Printer-friendly version Send by email PDF version

Climate Change

Women, Environment, and Sustainable Development

Citation:

Pandey, Shanta. 1998. “Women, Environment, and Sustainable Development.” International Social Work 41 (3): 339-55. 

Author: Shanta Pandey

Annotation:

Summary:
“In developing countries, poor populations, especially women and children, are disproportionately concentrated in ecologically degraded, fragile, and marginal lands (Durning, 1989). A wide range of development programs have been launched to promote social and economic development of rural areas. These programs are in the form of reforestation, irrigation and drinking water improvement, innovative farming techniques, primary health care facilities and health education, and training and human capital development. People’s participation, especially women’s, in these development programs is crucial for their success. Much has been written on the failure of states and development projects to engage rural people, especially rural women, in these rural development initiatives (Mayoux, 1995). This paper reviews several case studies conducted in Nepal and identifies some of the factors that contribute to the participation of rural people, especially rural women, in forest resources management programs. The paper also discusses social workers’ role in promoting participation and sustainable development” (Pandey, 1998, 339).

Topics: Civil Society, Development, Economies, Economic Inequality, Poverty, Environment, Climate Change, Environmental Disasters, Gender, Women, Humanitarian Assistance, Infrastructure, Energy, Transportation, Water & Sanitation Regions: Asia, South Asia Countries: Nepal

Year: 1998

The Role of Gender and Caste in Climate Adaptation Strategies in Nepal

Citation:

Onta, Nisha, and Bernadette P. Resurreccion. 2011. “The Role of Gender and Caste in Climate Adaptation Strategies in Nepal.” Mountain Research and Development 31 (4): 351–56.

Authors: Nisha Onta, Bernadette P. Resurreccion

Abstract:

Despite the growing number of studies and research projects on climate change adaptation, only a few have examined the gender and cultural dynamics of the adaptation process. Inequality has been identified as a major indicator of the vulnerability of individuals and groups; nevertheless, the gender and cultural aspects of inequality have not received much emphasis. The present article attempts to analyze the influence of gender and cultural relations on the process of climate change adaptation by presenting a study of Dalit and Lama households in the mountainous Humla District of Nepal. The inhabitants of Humla have been experiencing a shift in the monsoon season, a decrease in snowfall, and longer dry periods, with adverse effects on their livelihoods. The main focus of this article is to highlight the cultural, social, and economic dependency of the Lama and Dalit ethnic groups and to examine whether processes of adaptation exacerbate or alter gender inequalities and intercaste dependencies. (Abstract from original source)

Keywords: climate change, adaptation, gender, caste, Dalit, Humla, Nepal

Annotation:

Topics: Caste, Environment, Climate Change, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Hierarchies, Gender Equality/Inequality Regions: Asia, South Asia Countries: Nepal

Year: 2011

The Effects of Gender on Climate Change Knowledge and Concern in the American Public

Citation:

McCright, Aaron M. 2010. “The Effects of Gender on Climate Change Knowledge and Concern in the American Public.” Population and Environment 32 (1): 66–87.

Author: Aaron M. McCright

Abstract:

This study tests theoretical arguments about gender differences in scientific knowledge and environmental concern using 8 years of Gallup data on climate change knowledge and concern in the US general public. Contrary to expectations from scientific literacy research, women convey greater assessed scientific knowledge of climate change than do men. Consistent with much existing sociology of science research, women underestimate their climate change knowledge more than do men. Also, women express slightly greater concern about climate change than do men, and this gender divide is not accounted for by differences in key values and beliefs or in the social roles that men and women differentially perform in society. Modest yet enduring gender differences on climate change knowledge and concern within the US general public suggest several avenues for future research, which are explored in the conclusion. (Abstract from original source)

Keywords: gender, climate change, Knowledge, Concern

Annotation:

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Gender Analysis Regions: Americas, North America Countries: United States of America

Year: 2010

Women and Floods in Bangladesh

Citation:

Khondker, Habibul Haque. 1996. “Women and Floods in Bangladesh.” International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters 14 (3): 281-92.

Author: Habibul Haque Khondker

Annotation:

Summary:
This paper examines the consequences of a flood disaster on rural women in northern Bangladesh. Based on fieldwork, it is argued that floods affect rural women more adversely than rural men. Floods destroy the household resources undermining the economic well-being of rural women. Researchers and authorities in charge of rehabilitation have not paid enough attention to the uneven impact of flood disasters on gender groups. Women are rarely involved in the decision-making process regarding disaster response. The lack of participation of women in particular and the local community in general in the planning and execution of counterdisaster plans insure that such issues are not noticed. Bureaucratic disaster respondents to be short term in its scope and fails to link disaster response and rehabilitation with development activities. Various nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) operating in rural Bangladesh seem to have closer ties with the local community and a better understanding of the linkage between rehabilitation and development. However, because of the limited scope of their operations and constraints of resources, the influence of these NGOs are not sustainable. The rural women cope on their own. The status quo time is achieved, a continuation of impoverished existence which makes them vulnerable to the next flooding or other such disasters. Successful counterdisaster-response and rehabilitation strategies to development initiatives. This would entail participation of women in counterdisaster plans and assuring the economic well-being of rural women.

