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Gender

Sovereignty, Vulnerability, and a Gendered Resistance in Indian-Occupied Kashmir

Citation:

Osuri, Goldie. 2018. “Sovereignty, Vulnerability, and a Gendered Resistance in Indian-Occupied Kashmir.” Third World Thematics: A TWQ Journal 3 (2): 228–43.

Author: Goldie Osuri

Abstract:

Drawing on Iffat Fatima’s documentary film, Khoon Diy Baarav or Blood Leaves its Trail (2015), this paper explores how a gendered Kashmiri activism against human rights violations allows for reenvisioning the concept of an authoritarian and violent Westphalian sovereignty concerned with exclusive political authority and territory. Previous studies of gendered resistance are examined as are reformulations of sovereignty through feminist and Indigenous critiques. Through these examinations, the paper offers a way to rethink sovereignty through the theoretical concept of vulnerability. Such a rethinking of sovereignty may point to an interrelational model of sovereignty where the vulnerability of gendered bodies and the environment may be emphasised. In the context of human rights violations in Kashmir, this reenvisioning of sovereignty may be a necessary counter to the repetitious cycles of necropolitical sovereign power.

Keywords: Gender and sovereignty, Kashmir, human rights, vulnerability, resistance and activism

Topics: Armed Conflict, Occupation, Environment, Feminisms, Gender, Governance, Rights, Human Rights Regions: Asia, South Asia Countries: India, Pakistan

Year: 2018

Nature, Self, and Gender: Feminism, Environmental Philosophy, and the Critique of Rationalism

Citation:

Plumwood, Val. 1991. “Nature, Self, and Gender: Feminism, Environmental Philosophy, and the Critique of Rationalism.” Hypatia 6 (1): 3–27.

Author: Val Plumwood

Abstract:

Rationalism is the key to the connected oppressions of women and nature in the West. Deep ecology has failed to provide an adequate historical perspective or an adequate challenge to human/nature dualism. A relational account of self enables us to reject an instrumental view of nature and develop an alternative based on respect without denying that nature is distinct from the self. This shift of focus links feminist, environmentalist, and certain forms of socialist critiques. The critique of anthropocentrism is not sacrificed, as deep ecologists argue, but enriched.

Topics: Environment, Feminisms, Gender, Women

Year: 1991

Mapping a Research Agenda Concerning Gender and Climate Change: A Review of the Literature

Citation:

Moosa, Christina Shaheen, and Nancy Tuana. 2014. “Mapping a Research Agenda Concerning Gender and Climate Change: A Review of the Literature.” Hypatia 29 (3): 677–94.

Authors: Christina Shaheen Moosa, Nancy Tuana

Annotation:

Summary: 
"The collection of papers in this special issue marks the first attempt to bring together feminist philosophical work on the topic of climate change. In this literature review we seek to situate and enlarge upon this work by putting it in conversation with relevant work in climate ethics, in particular, and in feminist philosophy in general. Our goal is to catalyze a robust feminist philosophical research agenda on the pressing and uniquely complex practical problems posed by climate change" (Moosa and Tuana 2014, 677). 
 

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Feminisms, Gender

Year: 2014

Excuse Us, While We Fix the Sky: WEIRD Supermen and Climate Engineering

Citation:

Fleming, Jim. 2017. “Excuse Us, While We Fix the Sky: WEIRD Supermen and Climate Engineering.” RCC Perspectives: Transformations in Environment and Society 4: 23–8.

Author: Jim Fleming

Abstract:

In this paper, Jim Fleming looks at the current state of climate engineering, which, he argues, is in need of critical evaluation given its gendered aspects. Informed by feminist readings, Fleming first presents an overview of the masculinist rhetoric and domination of nature as rooted in Baconian scientific ideals. He continues with a brief sketch of the current state of climate engineering proposals (focusing on solar radiation management), which are dominated by Western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic (WEIRD) men. Fleming concludes that both environmental humanities and social science scholars need to be included in a critical evaluation of the masculinist nature of climate intervention.

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Feminisms, Gender, Masculinity/ies

Year: 2017

Death by Degrees: Taking a Feminist Hard Look at the 2º Climate Policy

Citation:

Seager, Joni. 2009. “Death by Degrees: Taking a Feminist Hard Look at the 2Climate Policy.” Kvinder, Køn & Forskning 3/4: 11–21.

Author: Joni Seager

Abstract:

International policy-makers are forging a consensus that a 2°C rise in global temperature represents an acceptable and manageable level of danger to the planet. This is not a conclusion supported by climate science. Feminist analysis helps to reveal the gendered political and ideological underpinnings of this approach to climate change.

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Femininity/ies

Year: 2009

Caring about Nature: Feminist Ethics and the Environment

Citation:

King, Roger J.H. 1991. “Caring about Nature: Feminist Ethics and the Environment.” Hypatia 6 (1): 75–89.

Author: Roger J.H. King

Abstract:

In this essay I examine the relevance of the vocabulary of an ethics of care to ecofeminism. While this vocabulary appears to offer a promising alternative to moral extensionism and deep ecology, there are problems with the use of this vocabulary by both essentialists and conceptualists. I argue that too great a reliance is placed on personal lived experience as a basis for ecofeminist ethics and that the concept of care is insufficiently determinate to explicate the meaning of care for nature.

Topics: Environment, Feminisms, Gender

Year: 1991

Gendering Climate Change through the Transport Sector

Citation:

Polk, Merritt. 2009. “Gendering Climate Change through the Transport Sector.” Kvinder, Køn & Forskning 3/4: 73–8.

