For Richer, for Poorer: Marriage and Casualized Sex in East African Artisanal Mining Settlements

Citation:

Bryceson, Deborah Fahy, Jesper Bosse Jønsson, and Hannelore Verbrugge. 2014. “For Richer, for Poorer: Marriage and Casualized Sex in East African Artisanal Mining Settlements.” Development and Change 45 (1): 79–104. doi:10.1111/dech.12067.

Authors: Deborah Fahy Bryceson, Jesper Bosse Jønsson, Hannelore Verbrugge

Abstract:

Migrants to Tanzania’s artisanal gold mining sites seek mineral wealth, which is accompanied by high risks of occupational hazards, economic failure, AIDS and social censure from their home communities. Male miners in these settlements compete to attract newly arrived young women who are perceived to be diverting male material support from older women and children’s economic survival. This article explores the dynamics of monogamy, polygamy and promiscuity in the context of rapid occupational change. It shows how a wide spectrum of productive and welfare outcomes is generated through sexual experimentation, which calls into question conventional concepts of prostitution, marriage and gender power relations.

Topics: Economies, Extractive Industries, Gender, Women, Men, Health, Sexuality Regions: Africa, East Africa Countries: Tanzania

Year: 2014

© 2017 CONSORTIUM ON GENDER, SECURITY & HUMAN RIGHTSLEGAL STATEMENT All photographs used on this site, and any materials posted on it, are the property of their respective owners, and are used by permission. Photographs: The images used on the site may not be downloaded, used, or reproduced in any way without the permission of the owner of the image. Materials: Visitors to the site are welcome to peruse the materials posted for their own research or for educational purposes. These materials, whether the property of the Consortium or of another, may only be reproduced with the permission of the owner of the material. This website contains copyrighted materials. The Consortium believes that any use of copyrighted material on this site is both permissive and in accordance with the Fair Use doctrine of 17 U.S.C. § 107. If, however, you believe that your intellectual property rights have been violated, please contact the Consortium at info@genderandsecurity.org.