Inventing Bushcraft: Masculinity, Technology, and Environment in Central Africa, ca. 750-1250

Citation:

de Luna, Kathryn M. 2017. “Inventing Bushcraft: Masculinity, Technology, and Environment in Central Africa, ca. 750-1250.” RCC Perspectives: Transformations in Environment and Society, no. 4, 51–60.

Author: Kathryn M. de Luna

Abstract:

Kathryn M. de Luna explores the micropolitics of knowledge production through a case study of the history of bushcraft. She highlights the special status given to practitioners of bush technologies—specifically Central Eastern Botatwe speakers—in south central Africa. The invention of a new landscape category, isokwe, and the novel status of seasonal technicians marked the development of a virile, sexualized masculinity available to some men; but it was also a status with deeply sensuous, material, and social meanings for women.

Keywords: fishing, gender, hunting, indigenous knowledge, technology

Topics: Environment, Climate Change, Gender, Masculinity/ies Regions: Africa, Central Africa

Year: 2017

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