Negotiating the Transition to Democracy and Reforming the Security Sector: The Vital Contributions of South African Women

Citation:

Naraghi-Anderlini, Sanam, and Camille Pampell Conaway. 2004. Negotiating the Transition to Democracy and Reforming the Security Sector: The Vital Contributions of South African Women. Washington, DC: Institute for Inclusive Security.

Authors: Sanam Naraghi-Anderlini, Camille Pampell Conaway

Abstract:

In October 2000, for the first time in its history, the UN Security Council acknowledged that women have a key role in promoting international stability by passing Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace, and Security. It called on all parties to ensure women’s participation in peace processes, from the prevention of conflict to negotiations and postwar reconstruction. The Women Waging Peace Policy Commission was established to examine peace processes, with a particular focus on the contributions of women.

This report, Negotiating the Transition to Democracy and Reforming the Security Sector: The Vital Contributions of South African Women, documents the strategies women used to gain full participation in negotiations and in the transition, as well as their influence in shaping security sector policies and institutions. (Institute for Inclusive Security)

Topics: Democracy / Democratization, Gender, Women, Security Sector Reform Regions: Africa, Southern Africa Countries: South Africa

Year: 2004

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