Sex, Gender, and September 11

Citation:

Charlesworth, Hilary, and Christine Chinkin. 2002. “Sex, Gender, and September 11.” The American Journal of International Law 96 (3): 600–605. doi:10.2307/3062163.

Authors: Hilary Charlesworth, Christine Chinkin

Annotation:

EDITORIAL COMMENT

 "The October 2001 issue of the American Journal of International Law contained several editorials on the international law implications of the hijackings of September 11, 2001, and their aftermath. In one respect these editorials resemble other writings on these events in academic and popular media: questions of sex and gender are largely overlooked. In our view, however, concepts of sex and gender provide a valuable perspective on these devastating actions. We use the term "sex" here to refer to issues about women as distinct biological beings from men, and the term "gender" to encompass social understandings of femininity and masculinity. Although the value of this distinction is much debated among feminist scholars, we find it helpful in this context" (American Society of International Law, 600).

Topics: Gender, Women, Men, Masculinity/ies, Gender Analysis, Femininity/ies, Terrorism, Violence Regions: Americas, North America Countries: United States of America

Year: 2002

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