Used, Abused, Arrested and Deported: The Case for Extending Immigration Benefits to Protect Victims of Trafficking and Secure Prosecution of Traffickers

Citation:

Haynes, Dina Francesca. 2004. "Used, Abused, Arrested and Deported: The Case for Extending Immigration Benefits to Protect Victims of Trafficking and Secure Prosecution of Traffickers." Human Rights Quarterly 26 (2): 221-72.

Author: Dina Francesca Haynes

Abstract:

Organized crime rings exploit 700,000 to 4 million new victims of human trafficking each year, typically luring them across borders where they are more vulnerable to abuse. Trafficking in Southeastern Europe is a relatively new phenomenon, fueled by the dissolution of the former Soviet Union, as well as the presence of international peacekeepers who have sometimes exacerbated the problem. The two main anti-trafficking models emphasize the prosecution of the trafficker or the protection of the victim, but neither adequately addresses immigration options that could serve to protect the victim and provide better evidence with which to prosecute the traffickers for their crimes.

Topics: Gender, Trafficking, Human Trafficking, Sex Trafficking Regions: Europe, Balkans Countries: Bosnia & Herzegovina, Croatia, Montenegro, Serbia

Year: 2004

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