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Patriarchy

Snagged on the Contradiction: NATO UNSC Resolution 1325, and Feminist Responses

Citation:

Cockburn, Cynthia. 2011. ‘Snagged on the Contradiction: NATO UNSC Resolution 1325, and Feminist Responses’. Unpublished mansuscript. http://www.cynthiacockburn.org/BlogNATO1325.pdf.

Author: Cynthia Cockburn

Abstract:

Feminist antimilitarists in a host of countries and contexts are struggling with the contradictions inherent in UN Security Council Resolution 1325 of 31 October 2000 on Women, Peace and Security. It was ‘our’ achievement. It was ‘our’ project and ‘our’ success. Yet the more energetically we push for its implementation, the more we see its limitations. Worse, we realize how it can be used for ends quite contrary to those we intended. In this respect, NATO is a thought-provoking case. No…. more than that, it’s an enraging example of how good feminist work can be manipulated by a patriarchal and militarist institution. 

Keywords: UNSCR 1325, NATO, militarism, antimilitarism, patriarchy

Topics: Feminisms, Gender, Women, Masculinity/ies, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, International Organizations, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Militarism, UN Security Council Resolutions on WPS, UNSCR 1325 Countries: Afghanistan

Year: 2011

Domestic violence prevention through the Constructing Violence-free Masculinities programme: an experience from Peru

Citation:

Mitchell, Rhoda. 2013. “Domestic violence prevention through the Constructing Violence-free Masculinities programme: an experience from Peru.” Gender and Development, 21 (1): 97-109.

Author: Rhoda Mitchell

Abstract:

This paper examines work undertaken with male perpetrators of violence in the Construction of Violence-free Masculinities, a project run by the Centro Mujer Teresa de Jesus, a Women’s Centre located in a poor peri-urban district of Lima, Peru, in conjunction with Oxfam-Quebec. Centre staff faced the challenge of how to work with men who are violent towards their intimate partners. They use a community education approach, to challenge powerful stereotypes about gender roles, to question men’s assumed dominance over women, and support men to construct new forms of masculinity, without violence. Ultimately, the programme seeks to modify and change the beliefs, values, attitudes, and behaviours of men who are aggressors.

Keywords: masculinity, Intimate partner violence, domestic violence, men's groups

Topics: Armed Conflict, Civil Wars, Ethnic/Communal Wars, Domestic Violence, Education, Gender, Women, Men, Girls, Boys, Masculinity/ies, Gender Roles, Gender Analysis, Gender Balance, Gender-Based Violence, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Gender Hierarchies, Gender Equality/Inequality, Gender Equity, Masculinism, Households, NGOs, Nonviolence, Sexual Violence, Male Perpetrators, Rape, SV against women, Sexuality, Violence Regions: Americas, Central America, South America Countries: Peru

Year: 2013

Positioning Women within the Environmental Justice Framework: A Case from the Mining Sector

Citation:

Bose, Sharmistha. 2004. “Positioning Women within the Environmental Justice Framework: A Case from the Mining Sector.” Gender, Technology and Development 8 (3): 407–12.

Author: Sharmistha Bose

Topics: Environment, Extractive Industries, Gender, Gender Roles, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Gender Equality/Inequality, Gender Equity, Livelihoods Regions: Asia, South Asia Countries: India

Year: 2004

Mining Coal and Undermining Gender: Rhythms of Work and Family in the American West

Citation:

Rolston, Jessica Smith. 2014. Mining Coal and Undermining Gender: Rhythms of Work and Family in the American West. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

Author: Jessica Smith Rolston

Topics: Extractive Industries, Gender, Masculinity/ies, Gender Roles, Femininity/ies, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Gender Equality/Inequality Regions: Americas, North America Countries: United States of America

Year: 2014

Extractive Industries and Women in Southern Africa

Citation:

Moyo, Theresa. 2011. “Extractive Industries and Women in Southern Africa.” BUWA! A Journal on African Women's Experiences. Open Society Initiative for Southern Africa. Accessed July 29, 2015. http://www.osisa.org/buwa/regional/women-and-extractive-industries-southern-africa.

Author: Theresa Moyo

Annotation:

“The main objectives of this article are to assess the participation of women in mining in southern Africa and to assess the underlying factors which limit participation. It also examines the impact of mining activities on women. Finally, the paper explores strategies to improve women’s participation in ability and to benefit from, the sector, and to reduce the negative impact on their lives.

