Men Behaving Differently: South African Men Since 1994

Citation:

Walker, Liz. 2005. “Men Behaving Differently: South African Men Since 1994.” Culture, Health & Sexuality 7 (3): 225–38.

Author: Liz Walker

Abstract:

Liberal versions of sexuality, which mark South Africa's new democracy, have had a number of highly contradictory consequences for women and men, as old notions of masculinity and male privilege have been destabilized. The transition to democracy has precipitated a crisis of masculinity. Orthodox notions of masculinity are being challenged and new versions of masculinity are emerging in their place. Some men are seeking to be part of a new social order while others are defensively clinging to more familiar routines. Drawing on in-depth interviews with young African working class men, this paper explores new masculinities in contemporary South Africa. It examines how men negotiate their manhood in a period of social turbulence and transition. Masculinity, male sexuality, and the expectations which men have of themselves, each other and women are contested and in crisis.

Keywords: masculinity, sexuality, violence, gender, transition

Topics: Gender, Men, Masculinity/ies, Sexuality Regions: Africa, Southern Africa Countries: South Africa

Year: 2005

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