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Boys

Acción Colectiva, Violencia Política y Género: el Análisis de las Organizaciones Insurgentes Político-militares en Colombia: el Ejército de Liberación Nacional (ELN) Actor de Referencia

Citation:

Rodríguez Pizarro, Alba Nubia. 2009. “Acción Colectiva, Violencia Política y Género: el Análisis de las Organizaciones Insurgentes Político-militares en Colombia: el Ejército de Liberación Nacional (ELN) Actor de Referencia.” PhD Thesis, Madrid: Universidad Complutense de Madrid.

Author: Alba Nubia Rodríguez Pizarro

Abstract:

El objetivo de este trabajo es contribuir al conocimiento de los actores del conflicto armado (organizaciones político-militares) y a la discusión sobre la confrontación armada en Colombia, a partir del análisis de la construcción social y cultural de un actor colectivo insurgente que emplea la violencia como medio de acción y que ha estado inmerso en el conflicto armado de larga duración que se vive en el país desde hace aproximadamente cinco décadas. La construcción social y cultural de los actores y sus acciones implica individuos en relación (hombres y mujeres), por tanto la perspectiva de género se convirtió en un enfoque transversal a la indagación y al análisis de los procesos que subyacen a la construcción social y cultural del actor de referencia. (E-prints Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

Topics: Armed Conflict, Civil Wars, Civil Society, Combatants, Female Combatants, Male Combatants, Displacement & Migration, Gender, Women, Men, Girls, Boys, Masculinity/ies, Gender Roles, Femininity/ies, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Hierarchies, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Non-state Armed Groups, Political Participation, Violence Regions: Americas, Central America, South America Countries: Colombia

Year: 2009

Domestic violence prevention through the Constructing Violence-free Masculinities programme: an experience from Peru

Citation:

Mitchell, Rhoda. 2013. “Domestic violence prevention through the Constructing Violence-free Masculinities programme: an experience from Peru.” Gender and Development, 21 (1): 97-109.

Author: Rhoda Mitchell

Abstract:

This paper examines work undertaken with male perpetrators of violence in the Construction of Violence-free Masculinities, a project run by the Centro Mujer Teresa de Jesus, a Women’s Centre located in a poor peri-urban district of Lima, Peru, in conjunction with Oxfam-Quebec. Centre staff faced the challenge of how to work with men who are violent towards their intimate partners. They use a community education approach, to challenge powerful stereotypes about gender roles, to question men’s assumed dominance over women, and support men to construct new forms of masculinity, without violence. Ultimately, the programme seeks to modify and change the beliefs, values, attitudes, and behaviours of men who are aggressors.

Keywords: masculinity, Intimate partner violence, domestic violence, men's groups

Topics: Armed Conflict, Civil Wars, Ethnic/Communal Wars, Domestic Violence, Education, Gender, Women, Men, Girls, Boys, Masculinity/ies, Gender Roles, Gender Analysis, Gender Balance, Gender-Based Violence, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy, Gender Hierarchies, Gender Equality/Inequality, Gender Equity, Masculinism, Households, NGOs, Nonviolence, Sexual Violence, Male Perpetrators, Rape, SV against women, Sexuality, Violence Regions: Americas, Central America, South America Countries: Peru

Year: 2013

Political Instability, Gender Discrimination, and Population Growth in Development Countries

Citation:

Lehmijoki, Ulla and Tapio Palokangas. 2006. “Political Instability, Gender Discrimination, and Population Growth in Development Countries.” Journal of Population Economics 19 (2): 431-46.

Authors: Ulla Lehmijoki, Tapio Palokangas

Abstract:

This paper introduces gender discrimination and population growth into a model of political economy. The government keeps up the military for the sake of political instability in the country. It is shown that if the risk of internal conflicts is high, then the government needs a bigger military and a larger supply of young men for it. The government is then willing to boost population growth by keeping women outside the production (e.g. neglecting their education or restricting their movement). Some empirical evidence on the interdependence of political instability, population growth, and gender discrimination is provided. 

Keywords: population growth, discrimination, political instability

Topics: Armed Conflict, Civil Wars, Combatants, Male Combatants, Economies, Economic Inequality, Poverty, Gender, Women, Men, Girls, Boys, Gender Roles, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Hierarchies, Households, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Political Economies, Religion, Rights, Human Rights, Women's Rights Regions: Africa, MENA, North Africa, Asia, Middle East

Year: 2006

Gender and consociational power-sharing in Northern Ireland

Citation:

Hayes, Bernadette C. and Ian McAllister. 2012. “Gender and consociational power-sharing in Northern Ireland.” International Political Science Review 34 (2): 123-139.

