Long-Term Effects of Civil Conflict on Women’s Health Outcomes in Peru

Citation:

Grimard, Franque, and Sonia Laszlo. 2014. “Long-Term Effects of Civil Conflict on Women’s Health Outcomes in Peru.” World Development 54 (February): 139–55. doi:10.1016/j.worlddev.2013.08.004.

Authors: Franque Grimard , Sonia Laszlo

Abstract:

Peru’s internal conflict resulted in over 69,000 deaths and disappearances from 1980 to 2000. We investigate the long-term health effects on women exposed to this conflict in utero and in early life. Utilizing recent Demographic and Health Surveys (DHSs) and district-level conflict data, we find that exposure in utero has long lasting impacts on a woman’s height (an indicator of long-term health), even controlling for life-cycle factors (education and wealth) and the availability of public health centers. We find no long-term effects on short term health (anemia and Body Mass Index (BMI)) or psychosocial indicators (domestic abuse).

Keywords: health, armed conflict, Peru, fetal organs, life-course models

Topics: Armed Conflict, Civil Wars, Gender, Women, Health, Reproductive Health, Violence Regions: Americas, South America Countries: Peru

Year: 2013

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