Messing with Gender in Feminist Political Ecology

Citation:

Mollett, Sharlene, and Caroline Faria. 2013. “Messing with Gender in Feminist Political Ecology.” Geoforum 45 (March): 116–25.

Authors: Sharlene Mollett , Caroline Faria

Abstract:

Feminist political ecology (fpe) is at a crossroads. Over the last 2 years, feminist political ecologists have begun to reflect on and debate the strengths of this subfield. In this article, we contribute by pointing to the limited theorization of race in this body of work. We argue that fpe must theorize a more complex and messier, notion of ‘gender’, one that accounts for race, racialization and racism more explicitly. Building on the work of feminist geography and critical race scholarship, we argue for a postcolonial intersectional analysis in fpe – putting this theory to work in an analysis of race, gender and whiteness in Honduras. With this intervention we demonstrate how theorizing race and gender as mutually constituted richly complicates our understanding of the politics of natural resource access and control in the Global South.
 

Keywords: feminist political ecology, race, whiteness, postcolonial intersectionality

Topics: Coloniality/Post-Coloniality, Environment, Feminisms, Gender, Women, Masculinity/ies, Gender Roles, Femininity/ies, Gendered Power Relations, Race Regions: Americas, Central America Countries: Honduras

Year: 2013

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