Women’s Land Rights in South Asia: Struggles and Diverse Contexts

Citation:

Velayudhan, Meera. 2009. “Women’s Land Rights in South Asia: Struggles and Diverse Contexts.” Economic and Political Weekly, 74–79.

Author: Meera Velayudhan

Abstract:

In south Asia, since the 1970s, previously marginalised sections of the rural poor started to organise themselves in movements. In recent years, most of these struggles have been directed against the impact of the liberalising state on the rural poor. For the vast majority, there has been an erosion of livelihood avenues, food insecurity, a loss of assets - owing largely to the loss of their traditional access and control of natural resources. Food security is threatened by loss of biodiversity and loss of knowledge. Women who suffer the most from these trends have in all movements related to these issues, particpating intensely, widely and also in leadership roles. While many of these movements have been documented, very little is known of women claiming their rights within these movements. At the same time, many other struggles of women are ongoing for land and other resource rights. These efforts have been isolated but exchanges of experiences are growing and suggest a range of newer strategies are emerging, therby opening up possibilities for more effective response and common struggles.

Topics: Economies, Gender, Women, Livelihoods, Political Economies, Rights, Land Rights, Women's Rights Regions: Asia, South Asia

Year: 2009

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