Topics: Displacement & Migration, Economies, Economic Inequality, Environment, Climate Change, Environmental Disasters, Gender, Women, Gendered Power Relations, NGOs Regions: Asia, South Asia Countries: Bangladesh

Year: 1996

Climate Finance: Why Does It Matter for Women?

Citation:

Williams, Mariama. 2017. “Climate Finance: Why Does It Matter for Women?” In Financing for Gender Equality: Realising Women’s Rights through Gender Responsive Budgeting, edited by Zohra Khan and Nalini Burn, 273-311. Medford, MA: Springer Publishing Company, Inc.

Author: Mariama Williams

Annotation:

“Ultimately, climate goals, priorities and the concomitant actions that are implemented to address the growing climate challenges concern the well-being, livelihood and lives of all citizens—women, men and children, across different socio-economic classes and life cycles. The preamble of Paris Agreement paragraph 7 exhorts Parties to the agreement, ‘when taking action to address climate change (to) respect, promote and consider their respective obligations on human rights, the right to health, the rights of indigenous peoples, local communities, migrants, children, persons with disabilities and people in vulnerable situations and the right to development, as well as gender equality, empowerment of women and intergenerational equity’ (Williams, 2017, p. 276)."

Topics: Civil Society, Class, Development, Economic Inequality, Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Women, Girls, Boys, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality, Globalization, International Financial Institutions

Year: 2017

Gendered Responses to Drought in Yunnan Province, China

Citation:

Yufang Su, Suman Bisht, Andreas Wilkes, Neera Shrestha Pradhan, Yahui Zou, Song Liu, and Kevin Hyde. 2017. “Gendered Responses to Drought in Yunnan Province, China.” Mountain Research and Development 37 (1): 24–34.

Authors: Yufang Su, Suman Bisht, Andreas Wilkes, Neera Shrestha Pradhan, Yahui Zou, Song Liu, Kevin Hyde

Abstract:

Vulnerability to and perceptions of climate change may be significantly affected by gender. However, in China, gender is rarely addressed in climate adaption or resource management strategies. This paper demonstrates the relevance of gender in responses to climate change in the mountainous province of Yunnan in southwest China. Based on surveys undertaken during a record-breaking drought, the paper explores how women and men in a village in Baoshan Prefecture differ in their perceptions of and responses to drought, and how the changing roles of women and men in the home and the community are influencing water management at the village level. Our results show that despite the increasingly active role of women in managing water during the drought, they are excluded from community-level decision-making about water. The paper argues that given the importance of gender differences in perceptions of and responses to drought, the lack of a gender perspective in Chinese policy may undermine efforts to support local resource management and climate adaptation.

Keywords: drought, gender analysis, climate change, responses

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Women, Men, Gender Roles, Gender Analysis, Gendered Power Relations, Political Participation Regions: Asia, East Asia Countries: China

Year: 2016

Women’s Rights in Climate Change: Using Video as a Tool for Empowerment in Nepal

Citation:

Khamis, Marion, Tamara Plush, and Carmen Sepúlveda Zelaya. 2009. “Women’s Rights in Climate Change: Using Video as a Tool for Empowerment in Nepal.” Gender and Development 17 (1): 125–35.

Authors: Marion Khamis, Tamara Plush, Carmen Sepúlveda Zelaya

Abstract:

An innovative Action Aid-supplied project in Nepal has seen women's empowerment make rapid progress through the use of video discussions about climate change. In this exploration of the project, we ask what we can learn from the use of such technology, and consider the implications for international development agencies and their efforts to support women's rights.

Keywords: women's rights, gender, climate change, power, women and environment, Nepal, adaptation, video

Topics: Development, Environment, Climate Change, International Organizations, Rights, Women's Rights Regions: Asia, South Asia Countries: Nepal

Year: 2009

Wading Past Assumptions: Gender Dimensions of Climate Change Adaptation in Coastal Communities of the Philippines

Citation:

Kathryn Graziano. 2014. “Wading Past Assumptions: Gender Dimensions of Climate Change Adaptation in Coastal Communities of the Philippines.” Master’s thesis, University of Washington.

