Possible Contributions of a Psychology of Liberation: Whither Health and Human Rights?

Citation:

Lykes, M. Brinton. 2000. “Possible Contributions of a Psychology of Liberation: Whither Health and Human Rights?” Journal of Health Psychology 5 (3): 383-97. doi:10.1177/135910530000500312.

Author: M. Brinton Lykes

Abstract:

This article explores the possible contributions of a psychology of liberation for the practice of health psychology. It explores alternative psychological 'practices,' for example participatory action research, with groups historically marginalized from access to power and resources. Selected lenses for crafting a liberatory psychology include: discourse of human rights and mental health; cultural and constructivist psychological theory; and reflexivity. Specific examples from the author's work with Mayan women in rural Guatemala in the context of ongoing war and subsequent efforts at peace building are discussed to clarify possible contributions of psychologists committed to accompanying local communities in creating more just futures. Selected challenges and contradictions encountered in this work are discussed.

Topics: Gender, Women, Health, Mental Health, Peacebuilding, Rights, Human Rights Regions: Americas, Central America Countries: Guatemala

Year: 2000

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