Male-Perpetrated Violence Among Vietnam Veteran Couples: Relationships With Veteran’s Early Life Characteristics, Trauma History, and PTSD Symptomatology

Citation:

Orcutt, Holly K., Lynda A. King, and Daniel W. King. 2003. “Male-Perpetrated Violence Among Vietnam Veteran Couples: Relationships With Veteran’s Early Life Characteristics, Trauma History, and PTSD Symptomatology.” Journal of Traumatic Stress 16 (4): 381–90. doi:10.1023/A:1024470103325.

Authors: Holly K. Orcutt , Lynda A. King, Daniel W. King

Abstract:

Using structural equation modeling, we examined the impact of early-life stressors, war-zone stressors, and PTSD symptom severity on partner's reports of recent male-perpetrated intimate partner violence (IPV) among 376 Vietnam veteran couples. Results indicated that several variables demonstrated direct relationships with IPV, including relationship quality with mother, war-zone stressor variables, and PTSD symptom severity. Importantly, retrospective reports of a stressful early family life, childhood antisocial behavior, and war-zone stressors were indirectly associated with IPV via PTSD. One of our 2 war-zone stressor variables, perceived threat, had both direct and indirect (through PTSD) relationships with IPV. Experiencing PTSD symptoms as a result of previous trauma appears to increase an individual's risk for perpetrating IPV. Implications for research and treatment are discussed.

Topics: Combatants, Domestic Violence, Gender, Health, PTSD, Trauma Regions: Americas, North America Countries: Vietnam

Year: 2003

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