Author: Merritt Polk

Annotation:

Summary: 
"The most pressing global environmental problem today is climate change. A variety of prominent reports all point to the seriousness and potential catastrophic consequences that will result unless radical changes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions are realized (IPCC 2007; Stern 2006). Despite the visibility of such debates, there is doubt regarding the willingness and ability of present generations to change their current behavior quickly enough to reduce the scope of future catastrophes. Greenhouse gas emissions from the transport sector are a prime example where, both commercial and pri- vate use of fossil fuels are increasing at alarming rates despite international consensus regarding the need for massive reductions. One of the major points of contention stems from global inequalities regarding carbon dioxide emissions. Countries with low per capita levels of fossil fuel use do not see themselves as responsible for climate change and demand the right to continue their carbon based economic development. Highly motorized countries show little success or interest in reducing their greenhouse gas emissions to the extent and in the time frame that may be required. Overall, a radical and immediate reduction of carbon dioxide from the transport sector is not seen as feasible in highly motorized countries, or fair to less motorized ones" (Polk 2009, 73-4). 

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Infrastructure, Transportation

Year: 2009

Gendered Environmental Security in IDP and Refugee Camps

Citation:

Rosenow-Williams, Kerstin, and Katharina Behmer. 2015. “Gendered Environmental Security in IDP and Refugee Camps.” Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice 27: 188–95.

Authors: Kerstin Rosenow-Williams, Katharina Behmer

Annotation:

Summary:
"The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and its Executive Committee have long stressed that situations of flight and displacement affect men and women differently and that effective programming must recognize these differences. In the mid-1980s UNHCR, and various other humanitarian actors, began incorporating a gender perspective into their humanitarian activities. Since then a large variety of handbooks, guidelines, and toolkits have been developed. The 2008 UNHCR Handbook for the Protection of Women and Girls, for example, notes that gender mainstreaming has been adopted as a United Nations (UN)–wide policy, recognizing that centralizing the differing needs of women and men into the design of programs, policies, and operations is necessary to fundamentally improve the position of gender equality.
 
"To monitor and advance this policy approach, this essay advocates the use of a gendered human security perspective as an analytical tool to disentangle the gendered dimensions of security for individuals and groups during displacement. It places a special focus on the interrelation between gender categories, their social construction, and the intersectionality of individual characteristics. An intersectional focus on gender-specific dimensions of displacement means taking into account other factors that can cause vulnerability and insecurities (such as age, sexuality, race, religion, class, and ethnicity), thus, also acknowledging the different security situations of individuals within the same gender group. Fusing the concepts of gender mainstreaming and human security proves to be a useful approach to conceptualize and address the multilayered and interrelated security needs of men, women, boys, and girls while providing evidence of the importance of making both sexes the key referents for human security" (Rosenow-Williams and Behmer 2015, 188). 

Topics: Age, Clan, Displacement & Migration, Migration, Refugees, Ethnicity, Gender, Gender Mainstreaming, International Organizations, Race, Religion, Security, Human Security, Sexuality

Year: 2015

Gendered Discourse About Climate Change Policies

Citation:

Swim, Janet K., Theresa K. Vescio, Julia L. Dahl, and Stephanie J. Zawadzki. 2018. “Gendered Discourse About Climate Change Policies.” Global Environmental Change 48: 216–25.

Authors: Janet K. Swim, Theresa K. Vescio, Julia L. Dahl, Stephanie J. Zawadzki

Abstract:

Extending theory and research on gender roles and masculinity, this work predicts and finds that common ways of talking about climate change are gendered. Climate change policy arguments that focus on science and business are attributed to men more than to women. By contrast, policy arguments that focus on ethics and environmental justice are attributed to women more than men (Study 1). Men show gender matching tendencies, being more likely to select (Study 2) and positively evaluate (Study 3) arguments related to science and business than ethics and environmental justice. Men also tend to attribute negative feminine traits to other men who use ethics and environmental justice arguments, which mediates the relation between type of argument and men’s evaluation of the argument (Study 3). The gendered nature of public discourse about climate change and the need to represent ethical and environmental justice topics in this discourse are discussed.

Keywords: gender, climate change, political discourse, masculinity, environmental justice

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Masculinity/ies, Gender Roles, Gendered Discourses, Justice

Year: 2018

NGOs and Post-Conflict Recovery: The Leitana Nehan Women's Development Agency, Bougainville

Citation:

Hakena, Helen, Peter Ninnes, and Bert Jenkins, eds. 2006. NGOs and Post-Conflict Recovery: The Leitana Nehan Women’s Development Agency, Bougainville. Canberra: ANU E Press and Asia Pacific Press.

Authors: Helen Hakena, Bert A. Jenkins, Peter Ninnes

Annotation:

Summary:
When government services have broken down or when international nongovernment organisations are uninterested or unable to help, grassroots non-government organisations provide important humanitarian, educational and advocacy services. Yet, too often the story of the crucial role played by these organisations in conflict and post-conflict recovery goes unheard. The Leitana Nehan Women's Development Agency provides many salutary lessons for grassroots non-government organisations undertaking peacemaking and peace-building work. In the thirteen years of its existence, it has contributed humanitarian assistance, provided education programs on peace, gender issues and community development, and has become a powerful advocate for women's and children's rights at all levels of society. Its work has been recognised through the award of a United Nations' Millennium Peace Price in 2000 and a Pacific Peace Prize in 2004. This book makes a unique contribution to understanding the role of nongovernment organisations in promoting peace and development and gender issues in the South West Pacific. (Summary from ANU Press)

Topics: Armed Conflict, Ethnic/Communal Wars, Secessionist Wars, Development, Gender, Women, conflict, Humanitarian Assistance, NGOs, Peacebuilding, Post-Conflict, Rights, Women's Rights Regions: Oceania Countries: Papua New Guinea

Year: 2006

Pages

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