificed in an effort to resolve conflicts over national identity. Northern Ireland is no exception to this trend. Although the 1998 Northern Ireland Agreement made specific provision for gender equality, it was primarily framed in terms of national identity. This article examines to what extent this focus on inter-communal ethnic division undermined support for the Agreement among women. Using data from the 2010 Northern Ireland Election Survey, we examine gender differences in attitudes towards the consociational institutions of government. The results show a significant gender gap in support for the institutional arrangements that were established by the Agreement. We propose and test three explanations to account for this gender gap. 

Keywords: post-conflict, consociationalism, gender, national identity, power-sharing

Topics: Armed Conflict, Civil Wars, Ethnic/Communal Wars, Civil Society, Democracy / Democratization, Domestic Violence, Economies, Poverty, Ethnicity, Gender, Women, Men, Girls, Boys, Governance, Constitutions, Elections, Post-conflict Governance, Justice, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Paramilitaries, Nationalism, Peacebuilding, Peace Processes, Political Participation, Post-Conflict, Rights, Human Rights, Women's Rights, Weapons /Arms Regions: Europe, Western Europe Countries: Ireland

Year: 2012

Gender, conflict and peace-building: Lessons from the conflict in the former Yugoslavia

Citation:

Korac, Maja. 2006. “Gender, conflict and peace-building: Lessons from the conflict in the former Yugoslavia.” Women's Studies International Forum 29: 510-20.

Author: Maja Korac

Abstract:

This article explores the importance of gender sensitive analysis of conflict constructed as ethnic strife for conceptualising and developing new and more effective ways of intervening in this type of war. It points out that because most of the physical violence and suffering in these conflicts occur at the community level, they generate massive refugee movements, causing not only physical and material devastation, but also the destruction of social networks and local communities. This critically affects the prospects for refugee return, which is central to any sustainable peace agreement and post-conflict democratic development. In searching for an answer to the question of how to address effectively the issue of reconciliation in such a context, the discussion highlights the centrality of acknowledging gender dimensions and dynamics of this type of war, as a way of uncovering and recognising a reconciliatory potential of women as women organising and activism that often occurs in these conflicts. By focusing specifically on the initiatives of some women's groups during the war in the former Yugoslavia, which aimed at rebuilding trust and broken social networks at a communal level, the article examines the reasons why women as women often opt for alternative forms of political mobilisation. It argues that this type of activism has an important potential for conflict resolution and should be recognised in a fundamental way in any attempt to build peace in conflict zones.

Topics: Armed Conflict, Ethnic/Communal Wars, Democracy / Democratization, Displacement & Migration, Refugees, Gender, Women, Gender Analysis, Governance, Post-conflict Governance, Peacebuilding, Peace Processes, Political Participation, Post-Conflict, Violence Regions: Europe, Balkans Countries: Yugoslavia (former)

Year: 2006

Pages

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