Women’s Property Rights HIV and AIDS & Domestic Violence: Research Findings from Two Districts in South Africa and Uganda

Citation:

Swaminathan, Hema. 2008. Women’s Property Rights HIV and AIDS & Domestic Violence: Research Findings from Two Districts in South Africa and Uganda. Cape Town, ZA: Human Sciences Research Council.

Author: Hema Swaminathan

Abstract:

Women's property and inheritance rights are recognised in international law and in a growing number of countries worldwide, yet women in many developing countries do not have the right to own or inherit property. At the same time, women are increasingly heading up households and are in critical need of land and property for economic security, particularly in the context of the AIDS epidemic - in fact, secure property rights are believed to be a factor in reducing women's risk of contracting HIV and in protecting them from domestic violence. To better understand the role of tenure security in protecting against, and mitigating the effects of, HIV and violence, this book explores these linkages in Amajuba, South Africa and Iganga, Uganda. Results from the qualitative study revealed that property ownership, while not easily linked to women's ability to prevent HIV infection, can nonetheless mitigate the impact of AIDS, and enhance a woman's ability to leave a violent situation. (HSRC Press)

Topics: Domestic Violence, Economies, Gender, Women, Health, HIV/AIDS, Households, International Law, Rights, Property Rights, Women's Rights Regions: Africa, East Africa, Southern Africa Countries: South Africa, Uganda

Year: 2008

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