The paper raises a number of questions. What role are women playing in the sector? What factors have determined their participation or non-participation? What is the impact of mining activities on the lives of women? What policies and strategies are required in order to promote greater and more meaningful participation of women?” (Moyo, 2015, p. 61)

Topics: Development, Economies, Economic Inequality, Extractive Industries, Gender, Women, Gender Roles, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Gender Equality/Inequality, Gender Equity, Health, Livelihoods Regions: Africa, Southern Africa

Year: 2011

Patriarchal Confusion? Making Sense of Gay and Lesbian Military Identity

Citation:

Bulmer, Sarah. 2013. "Patriarchal Confusion? Making Sense of Gay and Lesbian Military Identity." International Feminist Journal of Politics 15 (2): 137-156. doi:10.1080/14616742.2012.746565.

Author: Sarah Bulmer

Abstract:

In this article I investigate the possible uses of Cynthia Enloe's idea of ‘patriarchal confusion’ in understanding gay and lesbian military identity. Through an analysis of military discourses surrounding the inclusion of gays and lesbians in the British military since 2000, and using original interview data with serving personnel, I examine the contradictory ways in which queer identity has been incorporated within a military dominated by heteronormative masculinity. By examining conflicting attitudes towards gay and lesbian soldiers' participation in Pride marches, I show how patriarchal understandings of military identity become ‘confused’ by both heterosexual and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender personnel. I argue for a move away from viewing the integration of non-traditional recruits through the dichotomous lens of subversion or co-option, and instead call for an engagement with the ambiguities and confusions that arise from that integration. Reading this confusion through Butler's concept of performativity, I demonstrate how even confused ideas about gender can reproduce patriarchy, and why patriarchy often simultaneously fails to reproduce itself. A performative reading of ‘patriarchal confusion’ therefore indicates the radically contingent character of the reproduction of patriarchal norms in the military and suggests that sites of confusion might be fertile grounds for feminist interventions.

Keywords: military, homosexuality, LGBT, military masculinities, patriarchy

Topics: Gender, Masculinity/ies, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, LGBTQ, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Militaries, Sexuality

Year: 2013

Toward an Understanding of Gendered Agency in Contemporary Russia

Citation:

Holmgren, Beth. 2013. “Toward an Understanding of Gendered Agency in Contemporary Russia.” Signs 38 (3): 535-542. 

Author: Beth Holmgren

Abstract:

Assessments of Russian women’s current social and political status must take into account the complicated legacy of Soviet women’s “emancipation.” Although the Soviet government enforced women’s access to higher education and a broad array of professional opportunities, it never challenged traditional notions of masculinity and femininity, or the double burden tacitly assigned women. It did not invest in products and services that would have eased “women’s work” as homemakers and caretakers, nor did it protect women from sexual harassment on the job. The transition years have bared, glorified, and globalized the patriarchal state that lay just beneath the socialist veneer of the Soviet Union. Indeed, the Putin government has repackaged that patriarchy as conventionally and commercially masculinist. Women do exercise some power as consumers and mothers; they seek other-than-material fulfillment in facilitating positions rather than face opprobrium as public leaders. Some are attempting to scout new forms of agency as managers and business entrepreneurs. Yet there is no straightforward upward ladder for women in work and no generally acceptable movement toward lobbying for women’s rights. The women who wield the greatest sociopolitical influence in Russia today are media pundits, writers of serious literature, and journalists who combine writing with general social and political activism. In order to bridge the great divide in historical conditioning and contemporary circumstance that separates us from Russian women, we must work toward a better understanding of their complex forms of agency.

Topics: Citizenship, Gender, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Gender Equality/Inequality, Masculinism, Governance, Livelihoods, Political Participation Regions: Asia, Europe Countries: Russian Federation

Year: 2013

Models for Masculinity in Colonial and Postcolonial Papua New Guinea

Citation:

Fife, Wayne. 1995. “Models for Masculinity in Colonial and Postcolonial Papua New Guinea.” The Contemporary Pacific 7 (2): 277-302. 

Author: Wayne Fife

Abstract:

This paper discusses the kinds of models that became available in the colonial context for indigenous men to be men in what eventually became the country of Papua New Guinea. One of the legacies of colonialism and the missionization of masculinity is the development of a new hierarchy of masculine values. These newer norms are in marked contrast to older forms of male effectiveness, and they have helped to define social distinctions within contemporary Papua New Guinea. At the same time, the reality of human behavior spills over the confines of both older and newer cultural norms, and the results can be confusing for individual males. However, individual confusion does not affect the overall saliency of these historically engendered forms of masculinity, nor the importance they may have for the justification of emerging social and economic inequalities within the country.

Topics: Coloniality/Post-Coloniality, Economies, Economic Inequality, Gender, Men, Masculinity/ies, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Gender Equality/Inequality Regions: Oceania Countries: Papua New Guinea

Year: 1995

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