The Mental Health Status of Women in the Navy and Marine Corps: Preliminary Findings from the Perceptions of Wellness and Readiness Assessment

Citation:

Hourani, Laurel L., and Huixing Yuan. 1999. "The Mental Health Status of Women in the Navy and Marine Corps: Preliminary Findings from the Perceptions of Wellness and Readiness Assessment." Military Medicine 164 (3): 174- 81.

Authors: Laurel L. Hourani, Huixing Yuan

Abstract:

Examined the most common adult psychiatric disorders of Navy and Marine Corps personnel and compared their military subpopulations. A population-based, multi-stage, cluster sample of 782 active duty Navy and Marine Corps females and males (aged 18–64 yrs) were administered a structured computerized telephone interview to make Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-III-Revised (DSM-III-R) psychiatric diagnoses. Results indicate that females had about 5 times the risk of experiencing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than males and about twice the risk of a major depressive episode. Of all personnel meeting diagnostic criteria for an active mental disorder, only 19% sought mental health care in the last year. Females generally sought treatment more readily than males. (Abstract from PsycINFO)

Keywords: mental health, female soldiers, posttraumatic stress disorder, depression

Topics: Gender, Women, Men, Health, Mental Health, PTSD, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Militaries Regions: Americas, North America Countries: United States of America

Year: 1999

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