Author: Kathryn Graziano

Abstract:

Climate change is expected to have a broad range of impacts on social and ecological systems. Common discourse asserts that women in developing countries are more vulnerable to climate change than men, and perpetuates assumptions about the role of women in climate change adaptation (CCA). This study examines the gender dimensions of CCA in fishing villages of the Philippines, a country with exceptionally high marine biodiversity supporting dense coastal populations that are highly vulnerable to climate change. The study seeks to 1) Describe gender mainstreaming in Philippine CCA documents 2) Identify and challenge assumptions about women and climate change, 3) Examine men’s and women’s beliefs, values, perceptions of risks, resource dependency, and awareness associated with climate change and 4) Evaluate the implications of gendered relationships with fisheries and the environment on CCA. Quantitative social surveys were administered randomly to marine resource users in 30 coastal villages within three Philippine provinces (Palawan, Occidental Mindoro, and Batangas). Dependent variables associated with CCA were analyzed relative to gender. In this case, women were less connected to nature, more risk tolerant, and equally inclined to conservation attitudes as men. Women were also equally aware of climate change and more aware of CCA plans, but less likely to participate in outreach activities. The results offer insights that dispel certain generalizations about women and climate change, and present opportunities for improved gender mainstreaming in climate change adaptation.

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender Mainstreaming Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Philippines

Year: 2014

Geothermal Energy, Climate Change and Gender in Kenya

Citation:

Ogola, Pacifica F. Achieng. 2010. "Geothermal Energy, Climate Change and Gender in Kenya." Paper presented at the World Geothermal Congress, Bali, Indonesia, April 25-29.

Author: Pacifica F. Achieng Ogola

Abstract:

Geothermal energy plays a vital role in the context of climate change as a mitigation and adaptation technology. However, the full potential role of geothermal in this regard has not been realized in Kenya, especially in responding to the impacts of climate change at the micro-level where it occurs, meeting gender specific needs and ultimately the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). While geothermal energy is considered the most feasible option for capacity expansion, very little has been done to assess its role in climate change beyond Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects. Most unexploited geothermal prospect areas in Kenya experience adverse climate impacts. The development of the resource in these areas could enhance adaptive capacity and resilience of the local people. The paper aims to discuss in general the role geothermal energy should play in mitigation and adaptation to climate change in Kenya and how its utilization can meet different gender economic requirements at the micro-level. Barriers to achieving this with possible recommendations are also discussed. 

Keywords: geothermal energy, climate change, gender

Topics: Development, Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Infrastructure, Energy Regions: Africa, East Africa Countries: Kenya

Year: 2010

Sustainable Energy for All or Sustainable Energy for Men? Gender and the Construction of Identity Within Climate Technology Entrepreneurship in Kenya

Citation:

Marshall, Mipsie, David Ockwell, and Rob Byrne. 2017. "Sustainable Energy for All or Sustainable Energy for Men? Gender and the Construction of Identity Within Climate Technology Entrepreneurship in Kenya." Progress in Development Studies 17 (2): 148-72.

Authors: Mipsie Marshall, David Ockwell, Rob Byrne

Abstract:

As international climate and development policy and funding efforts accelerate, this article articulates an urgent new research agenda aimed at redressing the existing failure of policy and research to attend to gender in relation to climate mitigation (as opposed to adaptation). Focusing on the transfer and uptake of low carbon energy technologies, including a review of the literature on women and entrepreneurship and critical discourse analysis of the treatment of climate technology entrepreneurs by infoDev (World Bank) in Kenya, the prevalence of private sector entrepreneurial approaches to climate and development policy and practice in this field is demonstrated to be reinforcing gendered power imbalances.

Keywords: gender identity, entrepreneurship, climate technology, climate mitigation, Kenya, discourse analysis

Topics: Development, Economies, Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality, Infrastructure, Energy Regions: Africa, East Africa Countries: Kenya

Year: 2017

Pages

© 2018 CONSORTIUM ON GENDER, SECURITY & HUMAN RIGHTSLEGAL STATEMENT All photographs used on this site, and any materials posted on it, are the property of their respective owners, and are used by permission. Photographs: The images used on the site may not be downloaded, used, or reproduced in any way without the permission of the owner of the image. Materials: Visitors to the site are welcome to peruse the materials posted for their own research or for educational purposes. These materials, whether the property of the Consortium or of another, may only be reproduced with the permission of the owner of the material. This website contains copyrighted materials. The Consortium believes that any use of copyrighted material on this site is both permissive and in accordance with the Fair Use doctrine of 17 U.S.C. § 107. If, however, you believe that your intellectual property rights have been violated, please contact the Consortium at info@genderandsecurity.org.

Subscribe to RSS - Climate Change