Authors: Bernadette C. Hayes, Ian McAllister

Abstract:

Designing political arrangements is the most viable approach to resolving inter-communal divisions in post-conflict societies. Yet women are frequently ill-served by such peace settlements, since gender equality is often sacrificed in an effort to resolve conflicts over national identity. Northern Ireland is no exception to this trend. Although the 1998 Northern Ireland Agreement made specific provision for gender equality, it was primarily framed in terms of national identity. This article examines to what extent this focus on inter-communal ethnic division undermined support for the Agreement among women. Using data from the 2010 Northern Ireland Election Survey, we examine gender differences in attitudes towards the consociational institutions of government. The results show a significant gender gap in support for the institutional arrangements that were established by the Agreement. We propose and test three explanations to account for this gender gap. 

Keywords: post-conflict, consociationalism, gender, national identity, power-sharing

Topics: Armed Conflict, Civil Wars, Ethnic/Communal Wars, Civil Society, Democracy / Democratization, Domestic Violence, Economies, Poverty, Ethnicity, Gender, Women, Men, Girls, Boys, Governance, Constitutions, Elections, Post-conflict Governance, Justice, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Paramilitaries, Nationalism, Peacebuilding, Peace Processes, Political Participation, Post-Conflict, Rights, Human Rights, Women's Rights, Weapons /Arms Regions: Europe, Western Europe Countries: Ireland

Year: 2012

'We Do It So That We Will Be Men': Masculinity Politics in Colonial Namibia, 1915-1949

Citation:

McCullers, Molly. 2011. “’We Do It So That We Will Be Men’: Masculinity Politics in Colonial Namibia, 1915-1949.” Journal of African History 52 (1): 43-62. 

Author: Molly McCullers

Abstract:

This article examines struggles for masculinity among Herero elders, South African colonial administrators, and the Otruppa, a Herero youth society that appropriated a German military aesthetic, in Namibia between 1915 and 1949. As previous scholars have argued, masculinities are mutually constituted through competitions for authority, though dominance is rarely achieved. Such contestations were integral to processes of Herero societal reconstruction following German rule and during South African colonial state formation, beginning in 1915. Different generational experiences of colonial violence and the destruction of the material resources that undergirded elders' authority led to conflicts between elders and youths over how to define Herero masculinity and negotiate authority in a rapidly changing colonial milieu.

Topics: Armed Conflict, Coloniality/Post-Coloniality, Gender, Boys, Masculinity/ies, Gendered Power Relations, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Militarism, Violence Regions: Africa, Southern Africa Countries: Namibia

Year: 2011

Swines, Hazels, and the Dirty Dozen: Masculinity, Territoriality, and the Youth Gangs of Soweto, 1960-1976

Citation:

Glaser, Clive. 1998. “Swines, Hazels, and the Dirty Dozen: Masculinity, Territoriality, and the Youth Gangs of Soweto, 1960-1976.” Journal of South African Studies 24 (4): 719-736. 

Author: Clive Glaser

Abstract:

During the 1960s and early 1970s, the youth gangs of Soweto, like their predecessors throughout the Witwatersrand in the 1940s and 1950s, developed a sense of masculine identity intimately linked to their territories. There was a great deal of cultural continuity between these exclusively male urban gangs and rural age grades: groups of male adolescents separated off from established households to experiment with their sexuality, hone their fighting skills and assert their independence. The social mobility of most city-bred black youths, however, was blocked and much of their masculine dignity was invested in their ability to dominate their local streets. Gang identity depended on an overlap of personal and spatial familiarity, which took time to develop. Gangs therefore usually emerged in fairly settled neighbourhoods. While there was relative continuity in gang formation in the older parts of Soweto, especially Orlando, gangs took longer to cohere in the newly resettled parts of Soweto like Meadowlands and Diepkloof.

Topics: Clan, Gender, Men, Boys, Masculinity/ies, Tribe, Violence Regions: Africa, Southern Africa Countries: South Africa

Year: 1998

Plano Nacional de Politicas para as Mulheres

Citation:

Presidência da República. 2013. Plano Nacional de Politicas para as Mulheres. Brasilia D.F: Plano Nacional de Politicas para as Mulheres.

Author: Secretaria de Políticas para as Mulheres – Presidência da República

Topics: Civil Society, Development, Economies, Economic Inequality, Education, Gender, Women, Men, Girls, Boys, Gender Roles, Gender Analysis, Gender-Based Violence, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Hierarchies, Gender Equality/Inequality, Governance, Health, Political Participation, Rights, Land Rights, Property Rights, Women's Rights Regions: Americas, Central America, South America Countries: Brazil

Year: 2013

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