From Unity to Divergence and Back Again: Security and Economy in Feminist International Relations

Citation:

Sjoberg, Laura. 2015. “From Unity to Divergence and Back Again: Security and Economy in Feminist International Relations.” Politics & Gender 11 (02): 408–13. doi:10.1017/S1743923X15000112.

Author: Laura Sjoberg

Abstract:

In Gender and International Security: Feminist Perspectives on Achieving Global Security, J. Ann Tickner (1992) identified three main dimensions to “achieving global security”—national security, economic security, and ecological security: conflict, economics, and the environment. Much of the work in feminist peace studies that inspired early feminist International Relations (IR) work (e.g., Brock-Utne 1989; Reardon 1985) and many of Tickner's contemporaries (e.g., Enloe 1989; Peterson and Runyan 1991; Pettman 1996) also saw political economy and a feminist conception of security as intrinsically interlinked. Yet, as feminist IR research evolved in the early 21st century, more scholars were thinking either about political economy or about war and political violence, but not both.

Topics: Armed Conflict, Conflict Prevention, Economies, Environment, Feminisms, Political Economies, Security, Human Security, Violence

Year: 2015

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