Uncertain Predictions, Invisible Impacts, and the Need to Mainstream Gender in Climate Change Adaptations

Citation:

Nelson, Valerie, Kate Meadows, Terry Cannon, John Morton, and Adrienne Martin. 2002. “Uncertain Predictions, Invisible Impacts, and the Need to Mainstream Gender in Climate Change Adaptations.” Gender and Development 10 (2): 51–59.

Authors: Valerie Nelson, Kate Meadows, Terry Cannon, John Morton, Adrienne Martin

Abstract:

Vulnerability to environmental degradation and natural hazards is articulated along social, poverty, and gender lines. Just as gender is not sufficiently mainstreamed in many areas of development policy and practice, so the potential impacts of climate change on gender relations have not been studied, and remain invisible. In this article we outline climate change predictions, and explore the effects of long-term climate change on agriculture, ecological systems, and gender relations, since these could be significant. We identify predicted changes in natural hazard frequency and intensity as a result of climate change, and explore the gendered effects of natural hazards. We highlight the urgent need to integrate gender analyses into public policy-making, and in adaptation responses to climate change.

Topics: Economies, Poverty, Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Gender Analysis, Gender Mainstreaming

Year: 2002

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